Chris Gampat Chris Gampat

All articles by Chris Gampat

 

Inside the Photographer’s Mind: Ira Block

It was a pleasure speaking with Ira Block–a photographer who says that he’s mastered both the creative side and documentary side of his craft at the moment due to his wanting to continually push himself forward and always create different images. Ira joined us in front of a Live Studio audience at the Adorama Event Space to discuss a lot about his background, how and why he creates, and to share a few key stories about his travels over the years. Ira also showcased lots of his new work in his book Cuba Loves Baseball: a Photographic Journey....
Continue reading...  

Question: Why Do Photographers Still Need Tripods?

I’m going to preface this post by saying once again, no this isn’t an ad of some sort. Our policies on sponsored content are very clear and they’re also clearly labelled. But instead, this is more of an insight into the evolution of photographers. Years ago, having a tripod was an absolute requirement. You’d put a camera on a tripod to ensure that your images were blur free due to your coffee drinking habits. That way you’d get a crisp images at ISO 50 10 seconds and f8 to the best of your ability. But then photography evolved and lenses started to become image stabilized. It got better and better and these days photographers don’t necessarily require tripods with them all the time. Plus now there is image stabilization built into camera sensors for the most part. So with all that tech supporting your ability to take a good picture, why do you need a tripod?...
Continue reading...  

Ryan Struck Photographs Adventure with Kodak Aerochrome Film

One of the things that I really enjoy doing is follow up interviews with photographers to showcase to you readers how they’ve grown and made themselves into success stories–and in the case of photographer Ryan Struck you’ll have a giant smile on your face. We interviewed Ryan years ago about the lifestyle surfing work that he does here on the East Coast. The last time I saw him, he packed up and left New York and moved about. He’s back now, and Ryan is showcasing a special project that he did called World of Color. This project showcases his travels to various places all shot with the elusive Kodak Aerochrome film. ...
Continue reading...  

Tomorrow: Inside the Photographer’s Mind with Ira Block

DON’T FORGET: Sony Artisan and National Geographic Photographer Ira Block is our next big guest Hey folks, just a reminder about tomorrow’s Inside the Photographer’s Mind event! Photographer Ira Block has over 300,000 followers on Instagram–and part of it is obviously due to his fantastic work as a photographer over the years. A native New...
Continue reading...  

Does the Bayer Filter on an Image Sensor Make a Photo Less Sharp?

In some circles of photography, film is really the only option on attaining maximum sharpness from a lens–and those circles may attribute the problem to a Bayer Filter. I mean look at it this way: the Leica Monochrom offers such incredibly sharp photos because of the lack of a Bayer filter. So that has to be the case, right? Well, not really....
Continue reading...  

Film Emulsion Review: CineStill bwXX Black and White Film (35mm)

I’ve forever been on the hunt for a black and white film that I’m truly, madly in love with; and while CineStill bwXX comes really close, I’d like to think that the Ilford Delta lineup of film is still more my taste. But with that said, I can’t really find any sort of major fault with CineStill bwXX as it’s more or less a film designed for cinema and repackaged for 35mm still film camera consumption. Photographers that want the look of some really classic old time cinema may really enjoy what CineStill bwXX. Is it sharp? It can be. Is it grainy? Oh yeah. Does it have those deeply inky blacks that I really enjoy? Heck yes. In fact, photographers who like to take their images and max the contrast after a black and white conversion will really enjoy CineStill bwXX. The film also pushes decently well and most of all, I feel like it has a distinct look vs Kodak T-Max, Tri-x, and much of what Ilford offers out there....
Continue reading...  

Wishlist: What I’d Love to See in the Sony a7s III When it Comes Out

With the Sony a7r III and Sony a7 III already on the market, it’s only a matter of time until the Sony a7s III comes out. The Sony a7s series of cameras have always been about video, high ISO output being fantastic, solid autofocus, and of course better video than the other options out there. Videographers have surely used it, but photographers have always used it because of the fantastic high ISO abilities for what it is. So we’ve come up with a few predictions and wishes for what we’d love in the camera when it launches....
Continue reading...  

