Chris Gampat Chris Gampat

All articles by Chris Gampat

 

The Intrepid 4×5 Mk 3 Large Format Camera Gets a Minor Update

A few years ago, the Intrepid 4×5 camera went to Kickstarter to get crowd funded. Now, the camera is in its third version and the company is still preaching the idea of high quality at a fraction of the price of other cameras. According to the press release, the new Intrepid Mk3 “…sees the addition of leaf springs to securely hold the ground glass/film holders, rear standard tilt and swing and a much larger baseplate for use with all tripod mounts (1/4 and 3/8).” Though that sounds minor, it adds a whole lot more in terms of the durability and lifespan of the camera. Of course you still need to use your own lenses, tripods, etc. But you’re getting the body frame, the ground glass, the bellows, etc. More tech specs are after the jump....
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Useful Photography Tip #184: How to Find the ISO Button of Most Cameras in the Dark

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Click here. You’re in a bind; you’re in a dark place and you’re trying to find the ISO button on your camera. What do you do? Some folks end up pressing buttons until they get to exactly what they want. But if you’ve got a camera with a dedicated ISO button,...
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Review: Tamron 70-210mm f4 Di VC USD (Canon EF)

When testing the Tamron 70-210mm f4 Di VC USD, I had a whole lot of hope. The company’s lenses have been stellar and they’ve been winning many awards. But when it came to working with this lens, things were just off. The quality of the optics is fantastic as always. But where I saw issues was with performance–not only on the Canon 6D Mk II but with a Sony a7r III and a Metabones adapter. It could do the job, but with varying success that other lenses of similar types and focal lengths could do. With that said though, the Tamron 70-210mm f4 Di VC USD isn’t at all a bad lens–it’s just one that I’d probably relegate just to studio work and sports with lots of bright light....
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Opinion: What I’d Love to See in a Full Frame Ricoh GR Camera Body

There is a hope amongst many photographers out there: that one day a full frame Ricoh GR camera body might actually make it out into the world. It’s the dream of many a photographer, especially those in the street photography community. But otherwise, it would also just be nice for those who travel and want a compact camera with solid image quality to tote around. This lust comes partially from just how good their film point and shoot cameras still are even today. They still sell for a lot of money online and even though their last Ricoh GR II was a solid camera, it’s time to upgrade to something even better....
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The Lomography Diana Instant Square Camera is Their Most Perplexing Camera Yet

Today, Lomography is lifting the veil in something that they should have done a long time ago (sort of) with the Lomography Diana Instant Square Camera. In my mind, it makes sense; but the implementation also is just a tad perplexing. The Lomography Diana Instant Square Camera of course incorporates the use of square film and gives you aperture control and focusing control over the lens with the Diana camera’s 1/60th shutter speed. Mixed with the ISO 800 film, that’s generally all that you need in some situations. However, this negates Lomo’s claim of it being fully manual–it isn’t. But I really wonder why Lomo just didn’t stick with Mini in this case....
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Thanks for Preset Syncing, Adobe. It Took You Long Enough…

There are two different camps and trains of thought when it comes to presets with Adobe Lightroom. Some photographers scoff at them, instead stating that they’re going to use their own knowledge to get to the solution and not going to make it easy. More often than not, those photographers fail pretty hard. It’s a stubbornness if not a very specific creative vision that these photographers have for themselves. But those who embrace presets either genuinely like the look, are wannabe film photographers, or use them to satisfy clients. And for that reason and for those photographers, preset syncing is huge....
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Review: Tamron 28-75mm f2.8 Di III RXD (Sony FE)

