Film Emulsion Review: Lomography Color Negative 800 (35mm and 120)

Of all the color negative films Lomography sells, my consistent favorite has to be Lomography Color Negative 800. As the company’s highest ISO color negative film, you should expect to get good colors and some amazingly warm skin tones if you’re into that sort of thing. The film is designed for photographers who need a fast film for a variety of reasons. In some ways, I find it to be in-between both Kodak Portra 800 and Fujifilm Superia 800. Where the latter was the bread and butter for photojournalists for years, Kodak Portra 800 is instead meant for portraits in low light–but I’ve seen it capture some stellar Northern Lights photos. Lomography Color Negative 800 on the other hand works pretty swimmingly for both.

I’ve been testing and using Lomography Color Negative 800 on and off for the past few years in a variety of cameras. I can say with all certainty that it’s probably my favorite alternative to CineStill 800T when shooting at night.

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Review: Nikon D850 (A Fantastic DSLR, But I’m Over DSLRs)

The Nikon D850 surely has to be one of our new favorite DSLRs.

If you look around at various reviews of the Nikon D850 on the web, they’ll most likely rate it as one of the best cameras ever made thus far. In truth, it really does perform very admirably and it absolutely does have a great sensor at the heart. Professional photographers considering making some sort of move since the Nikon D810 hadn’t been updated in awhile have an option that is going to last them a few more years before the industry changes yet again. That statement is more or less the basis of my review. The days of being able to know that your camera won’t be updated for four years are probably gone, but that doesn’t mean you won’t be able to take great photos with it long after it has been updated by some shiny new thing. The Nikon D850 is a fantastic image taking device and tool in the hands of the right photographer. It has a lot of great technology at the heart, but a part of me is wondering about its futureproofing.

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The ReEdit: Editing Skin Tones and Getting More Control in Capture One

In today’s episode of The ReEdit, I decided to go back into my portfolio of hard drives to a shoot from 2013. This session was done with a fan favorite: Grace. I was reviewing a Profoto light and the images, even today, hold up. First off, it was done with what’s an old camera by today’s standards, the Canon 5D Mk II. However, when using it with the Sigma 35mm f1.4 Art lens combined with the Profoto light I’m able to get sharpness that rivals modern cameras and lenses. This proves more than anything that your lighting is really what matters. Then I go into the editing process.

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How to Get Film-like Warm Skin Tones With Daylight White Balance

One of the reasons I use specific white balances like Daylight when shooting photos is because it tends to take the guesswork out of editing and colors. Daylight white balance is balanced to be fairly warm and to counteract the already very cool light that daylight is. Though many times there are situations where you’d rather have warm skin tones in the scene. For the most part, what people tend to do is just work with the white balance to make the skin warmer but then in the process just make the whole scene warmer.

This happens a whole lot when working during the blue hour, in overcast weather etc.

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Film Emulsion Review: Kodak Portra 160 (35mm and 120 Formats)

When you work with a film like Kodak Portra 160, you get a pretty fine detailed film designed to be used more or less with controlled lighting. Though interestingly enough, I’ve personally had much better results working with many other films using controlled lighting and instead found that this film is one of the best to be used with natural light. Designed for skin tones in portraiture, Kodak Portra 160 has a very muted color palette but not as pastel as Fujifilm’s Pro 160 NS–its closest competitor which is now discontinued. Like many other films, it is available in both 120 and 35mm. But if you’re reading this website, then you’re probably only using it in 120.

I’ve been using Kodak Portra 160 for years; and even though I prefer to work with 400, 160 is surely a nice film in the right settings.

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A Film Photographer’s Introduction to the Kodak Portra Family

We love a good party and when we found out that the Portra line is about to celebrate its twentieth birthday next year (introduced in 1998!), we thought we would take the time to cover some ground (and after, perhaps raise a glass) when it comes to Kodak’s Portra line. Kodak Portra has put out a variety of film stocks from this line, some of which are discontinued, but three of which are now a staple to film photographers like those of us at Carmencita and yourself. We’re gonna cover some ground on those three that take the cake when it comes to Kodak’s Portra line: Portra 160, Portra 400, and Portra 800 ISO.

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Film Review: Lomography Color Negative 400 (35mm and 120)

Lomography Color Negative 400 is one of those alternative color films that unfortunately isn’t spoken about enough. And for some of us, that’s perfectly fine. I’m okay with all the haters of Lomography refusing to understand what the company is doing and saving more film for me. Walking into the West Village store in NYC to be greeted warmly by the employees and always having the ability to buy some simply makes me happier. And all the folks who only shoot digital and only care about shooting digital can keep doing so. They’ll never understand the awesome secret that the rest of us know that is ironically being published on one of the biggest indie photo blogs on the web.

That’s all just fine.

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Review: Tamron SP 70-200mm F2.8 Di VC USD G2 (Canon EF)

The Tamron SP 70-200mm F2.8 Di VC USD G2 is an entry point into one of the most popular telephoto zoom lens options out there–and it’s actually a damned fantastic one. Tamron has always created lenses that are high quality, affordable, and built pretty well.But with the Tamron SP 70-200mm F2.8 Di VC USD G2, they’re seriously taking the cake here. This lens offers weather sealing, the same top notch image quality that they’ve been pushing with the new SP lineup of lenses, and image stabilization to boot. So if you’re a portrait photographer, we’re already well aware that you’ve been eyeing a 70-200mm f2.8 lens of some sort.

And if you’re looking for an affordable option, then this is it.

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