Why These Professional Photographers Still Print Their Photos

For some photographers, printing is the ultimate way of displaying their photos. It brings the image to life, manifest, makes it tangible and ends up just making the photo a thing that you can cherish for forever. It isn’t lost amongst a giant number of other images in a gallery on your phone, but instead it’s just there. It’s a much different experience that commands someone to sit there and look at the photo. That image is the one that stands out amongst the rest....
Continue reading...  

National Geographic Photographer Ira Block is Our Next Guest on Inside the Photographer’s Mind

Photographer Ira Block has over 300,000 followers on Instagram–and part of it is obviously due to his fantastic work as a photographer over the years. A native New Yorker, one of his first big assignments took him to one of the coldest places in the world and put him with people with whom he didn’t even speak the same language. But there’s so much more to how Ira has evolved as a photographer and some of his personal experiences that he’d love to share with you. Ira will be our next guest on Inside the Photographer’s Mind: part of our collaborative series with Adorama TV. You can catch us on April 18th at 5PM EST live on Facebook, or you can join us at the Adorama Event Space here in NYC....
Continue reading...  

The Cameras of Stephen Shore: On Display at the MoMA NY

Photographer Stephen Shore needs no introduction for many of you who’ve studied the greats out there; he’ll well known in various circles as an incredible landscape photographer, candid photographer, and for his documentary work including that of Andy Warhol. His exhibition currently on display at the MoMA NY (Ends on May 28th 2018) showcases a number of these images across a span of rooms and in various sizes and formats. Towards the end of the exhibit, a room includes some of the cameras that he’s used over the years. They correspond to the exhibit and many of the descriptions as Mr. Shore chose to move from 35mm to large format and finally digital later on in his career. Part of these moves are because Mr. Shore wanted to make larger prints after some time; then to keep up with the times he switched to digital. Stephen still believes that all photographers should start out with film though, and considering his evolution it’s quite fascinating....
Continue reading...  

This 50 Image Composite of Hong Kong’s Sunset Looks Like a Gorgeous Painting

Photographer Lucan Coutts is quite obviously a fantastic photographer not only from his beautiful vistas, but from his conceptual work too. It’s not often that we see conceptual landscape or cityscape photography, but when it happens it’s often absolutely jaw dropping as the process involves the skill of both capturing and creating instead of one or the other. That’s what Lucan created in this case when he shared this image of Hong Kong as it transitioned to sunset....
Continue reading...  

Opinion: There is Nothing Wrong with Image Grain and Your Photos Don’t Need to Be 100% Sharp

Image grain and sharpness are two things in the photo community that when you get into the more old school circles of thinking, is frowned upon. You’ll always hear “You should’ve gotten it in focus” or “You should’ve shot at a lower ISO setting.” It’s ingrained (pun intended) into the heads of so many photographers out there and that mentality continues to spread to so many others. But the truth is that technical matters of a photo are second to the subject matter. ...
Continue reading...  

The Focus and Recompose Method: An Introduction for Photographers

Cameras these days have a gillion autofocus points, so why would you choose to focus and recompose a scene instead? If you’re new to photography, you’ve probably never thought about or knew about the focus and recompose method at all. Focus and recompose is a method that photographers have been using for years before autofocus and even when autofocus came around, it was more or less designed to be used alongside the Focus and recompose method of shooting photos. To do the Focus and recompose method, you essentially choose a focusing point, place it on the subject, focus the camera, recompose the scene and then shoot. In most cases, photographers tend to use the middle focusing point. With high megapixel cameras, this feature has become more and more valuable because you can simply crop the image to bits if you wish. But lots of photographers don’t know or understand how to properly Focus and recompose....
Continue reading...  