Generally speaking, I’m not one that likes zoom lenses; but when I considered what the Tamron 28-75mm f2.8 Di III RXD is then I didn’t mind it all that much. The talks about autofocus issues are in my opinion highly over exaggerated as I personally didn’t see them with my unit. In fact, I didn’t suffer from any real autofocus issues at all. To that end, the Tamron 28-75mm f2.8 Di III RXD focused better on the Sony a7r III than their lenses have focused on Canon DSLRs in my years of testing Tamron’s newest lenses. These lenses have been emphasizing new philosophy within Tamron that gives each unit a silver ring around the mount, weather sealing, a new finish, and a number of major enhancements. While the world talks of Sigma this and Sigma that, I often like to remind folks that Tamron also isn’t doing a bad job....
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A Quick Visual Reference of How Much Light a Full Frame Sensor Absorbs Vs an APS-C Sensor

While testing out the Rokinon 50mm f1.4 AF for the Sony a7r III and the Fujifilm X-H1, I was shooting with f1.4 lenses on both cameras. When exposing scenes at ISO 6400 and shooting wide open at f1.4 with similar metering, I came across something that I found was pretty crazy. To verify it, I showed it to a buddy of mine who works for a pretty famous camera store. When he saw it himself, he was pretty shocked. I knew for years that full frame sensors tend to absorb more light per pixel and have better color overall–but I’ve never had a visual difference otherwise until recently....
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Cameras and Lenses Don’t Take Bad Photos; People Take Bad Photos

The statement I often like to make is that in this economy, no product developer is going to their managers and purposely trying to pitch ideas that they think will fail and that won’t bring their company any profits. That just doesn’t happen anymore, and overall companies are all making very good products. It’s impossible to take bad pictures with them unless you know nothing about taking pictures. And even then, many of these products have an automatic mode that makes it really straightforward. Instead, some companies just aren’t choosing to innovate and keep up with others; and I think that we all know whom we’re talking about here....
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Coming Soon: The Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 500mm f5.6E PF ED VR

So if all the stars align just right, I think that one of the big announcements that we’re going to see this year from Nikon will be the new Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 500mm f5.6E PF ED VR that they’re announcing the development of today. This lens is designed to be a “lightweight” 500mm prime lens for photographers who want something like that for their big, heavy, clunky DSLR camera. This announcement is only that of the fact that the lens is being developed. Why? If I really had to guess, it’s to tease photographers to let them know that something big is coming from them later on this year. And it’s a whole lot better than what Kodak has been doing with teasing us about the existence of Ektachrome recently....
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Review: 7Artisans 35mm f2 (Leica M Mount, Used on Sony FE)

Let me get this right out of the way, the 7Artisans 35mm f2 lens isn’t as good as Leica’s. You’re getting better sharpness, detail, and bokeh in pretty much every way and at every aperture. But the 7Artisans 35mm f2 isn’t at all bad; and it can still render very gorgeous images. Being a Chinese lens, there are surely folks out there who may doubt how capable it is. But I can assure you that unless you had other lenses side by side or were very familiar with other optics, you wouldn’t really be able to tell the difference between the 7Artisans 35mm f2 and other offerings when it comes to image quality. But when it comes to the ergonomics, there are surely differences....
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My Wishlist: What I Want in the Fujifilm X Pro 3

I’ve never found it reasonable to constantly upgrade to the next generation of cameras that come out, and that’s why I’ve been holding out for the Fujifilm X Pro 3. I still own the Fujifilm X Pro 1, and to this day it is in my eyes one of the best cameras ever made in the past 10 years. The image quality still holds up as you can easily make the raw files look like film or have them be really high end. While Sony cameras are what I’d use for most of my work, Fujifilm is what I use for studio projects and for my hobby photography. I’ve always preferred the rangefinder style of cameras as they simply just conform better to my hands....
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Review: MiNT InstantKon RF70 (Fujifilm Instax Wide and Manual Controls)

I’ve been playing with the MiNT InstantKon RF70 for a while now purposely taking my time with it in order to ensure that I didn’t miss anything. This camera is, in my opinion, the most important Instant film camera to have been released in the past few years. It makes use of the less popular Instax Wide format, and it also allows the photographer to have full manual control over the image. The MiNT InstantKon RF70 has a lens with aperture controls and manual focusing utilizing a rangefinder. There is a light meter built in, and the camera is overall pretty lightweight and compact. There isn’t a whole lot to complain about thus far–except for the fact that there are a few things that really concern me....
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Inside the Photographer’s Mind: Jonathan Higbee