7 Beautiful Camera Straps with Both Functionality and Good Looks

There are a number of great leather and canvas camera straps out there on the market. Some have been Kickstarted while others started all on their own. But the problem that many folks complain about with these straps is that they’re too pretty and often not functional enough. Well, say no more. These camera straps are bound to impress you....
Continue reading...  

Review: Sony 18-135mm f3.5-5.6 OSS (Sony E Mount)

If you’re a user of the Sony a6000 series cameras, then you can probably imagine yourself using a lens like the Sony 18-135mm f3.5-5.6 OSS. A lens like this is targeted squarely at the photographers who travel and for those who want a lens designed for a hobbyist. Want to photograph your kids? What about candid moments? The way I see it, the folks who would buy the Sony 18-135mm f3.5-5.6 OSS would probably take their Sony a6500 or a6300 and set it on auto or some sort of scene mode to shoot. Now that’s not to say that those are the only people who may use it, but that’s who I imagine most of the buyers will be. With the variable apertures, image stabilization and a range of focal lengths, I can’t say that I blame them. In fact, I clearly see the Sony 18-135mm f3.5-5.6 OSS being offered as a kit zoom of some sort. That’s where this lens probably belongs....
Continue reading...  

Behold the ProGrade Digital 1TB CFexpress 1.0 Memory Card (and More!)

If you’ve got a camera that has an XQD slot of some sort, you should be aware of a big new change coming to the industry, and it apparently starts with the new ProGrade Digital 1TB CFexpress. Yes, that’s right: 1 Terabyte of storage will be available for cards like this. The company is showing off the card at CP+ very soon, and is looking to make a big splash by not only doing something brand new, but also creating a memory card that’s got an absolutely massive storage. All the important specs are below for the ProGrade Digital 1TB CFexpress and their new SDXC UHS-II U3 cards....
Continue reading...  

Smartphone Review: Huawei Mate 10 Pro (Apple Had Better Be Scared of the Camera)

When the Huawei Mate 10 Pro was announced, I saw it as just another good phone from Huawei–but what I didn’t know is just how much more I’d really like the camera vs the iPhone’s. I’m an Apple iPhone 8 Plus user and I’ve been an Apple smartphone user for around four or so years now. I was originally an Android user, and with the Huawei Mate 10 Pro I experienced some of the first wonderlust that I had when I first moved to Android from a regular flip phone back years ago....
Continue reading...  

If You Buy This Canon 50mm f0.95 on eBay, Know That It’s Stolen

A few weeks ago, photographer Daniel Zvereff told me a story about how his Canon 50mm f0.95 lens got stolen while on a trip in Mexico–and today the lens has appeared on eBay for sale. Daniel, who has been featured here on the site many times, has done some fantastic Kodak Aerochrome work, and is currently in our zine, spotted the lens just today and reached out to tell us about it. It was stolen unfortunately when thieves snuck into where he was staying and snatched the lens up....
Continue reading...  

Review: Sony 16-35mm f2.8 G Master FE (Sony E Mount, Full Frame)

Though the decision to make the Sony 16-35mm f2.8 G Master FE still sort of baffles me, but I can’t deny that it’s still a very good lens for professional photography. When I think about wide angle f2.8 full frame zoom lenses I think of both the 16-35mm and the 14-24mm. And for the life of me, I’m not exactly sure why Sony chose 16-35mm. Could it be because they’re going after Canon? At this point, I’m not sure that they need to. A 14-24mm would have rounded out their options very well. Nonetheless, Sony’s decision is their own, and the company made a lens that is very well worth being ranked amongst some of the best zoom lenses out there. With weather sealing and sharpness being a paramount here, the Sony 16-35mm f2.8 G Master FE is a fantastic lens for the professional photographer....
Continue reading...  

Review: Sony 24-105mm f4 G OSS (Sony E, Full Frame)

If you were to take the Sony 24-105mm f4 G OSS and compare it to the company’s G Master lenses, then I’d feel like you’re doing it an injustice in some ways. Nevertheless, this is a lens that will be compared to them simply because of the fact that every other manufacturer has an offering that rates it amongst their best lenses. Indeed, the Sony 24-105mm f4 G OSS is quite a great lens for the travel photographer, but it’s on G glass. It has weather sealing, but isn’t as sealed as some of the company’s other offerings. It has a great range, but maxes out at f4. For some photographers this will be a problem. But for photographers who travel, this is perhaps one of the best lenses you can get for your Sony camera....
Continue reading...  

What Photographers Should Know About Travelling with Film

Over the past few years, I’ve decided to give film a shot–not just domestically here in NYC, but also with international travel. Most photographers haven’t done this in years, but with film photography back on the rise, there are great reasons to travel with it. Documenting the deserts of the United States or the streets of Bangkok in Kodak emulsions are bound to give you images that you’re going to be so incredibly proud of partially because you worked so much harder to get them. Of course, if you’re in the United States, then you should know that travel has become even more strict thanks in part to our President. But I’ve faced it all....
Continue reading...  

Review: Sigma 14-24mm f2.8 Art DG (Canon EF, Tested on Sony FE)

When the Sigma 14-24mm f2.8 Art DG came in for review, I saw the review going something like this “It’s great. Get it.” Now that’s not me being biased, but Sigma’s Art lineup of lenses have consistently been stellar and there isn’t a whole lot of argument about that. With the Sigma 14-24mm f2.8 Art DG you’re getting the same great Sigma optics that you always get in addition to weather resistance. The fact that they took the route of tackling a 14-24mm f2.8 optic instead of a 16-35mm also means that you’ve got even more range of coverage when you use their lenses. Of course, not every photographer will really need something like this as this range is typically used by architecture, environmental, landscape, and photojournalistic photographers. Not many folks need to go beyond 24mm and many even think it to be too wide. ...
Continue reading...  

Review: Sigma 500mm f4 DG OS HSM Sports (Canon EF Mount, Adapted to Sony FE)

I rarely ever review lenses are big as the Sigma 500mm f4 DG OS HSM Sports, but I fully admit that they’re an important part of the sports and wildlife photography world. And surprisingly, the Sigma 500mm f4 DG OS HSM can be handheld and shot if you’ve got the right settings. As a prime, fixed focal length lens that doesn’t have as fast of an aperture as many of the others out there, photographers who shoot outdoors are still bound to value it for its relatively compact size for a lens of this type and its fairly lightweight nature. You’ll also be glad to know that this lens has a dust-proof and splash-proof design. So if you’re like me, then you’ll want to adapt it to a Metabones adapter that has weather sealing built into it and mount it onto a camera like the Sony a7r III....
Continue reading...  

135mm Portrait Lenses Compared: Which One is Best for You?

The 135mm lens has started to grow more in popularity as a portrait lens option for photographers. This is due to its powerful compression abilities and its ability to make simply every look stunning. Indeed, modern 135mm lenses make portrait photography look easy in so many ways. There aren’t as many on the market as one may think though. Part of this is because the 85mm is often touted as being more useful due to a 135mm lens needing a lot of room to really make it efficient. In this post, we’re going to explore a few great lens options and whether or not you really need a 135mm lens to begin with....
Continue reading...  

Why Fast Rangefinder Lenses Are Almost Useless for Most Photographers

For years I was one of those people who lusted after an f0.95 lens; indeed fast rangefinder lenses are very worth it for many people. But believe it or not, they can be significantly more difficult to work with at times. Rangefinders for example need to be able to focus a lens like that; . But in order for that to happen, the mechanism needs to be larger in order to achieve accuracy. It’s only since recent years that EVFs have come around that have been good enough to use to aid in focusing with these lenses....
Continue reading...  

The Yashica digiFilm Camera Gets Delay in Part Due to Optics Refinement

I’m sure that no one can forget about the great photography bait and switch of 2017: the Yashica digiFilm Camera. It teased something that analog film photographers drooled for and became really excited about. But when announced, it left analog photographers really angry and that digital photographers cackling with laughter. To add a bit more salt to the wound, news has come that the camera is getting a delay. While some may be willing to quickly blame this on a Chinese company and how so many cheap products just seem to fall apart, that isn’t really the case. In the company’s latest Kickstarter Update, quite the opposite is the case. The Yashica digiFilm Camera is getting even more refinement....
Continue reading...  