Jonathan Higbee was our latest guest on Inside the Photographer’s Mind, and he was able to keep a full audience of folks enthralled with his words and experiences on what it’s like to be a modern street photographer. Jonathan is a rare breed, he’s a street photographer who actually makes his living from it. He isn’t an influencer, he isn’t sponsored by any sort of companies and the moment of publishing this post: he makes print sales. In fact, it’s 90% of his income....
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The New Canon 70-200mm Lens Updates are Very Perplexing

Oh Canon, what are you doing? Today, the company is announcing that they’re making changes to both of their 70-200mm lenses. The more common changes amongst both are that they’re getting a newer white exterior to fully match the other telephoto L lenses in their lineup. In terms of consistency, that makes sense in their lineup. Then there are new coatings on their lenses. But otherwise when it comes to the Canon 70-200mm f2.8 L III IS USM, those are the big, major changes. The optics are the same as the previous lens. Why? Well, I guess Canon believes that the optics are good enough or they’re confident enough to say that it will be able to resolve the resolution of any sensors that they happen to be creating later on....
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KONO! Has Two New Black and White Film Emulsions for Analog Photographers

KONO! has always been a bit of a quirky company when it comes to their film emulsions; but they have to embrace this in order to actually stand out from the digital world that continues to try to emulate the look of film as much as it tries and fails. Today, they’re announcing two new film emulsions: KONO! Rekorder and KONO! Monolit 64. These are still in line with their quirkiness and identity as a company....
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TONIGHT! Tune in on Facebook Live to Our Chat With Jonathan Higbee

TONIGHT: Street photographer Jonathan Higbee is our next guest on Inside the Photographer’s Mind. Street photographer Jonathan Higbee is one of New York’s up and coming photographers who not only has an interesting approach to street photography but also has a very curious background in photography. He doesn’t only shoot street, he shoots surreal work and has...
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Film Scanner Review: Kodak Scanza

I’ve reviewed options like the Kodak Scanza before that I genuinely wish were higher in quality, but what you’re getting for the most part isn’t really all that awful. It takes your 35mm film and can deliver for you up to 22MP still image JPEG files. If you want TIFFs or DNG files, then you’ll need something significantly higher end that is bound to take up more real estate on your desk. But if you just want to scan your photos, it’s seriously tough to beat the Kodak Scanza. It works via a simple interface that takes your film, gives you an immediate preview with color corrections, and allows you to scan by simply pressing a button. These images are then put onto an SD card or onto your computer directly. This all sounds fantastic, except that the Kodak Scanza suffers from a few design issues that are holding back my highest recommendations....
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A Visual Guide to How 35mm, 50mm and 85mm Lenses Differ For Portrait Photography

Photographers who love taking portraits have most likely experimented with a variety of focal lengths; or they’re at least curious about what each does for the genre. Popular focal lengths include 85mm, but in the past few years 50mm and 35mm lenses have become better and better when it comes to portraiture. They have less distortion and overall just have a more pleasing look about them. Today, every manufacturer makes good lenses; and when it comes to portraiture the only thing to keep in mind is what sort of portrait you want to create....
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The Slower Lens on the Sony RX100 VI May Turn Bokeh Lovers Off

With the new announcement of the Sony RX100 VI camera, there comes with it a number of great technologies but also a number of tradeoffs. Before I go on, I should state that I’ve spent a few minutes with the new camera and that I get to play with it more later on. But right off the bat, I’ve got a number of theories....
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A Quick Look at Ilford Delta 3200 vs Kodak TMax P3200