Kodak Kodachrome Returns In Both 35mm and 120 Emulsions

Kodak Kodachrome was one of the most legendary film emulsions ever made! Rejoice, photographers: those of us who never got to shoot Kodak Kodachrome seem to be getting a chance after all. Almost 10 years after the company announced the death of the beloved film emulsion, Kodak is letting the world know that Kodachrome is indeed...
Continue reading...  

From Kodak to iPhoneography – The Evolution of Photography in One Infographic

The history of photography is a pretty complicated thing. But this really cool infographic from the London School of Photography will give you quite a bit of awesome reading time. It includes some of photography’s earliest beginnings and goes to Kodak, digital photography, and mobile photography. The information is displayed in such a way that it makes going from top to bottom really simple to digest....
Continue reading...  

The Meyer-Optik-Görlitz Nocturnus III 50 f0.95 Promises Gorgeous Bokeh

It’s been a little while since we’ve heard anything from Meyer-Optik, but now we’ve got something brand new: the Meyer-Optik-Görlitz Nocturnus III 50 f0.95. This new lens is promising to have some of the most gorgeous bokeh with its 15 aperture blades–that’s much more than many modern lens options. The lens, like many of the other options out there, is a manual focus and all metal build lens designed to come in either silver or black. Even more interestingly, the lens starts out at f0.95 and stops all the way down to only f11. Weird, right? Well, not really....
Continue reading...  

Review: VEO2 235CB Tripod (a Great Tripod for the Traveller)

When it comes to tripods, there isn’t really a whole lot of innovation that’s been happening in the past few years. Sure, the designs change and get better but there is nothing that is completely game changing. The Vanguard VEO 2 235CB is in some ways, the same thing that we’ve been seeing over the years but you instead have the supreme build quality that we’ve always experienced with Vanguard products. We field tested this while hiking, on airplanes, on the NYC subways, in cars, and on rugged waterfronts. Somehow or another, Vanguard was able to take the build quality that we expect with the Alta series and put it into a small enough package with the VEO. Granted, you’re not getting all the features and are really limited to a few heads, but if you’re shooting photos then the Vanguard VEO 2 235CB is pretty difficult to beat. ...
Continue reading...  

Useful Photography Tip #183: Vinegar Can Kill Some Forms of Lens Fungus

While this tip may not be the most important for photographers who own newer lenses, it’s very important for photographers who may acquire vintage or used glass. Something that can be quite annoying is fungus. In most cases, lens fungus doesn’t affect the image quality of a photo unless it’s severe. It also depends on the type of fungus and how much there is. The severity will also determine how you go about dealing with it. ...
Continue reading...  

Vintage Camera Review: Leica M4-P (Leica M Mount)

If you ever happen to stumble on a deal like I did with the Leica M4-P, then snag it as soon as you possibly can. In many ways, the Leica M4-P is one of the most perfect all analog cameras. While the Leica M6 goes a step further and incorporates the inclusion of a working light meter while allowing the camera to operate completely and totally mechanically at all shutter speeds, the Leica M4-P is essentially the Leica M6 without a light meter. And if you’re like me, you don’t always need a light meter because you’ve shot so often that you know and understand how Sunny 16 works or you’ve got an app on your phone that will help you figure that out with ease....
Continue reading...  

SEO for Photographers: An Introductory Guide to Getting Your Site Seen

The point is, if you want to rank highly in search results, you need to use search engine optimization techniques, or SEO, in order to tailor your site the way search engines like them. Here are five straightforward (i.e., not for computer programmers) tips photographers can use to optimize their websites....
Continue reading...  

Quick Review: ProGrade Digital SDXC UHS-II Class U3 Card

We’re not typically ones to review SD cards, but the recent ProGrade Digital SDXC UHS-II I feel deserves a bit of a feature due to addressing a concern that I had while testing the Fujifilm X-H1 recently. For photographers, using the card isn’t really a problem in and of itself. In fact, it’s a card that’s more or less flawless for photography. But the Fujifilm X-H1 is Fujifilm’s most aggressive push towards getting into the world of video. It sports a 4K, 24p, 200MB/second video feature. Luckily, the ProGrade Digital SDXC UHS-II writes at 200MB/second. So when tucked into the Fujifilm X-H1, it seemed to be a match made in heaven....
Continue reading...  

Book Review: Where I Find Myself by Joel Meyerowitz

Where I Find Myself by Joel Meyerowitz was sent in for review to me awhile ago, and I’ve put off writing about it until I’ve found the time to truly sit down and take the work in. It’s Joel afterall, and his work deserves some serious contemplation and thought. The thick book contains a lot of Meyerowitz’s life’s work and is designed to be a beautiful coffee table book for everyone that is a fan of the photographer. While Where I Find Myself by Joel Meyerowitz has a whole lot of good, there is also a whole lot of bad–or more importantly, a lot of injustice that I feel is done to the great photographer’s work....
Continue reading...  

Review: Fujifilm X-H1 (The Perfect Fuji with a Big Problem)

When the rumors of the Fujifilm X-H1 were circulating, it seemed as if all were good at least on paper. The Fujifilm X-H1 is being billed as the flagship X series cameras and addresses a number of concerns that photographers and users have had for awhile now. It adds to it 4K video at a number of frame rates and with high quality options including F log and 200MB/second. Then there have been enhancements to the autofocus, weather sealing enhancements, and some ergonomics changes to make the camera more like a DSLR without a mirror and pentaprism. At the heart, it’s using the same 24MP APS-C sensor that many of the other cameras use. And in truth, the Fujifilm X-H1 is a really excellent camera. But at the same time, this is hands down the camera with the worst ergonomics I’ve ever felt from Fujifilm....
Continue reading...  

Field Test: Shooting Video with the Fujifilm X-H1

During my testing of the Fujifilm X-H1, I was pretty confused. I had to think really carefully about who was going to buy this camera. At almost $2,000 and with some of the most unconventional ergonomics for a Fujifilm camera, it took a lot of thought. I can’t necessarily seeing folks buying this camera just to shoot street photography; but I’d see them buying it for more professional reasons like portraiture, documentary work, landscapes, weddings and of course the very big one–video. While most readers of this site don’t care about video all that much, it made sense to test it with the Fujifilm X-H1....
Continue reading...  

How Good is the Fujifilm X-H1’s In-Body Image Stabilization?

We’ve been testing the new Fujifilm X-H1 mirrorless camera for a few weeks now, and we’re overall very positive about the camera, though there are things about it are making me scratch my head. One of those things, in body image stabilization (IBIS) isn’t confusing me at all though. In fact, Fujifilm cameras have needed this feature for awhile now and the Fujifilm X-H1 is the first one to offer it up to consumers. The company is billing the Fujifilm X-H1 as their ultimate flagship offering for the X series and is about on par with pricing of the Nikon D500. At that price point, you’re getting not only in body stabilization, but the Fujifilm Eterna film simulation for a cinematic look, fast frame rates, weather sealing, enhanced autofocus, 4K 24p video at 200MB/second with F Log, and a top LCD screen for adjusting your settings....
Continue reading...  

Dear Sony: Please Fix Focus Peaking on Your Full Frame Cameras

For years now, I’ve been saying the same thing over and over again about Sony’s a7 and a9 cameras when it comes to manual focus optics. While the majority of users may be working with autofocus lenses, part of the reason for this could be the fact that when working with manual focus lenses, the experience can be pretty bad. What are we talking about?  This is specifically in reference to their full frame cameras and a problem that has persisted for years. Their APS-C cameras have some of the best focus peaking available but it seems like the algorithm was simply ported to the full frame cameras without any sort of update. For the record, it’s been brought to my attention that I really have been asking for this and saying it for years now....
Continue reading...  