In the analog film world, there are two big high ISO black and white films in existence: Ilford Delta 3200 and Kodak TMax P3200. They’re both much different films, but they’re also both black and white. It recently came to our attention that folks would love to see some sort of comparison of both. And so we decided to go through our archives of testing to bring you some of our thoughts....
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Psst…The Magnum Photos Square Print Sale is Back

There’s some good news folks, the Magnum Square Print Sale is back on for a limited amount of time. This sale happened not too long ago for a few days and Magnum has decided to do it again. Photographers from all across the Magnum Archives are being featured; but primarily the year 1968 is being showcased. It was a very big one with things like MLK being assassinated, the Vietnam war, and much more. Magnum’s press release is after the jump....
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These Fantastic Prime Portrait Lenses Aren’t 85mm; You’ll Love Them

Most photographers seem to reach for 85mm lenses when it comes to their choice amongst portrait lenses. But some photographers genuinely need something longer or shorter at times and also much prefer prime lenses to many others out there. 85mm lenses are absolutely fantastic, but sometimes one needs more versatility. There are moments where you can surely use something longer and other moments where you’d want something shorter. We dove into our reviews index to find some of our favorites....
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The Mint InstantKon RF70 All Manual Instax Camera Gets Official Details; Pre-Order in June

Perhaps one of the most anticipated cameras for many photographers could be the new Mint InstantKon RF70. I’ve personally wanted a camera that could shoot Fujifilm Instax Wide emulsions and give me full manual controls for many years. That’s here now; and I genuinely hope that it prompts both Lomography and Fujifilm to get with it. I’ve been personally playing with the Mint InstantKon RF70 for around tow weeks now and we’ve known about it for many months. Today, MiNT is releasing all the details....
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Review: Fujifilm Instax Square SQ6 (Fujifilm Instax Square)

With the Fujifilm Instax Square SQ6’s arrival on the scene, Fujifilm I feel has created a respectable Instax Square camera. When the SQ10 was released, I was very hesitant. I’m not a fan of a digital photo being printed onto an Instax frame from the camera. By and large, I prefer full pass through of light through the lens to the film plane. Somehow, Fujifilm was able to create it in a compact form factor that is also very stylish. In many ways, the Fujifilm Instax Square SQ6 is what the Instax Mini 90 is but with the Square format. ...
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Op Ed: What I’d Love to See in a Nikon Full Frame Mirrorless Camera

When the reports of a brand new Nikon Full Frame Mirrorless Camera were hitting the newswires, I became very excited at the possibilities. It means that Nikon is once again doing something incredibly brave since the creation of their 1 Series cameras and even with making all their newest lenses part of their new E moniker. They’re going to surely be gunning after Sony, Fujifilm, Olympus and Panasonic and so we came up with a few possibilities that could present itself in this new camera....
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Listen to How Jonathan Higbee Creates Beautiful Street Photography LIVE

Street photographer Jonathan Higbee is our next guest on Inside the Photographer’s Mind. Street photographer Jonathan Higbee is one of New York’s up and coming photographers who not only has an interesting approach to street photography but also has a very curious background in photography. He doesn’t only shoot street, he shoots surreal work and has used...
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What I Want in a Canon Full Frame Mirrorless Camera

With Photokina 2018 just around the corner, it would be insane if a Canon Full Frame Mirrorless Camera wasn’t launched. The company hasn’t taken mirrorless very seriously for years now; but they’ve started to ramp up their EOS M lineup of cameras and lenses. It’s only a matter of time until they release a full frame camera though. With a number of very decent DSLR cameras, Canon has enough technology to either recycle parts into a Canon Full Frame Mirrorless Camera or even create something completely new to show us things to come. To get ready for the launch, I put together a few wishes for what I’d love to see in a Canon Full Frame Mirrorless Camera....
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First Impressions: MiNT InstantKon RF70 (Fujifilm Instax Wide)