Camera Bag Review: Tenba DNA 15 Backpack

For the past few months, one bag has really dominated my use: the Tenba DNA 15 backpack. The Tenba DNA messenger line was designed for commuters in large cities and was billed as being stylish–though quite honestly it’s nowhere as eye catching as their Cooper series. The Tenba DNA 15 backpack follows the same ideology but brings the idea to a backpack. They’re nice; but more so in a functional way that gives a photographer all that they need while not being super ugly, breaking the bank, or making you look like you subscribe to the bro culture deeply rooted in everything that Peak Design ever manufactured. Instead, the Tenba DNA backpack is a beast all in its own incorporating a roll-top style design, pockets on the side, pockets within pockets, and a really nice way to access your gear....
Continue reading...  

Film Emulsion Review: Kodak Portra 800 (120)

I cut my teeth in the photography world amongst some really old school people–these were the folks who probably would have never used Kodak Portra 800. Why? Well, they swore by the fact that everything that is over ISO 400 is way too grainy. And that grain is bad no matter what. This is wrong; and I only wish back then that I hadn’t let folks like that try it mislead my mind and that I was much more experimental. Kodak Portra 800 is a gorgeous film that is obviously still around for great reasons. It’s a film that is primarily designed for portraiture in available lighting. With that said, it’s beautiful in 35mm but even more so in 120 with fast lenses. And considering that so many photographers out there love to work with natural light more so than working with a flash, it could be one of the films that stays in your film camera on a consistent basis....
Continue reading...  

Emulsion: Our Analog Photography Zine is Now Available for Individual Purchase

We took to Kickstarter to fund Emulsion; a project that I wanted to bill as rounding up the best modern analog film photographers the world didn’t necessarily know about. Recently, backers of the project started to receive their copies of Emulsion and they’re singing nothing but praise for it. Today, we’re making Emulsion available for individual purchase on Blurb. This high end product will serve not only as a wonderful zine, but also as a fantastic coffee table book....
Continue reading...  

The Oberwerth Charlie is Both a Camera Bag and an Insert; Don’t Ask Us Why…

I’m not exactly sure that I totally understand the problem that the Oberwerth Charlie is trying to solve, but it also seems to be catering to the super OCD folks among us. The Oberwerth Charlie is designed for the photographer who, well, honestly according to the press release it doesn’t make sense. They’re billing the Oberwerth Charlie as a camera bag that is messenger style and can by slung around your shoulder whenever you need. Plus it has some gorgeous cowhide leather. But then they’re saying that when you want to use a larger bag, you simply just take out the insert from this bag and put it into the larger one....
Continue reading...  

20+ Things You Can Do Besides Trolling Other Photographers (Like Go Be Creative)

Photography has trolls and they’re awful. They really are; when you go into any sort of forum or look at images online, there is bound to be someone that speaks in a pedantic way about how terrible other photographers really are. In some cases, you’ll even see this in real life as you go into events and groups. Others are just judgemental; and when it comes to a contest or anything else like that, then that’s fine within reason and with a professional critique. But Trolling is far worse; it’s just a means to spew negativity into the world to get a quick thill and because your life is useless and meaningless. ...
Continue reading...  

Unpopular Opinion: The Best New Camera Under $300 is Probably Your Phone

For those of us who know better, it’s obvious to many of us that you need to spend over $1000 to get a solid camera with lenses and all. You can get a previous generation’s camera for cheaper, but if you’re a hobbyist you’re also bound to want to newest and greatest thing. So every now and again I’ll get pinged by people for this. On a daily basis, our email gets sent questions about cameras and such. But for people that don’t know any better and have less money around, they’ll ask a question like “Hey, I’m looking for a camera that takes professional photos for under $300. What’s on the market?” And more often than not, the consistent answer has become the same thing: your phone....
Continue reading...  