The previously stated sentence is one that I’ve had in my mind for quite some time now; as I genuinely have been mulling over about the new MiNT InstantKon RF70. This is the first camera to give the photographer full control over the shutter speed and the aperture in addition to providing the photographer with a working meter and using Instax Wide film. It baffles me still in understanding why it took this long for it to happen. I’m sure that others are going to try to copy this; but the MiNT InstantKon RF70 is the single camera that I’ve been wanting for years and am incredibly excited about. So when MiNT sent it over to me for reviewing, I was overjoyed....
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Digital Rot: On the Long Term Value of Digital Photography and Modern Photography Gear

One of the reasons why I still hold onto my Canon 5D Mk II is because it’s pretty much worthless for me to sell it at this point. I’ve done the same thing for my Sony a7 and Fujifilm X Pro 1–except that those are cameras that I use on a fairly regular basis. But for photographers who want to switch from one system to another, there are more problems than you’d think. In many cases it has determined why someone purchases one piece of equipment over and another, and yet what happens is that cameras, and not necessarily the accessories around them, get the most digital rot....
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Henri-Cartier Bresson’s Best Decisive Moments on Display at ICP

When we speak about Bresson, we often associate him with the idea of the Decisive Moment. But as I learned on a tour of one of the newest exhibits at International Center of Photography, he actually hated that name. The exhibit itself is coined “The Decisive Moment” but to Bresson, he believed that there are many moments instead. The artistic photographer also really wishes that his now famous book would have instead been called something along the lines of “Images on the Run.” Indeed, this is a bit more like what we see of Bresson’s work–at least in some of his most famous images....
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Quick Apple iPhone Camera App Review: Obscura

We’ve been playing with the brand new Obscura app for almost a month now playing with it in the beta mode. First off, it’s not at all going to replace Instagram for you as there is no social feature of any sort. In fact, it may not really even replace your regular shooting and editing process. But what it will do is provide you with a bit of fun at least at first. Though to be honest, you’re probably better off simply skipping this app altogether....
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The New Fujifilm X-T100 Comes in Gold for Some Reason

There’s a brand new Fujifilm camera on the market: the Fujifilm X-T100. More than anything else, it’s aiming at the entry level photography crowd with its gold, black and silver color options. But in addition to that, it gives photographers most of the features that the company’s higher end cameras called their own but isn’t anywhere as feature packed as something like the Fujifilm X-H1. Crammed into the new Fujifilm X-T100 is the company’s 24.2MP APS-C sensor–and it isn’t X Trans. There’s a 3″ LCD screen, ISO 200-51,200, 4K video, Bluetooth. WiFi, and a battery life of approximate 430 images according to Fujifilm’s claims....
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We’ve Done a Massive Update to Our Sigma Prime Lens Guide; Check it Out!

We’ve launched a pretty massive update to our Sigma Prime Lens guide that we’ve been curating and updating for years now. As it is, we are the only photography speciality publication that has tested every single Sigma prime lens on the market. Since creating this guide years ago, we’ve been steadily updating it as we’ve reviewed more and more lenses. This not only includes some of Sigma’s latest offerings from the Global Vision program, but also some older options for those of you looking at the second hand market....
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The Secret to Using Color to Make Your Images Look Sharper

Of course we can all sit here and talk about sharpness of a lens and megapixels all day–but this article isn’t about that. What if you have only a camera, a lens, and perhaps some light–that’s it? What do you do in a situation like that. Well, the secret to creating a sharper image isn’t necessarily all that technological stuff but instead it’s all about utilizing the effectiveness of the human eye. Yes, you can fool the eye into thinking that a scene is sharper than it really is. That’s what this entire tutorial is all about....
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Op Ed: Working with a 28mm Lens as a 35mm Fanatic

It was the Sony 28mm f2 FE lens that first seriously introduced me to 28mm lenses, but it was the Nikon 28mm f1.4 that made me really fall in love with them and the Leica 28mm f1.4 that solidified that even further. As a 35mm lens user, it was always nice to be able to look to a scene, put the camera to my face, and shoot a scene that I saw exactly the way that I saw it. But when moving around and walking, I’ve learned how to think in 28mm. You know what I’m talking about–you see a scene and you have a vision and somehow or another you know exactly what you’ll be getting from it with the lens and equipment you have. I’ve learned how to use it for anything from landscapes, street photography and even wider portraits. Though I’m still a 35mm man at heart, I can easily switch off when needed....
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How Ilford Delta 400 Became My Favorite Film for Street Photography

This is a syndicated blog post from La Noir Image.  I wish that when I first started exploring street photography with film that someone had told me all about Ilford Delta 400 before trying to shepherd me into the church of Kodak Tri-X. But back then, years and years of guides online said that it...
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Six of the Best Camera Bags for Photographers Living in Cities

Nothing feels worse than being underprepared for a shoot or having a piece of equipment not work when you’re out in the field shooting photos. Part of this is sometimes caused by ineffective protection from camera bags–trust me I’d know. For a long time, I couldn’t find a camera bag that I really liked and so I tried to modify and make my own. But what so many camera bags have that differentiates them from everyone else is ways to weather seal the contents of the bag. On top of that, there is usually some sort of padding that will protect your gear from bumps, falls, etc. These are absolutely essential when you’re a photographer traveling in a city and often taking public transportation or even walking and riding a bike. So we went through our reviews and rounded up some of our favorite bags just for you....
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The Beauty of Light Leaks: Playing with DUBBLE Film Sunstroke

For years, photographers tried to negate or reduce the effect of light leaks on their film; but we began to embrace it after some time and now we’ve got DUBBLE Film Sunstroke. This film is a Kodak emulsion that has had light leaks hit it in just the right spots. Your images will otherwise come out completely normal except that they’ve got these light leaked patterns on them. This isn’t new–pre-exposed film and other cool effects have been around for years. But it’s only since the start of the Analog Renaissance did we actually try to do this again....
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American Dream: Rydell Tomas Jr’s Photographs Strangers on Film

Hi, my name is Rydell Tomas Jr and I’m an upcoming freelance photographer from the Southside of Atlanta, Ga. I’ve been making photos for two years and I’ve been putting together conceptual projects since July of 2017. I started photographing through my love of filmmaking, and after realizing I truly enjoyed making photos, I dropped filmmaking altogether. I love people, so majority of my work focuses on strangers, friends and family. I currently shoot with a 1957 Leica M3 w/ 50mm Serenar and 1986 Yashica Fx-3 Super 2000 w/ 50mm Yashinon. 35mm Film is my favorite and i try to use of many film stocks as possible. My favorites are Kodak Gold 200 and Kodak Tri-X 400....
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Field Report: Working with the Silberra Pan Film Lineup

I have to admit that I’m really excited when a new film manufacturer pops up or a company announces a new film emulsion: and Silberra is a key example of this. The company has an ISO 50, 100, 160, and 200 film in black and white. Something that I was really concerned about though is just how they were going to distinguish themselves from all the rest. I mean, when Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 came out, I was able to see how it stacks up against the rest. It’s a much different film that means that it should be used in a different way. Kodak has Tri-X and T-Max, Lomography has the Grey series, and Ilford has an incredibly large stable of black and white film emulsions. So with Silberra, there needed to be something incredibly special about their film....
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Fujifilm Is Replacing Its 24 Exposure Superia and Fujicolor Rolls with 36 Exposures

Usually, when were hear any word about Fujifilm and good ol’ analog film, it’s in relation to the discontinuation. But in this case, it’s more of a replacement. Fujifilm sent notice out today to retailers that they’re discontinuing their 24 exposure rolls and replacing them with 36 exposure rolls. This notice is specifically about their ISO 200 and 400 rolls of film. Fujifilm does not make these film emulsions in 120 format anymore, only in 35mm....
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Lens Review: Leica 28mm f1.4 Summilux (M Mount)