I’m Not Really a Photographer: I’m Actually an IT Guy.

“I leave Tuesday for my first Caribbean project of the season.” is what my friend Cory Silken tells me as the motivation for this article. “I’ve literally been preparing new kit since October.” And for the most part, he’s right. You probably wouldn’t necessarily care or agree as much if you’re a hobbyist photographer; but if you’re a seasoned professional then you’ll completely understand where we’re coming from here. Every time that you go into a seriously large gig of some sort, there’s a big equipment check. You’ll see that your batteries are in perfectly and fully charged, you have extra memory cards, your flashes are in working order, your camera sensor is spotless and a variety of other mishaps that are bound to be problematic. But most of all, you’ll need to ensure that you have the latest firmware update on your camera, lenses, flashes, devices, etc....
Continue reading...  

Sony’s Oddly Very Expensive Lens is a Remnant from the NEX Days

The saying goes that cameras deteriorate in value but lenses really hold onto it; and in the case of Sony that’s a very true statement. Almost 10 years ago, Sony introduced their NEX 5 and NEX 3 cameras–these two cameras would be the precursor to the wildly successful mirrorless camera system that they have today. The NEX system was E mount and years later, they would simply just incorporate it into the Alpha series to give it a bit more history along the lines of Minolta. They launched with a pancake lens that was mediocre at best though fun to work with. And a bit later on came their first very serious optic: the Sony Zeiss 24mm f1.8. If you’ve been a photographer for a while (and according to our reader survey, many of you have been for well over five years) then you know about how important this lens was. ...
Continue reading...  

Review: Venus Optics Laowa 9mm f2.8 Compact Dreamer (Sony E Mount)

If you attach the new Venus Optics Laowa 9mm f2.8 Compact Dreamer to a Sony a6500 camera, then you’ll see that while it’s a weird lens it’s a lens that Sony really needs for their system besides a fisheye. It’s billed as a lens with really low distortion–and it indeed doesn’t have a whole lot of it except around the corners. Designed for APS-C sensors, I also feel like this lens isn’t necessarily a big winner for Venus Optics. Many of their lenses have this beautiful character to them. But this one feels flat in many ways–and that means that you’re going to surely rely more on what the sensor is capable of doing. That’s fine, but I’ve never been so lukewarm about a lens from Venus Optics....
Continue reading...  

Chris Schmid’s Photographs of Musk Ox in the Cold Are Hypnotic

Photographer Chris Schmid can do absolutely no wrong when it comes to visuals. The Sony Artisan’s latest masterpiece highlights the tales of the Musk Ox–which is probably one of the less spoken about type of oxen out there. Schmid went to Dovrefjell-Sunndalsfjella National Park and braved 100km/hr winds on top of freezing temperatures to be able to photograph these mammoth beasts. To do this project, he used the Sony a7r III and the Sony a9....
Continue reading...  

First Impressions: Hasselblad H6D-400C Multi-Shot (Medium Format)

I’m starting the first impressions post on the Hasselblad H6D-400C Multi-Shot with an extremely obvious statement above and with an emphasis on the fact that complaining about something like this is truthfully useless. There’s bound to be someone that’s going to say “That’s so expensive.” Well, you’re surely not the customer that the Hasselblad H6D-400C Multi-Shot is pointed at. I mean, do you own a museum? Do you have need to documenting something at a larger than life detail? Do you need a fantastic tethered workflow? Do you even have a tripod designed to hold such a beast? The honest answer for most of us pedestrians is no–we’re not that high up in the food chain of photography. But the MET and other museums like the Smithsonian or the US government surely have a need for a camera like this. To refresh your mind, the Hasselblad H6D-400C Multi-Shot is a 100MP medium format camera back unit. For those that don’t understand, traditional medium format consisted of a camera body, a camera back with the sensor and brains, and the lens. So you’re essentially shelling out a whole lot of money for a sensor and brains....
Continue reading...