The Leica 28mm f1.4 Summilux was offered to me to test after requesting it a long time ago; and I genuinely never thought that I’d fall for it. I’d probably never buy it brand new as I prefer my lenses and cameras to have what we Americans love to call “Patina” to them; and even as it is I’m pretty well set on the M mount lenses that I currently own. The Leica 28mm f1.4 Summilux is quite possibly the ultimate photojournalist’s lens. It has a fast aperture, a solid build quality, and is surprisingly sharp at every single aperture. But even that isn’t the secret sauce to what makes this lens so incredibly special....
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20 Foolproof Tips on How to Take Better Candid Portraits

First and foremost, candid portraits often require one of two things: either a lot of trust in the photographer or a really stealthy photographer that absolutely cannot be seen or heard. This is what many aspire to be: the fly on the wall. But if you can’t be this type of photographer, here’s how you can become more like it....
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The Fujifilm Instax SQ6 and Instax Square Black Film Are Now a Thing

It was only a matter of time until we got another Fujifilm Instax Square camera; and this time around we’re being treated to the Fujifilm Instax SQ6. This is the company’s second Instax Square camera–and with it is also their new Instax Square Black frame film that’s coming out too. The new Fujifilm Instax SQ6 comes in white, gold or grey. It has a 65mm f12.6 lens on the front and from what the tech specs are telling us thus far, it seems like it’s going to be another one of those plastic fantastic cameras from Fujifilm....
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This Photographer Shot a Large Format Camera While Flying in a Plane as Part of a Bet

“The whole thing came out of a bit of a bet.” says Sebastian Schweers about shooting from an airplane with a large format camera. At ISO 100, f8 and 1/250th, Sebastian was able to get this pretty cool photo opening this story. Sebastian has an interesting family history with photography being a big part of it and aviation being another large part. So when Sebastian shared this image, we were able to get in contact with him and asked him for a feature....
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The Panasonic LUMIX TS7 Can Shoot in Over 100 Feet of Water

It’s been a good while since we’ve seen a solid new weatherproofed camera of some sort, but this newest option from Panasonic seems to be taking the cake in many respects. It’s waterproof in up to 102 ft of water; but it’s also dustproof. It can absorb up to a 6.6 foot fall and it can continue to work in 14 degrees F and survive 220lbs of pressure. On top of that there’s also Wifi, an LED photo light and a Live Viewfinder....
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Daniel Fjäll: “Photography Isn’t Instagram…”

“Photography isn’t Instagram.” says Photographer Daniel Fjäll. “I think it’s important people try something new and break away from the trends. Think for themselves. That’s when the good stuff comes to you. I hope some of my pictures will spark someone’s inspiration. Also that you can still do photography even if you don’t travel the world if you work with what you got.” ...
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The Hasselblad XCD 21mm f4 Lens Renders a 17mm Field of View for $3,750

Photographers who choose to pay the seriously high price tag of the Hasselblad X series cameras and lenses will be delighted to know that more of their hard earned money can potentially go to the Hasselblad XCD 21mm f4. This lens delivers a 17mm full frame in 35mm field of view, and is the widest lens to be delivered to the Hasselblad mirrorless system so far. What you need to know is that the lens can focus as closely at 32cm and that they’re targeting it at landscape and interior photographers. The press release is after the jump....
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Useful Photography Tip #183: The Trick Your Sony Camera Has That You’re Probably Not Using

Photographers who want better metering of their scene should know that Sony has a bit more science to their camera metering system than you’d think. Besides the more traditional center weighted, spot metering (which can be linked to the focusing point) and evaluative metering modes there is another another option called “Entire Screen Average.” To figure out how that works, we asked Sony’s Mark Weir about just how exactly the algorithms do their magic. “Entire Screen Averaging meters the entire frame, but differs from Multi-pattern metering by eliminating the weighting on any individual segment.” says Mark. “The idea is to avoid any shifts in exposure that might be influenced by slight changes in composition.”...
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