Chris Gampat Chris Gampat

All articles by Chris Gampat

 

Op-Ed: Why Don’t We Have Cameras with Lower ISO Settings?

One of the easy answers to this question is because it isn’t sexy and marketers don’t know how to market it. High ISOs, details, and measurbations are all sexy–and since they’re done in a lab everyone can talk about them and adore them. Then folks who have little else to do can sit there and argue about their results on forums, in Facebook groups, etc. But it’s an organic and real question that I’ve had in my mind for a very long time: Why don’t we have cameras with lower ISO settings?...
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The Fujifilm XF10 Doesn’t Replace the X70; Has a Square Mode

There have been reports on a new Fujifilm point and shoot camera circling the web for some time now; and those regarding the new Fujifilm XF10 seem to be true. The new Fujifilm is a brand new point and shoot camera targeted at the lower end and the enthusiast. It doesn’t have an X Trans sensor, instead it’s just a plain old 24.2MP APS-C sensor along with a 3 inch touch screen. And instead of adding new film simulation modes, they’re adding more advanced filters–perfect marketing for the folks who may be reaching for this camera. On top of all that, Fujifilm is only charging $499.95 for the Fujifilm XF10....
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Film Emulsion Review: Fujifilm Velvia 100 (35mm and 120)

Here’s one of those stories and moments that I’ve said all too many times when it comes to film and film photography; over and over again I was told that Fujifilm Velvia 100 isn’t worth the money or the hassle. But instead, Velvia 50 was where it was at and there was no exception to that rule. In my re-education of film photography, I found many of the things that photographers said over the years to be simply untrue. Kodak Tri-X isn’t the end all and be all of film photography. Velvia 50 isn’t the end all and be all of landscape photography either. But instead, Fujifilm Velvia 100 is a really, really solid film. It’s gorgeous in so many ways but like all film emulsions, it shines the larger you go....
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Rant: Shooting Pretty Women from Behind on the Streets Is Not Street Photography

I once was told by a man who was as enamoured with street photography as I am that he admired a photo of a long woman in a park looking away at something. “I wonder what she’s looking at.” he said. “She’s sort of really fixated on something.” Whatever she may have been fixated on, a part of my mind sat there wondering what the hell he was talking about. In the most abstract sense of the image, is was nothing more than just a woman staring off at something, perhaps watching her kid/pet run around, waiting for someone to catch up, or just standing there. It was the mind that went somewhere else and as far as how the image was shot, it didn’t seem like the photographer really cared so much about her expression as he did just the fact that there might have been a slight sense of attraction....
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Inside the Photographer’s Mind: Kien Quan

We had our first dance photographer recently on Inside the Photographer’s Mind as Kien Quan graced us with his presence. Kien started out as a dancer and then decided that he wanted to get into photography. As Kien explains, he always goes about stuff the hard way. So he got a camera, lights, looked up tutorials, and then got into capturing his friends in his dance crew. From there, he networked with other dancers and did the same thing....
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Tutorial: The Differences Between a Parabolic Umbrella and a Beauty Dish

When it comes to portrait photography there is no doubt in my mind that softboxes are the most popular diffusers, but parabolic umbrellas and beauty dishes are also a favorite of many photographers. If you’re just getting into lighting, then it can be confusing as I’m positive that anyone can look at an image and not know whether or not a softbox, umbrella, or beauty dish was used to shoot it. Anita Sedowska takes you through it in her latest tutorial video which you’ll find after the jump, but we thought that we’d go into our archives to dig even deeper....
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The Kwilt Shoebox Plus Basically Turns Any Hard Drive Into a Personal Photo Server

Photographers who travel a whole lot sometimes need to access their RAW files while they’re on the road. And if they’re not accessible on a cloud server, then you may want to look at the new Kwilt Shoebox Plus. Claiming to be completely platform agnostic, the Kwilt Shoebox Plus connects to your hard drive, flash drive, etc and then connects to the web using a 5 GHz wireless-AC network or via a direct ethernet connection to your router. The better part: it can sync images from all your social platforms too....
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Film Emulsion Review: Ilford FP4 Plus 125 (35mm and 120)

Since learning about what it could do years ago, I’ve always had an affinity for Ilford FP4 Plus 125, but also understood that it isn’t a jack of all trades type of film. Instead, Ilford FP4 125 is what I’d like to call a film that you’d try to shoot high contrast with, but with the knowledge that the shadows are going to be opened up no matter what. In fact, that’s really what this film is all about. You’re often encouraged to underexpose it to get more from the highlights and have the shadows be taken care of in the processing. Available in both 35mm and 120 film stocks, Ilford FP4 125 can be really beautiful in the right hands. While I may instead reach for CineStill bwXX for portraits, I’ve found Ilford FP4 Plus 125 to be best for things like both street and abstract architecture photos....
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Amazon Prime Day: The Camera and Lens Deals You Need to Know About

Here’s everything we were able to find for Amazon prime day. We’re working on round up even more. Fujifilm X-T2 (Read our review): $1,099  Deals on Photo prints Amazon’s Camera deals for Prime Day DSLRs Canon deals Sony deals Olympus deals Nikon deals Fujifilm Deals Camera for college...
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The Gitzo Traveler Alpha Tripod Wants to Get to Know Your Sony Camera

Gitzo and the rest of the Vitec group have been keen on doing collaborations with companies like Sony; and the star of their latest is the new Gitzo Traveler Alpha. So how is it specifically designed for Sony cameras? Apparently, it has to do with the tripod plate. Said plate for the Gitzo Traveler Alpha connects to the tripod socket of the Sony a7 and a9 (which they’re touting in the press release but we’re sure it will work with others it seems). In addition to this, there is a new Gitzo L-Bracket Alpha. This accessory is intended to make switching from vertical to horizontal positions even smoother....
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TONIGHT! Kien Quan Talks With Us Live About His Dance Photography

Tune in tonight: Get into the mind of how dance photographer Kien Quan creates his images Based in New York City, Kien Quan is a commercial/lifestyle photographer specializing in capturing dance and movement. With over 10 years of experience in dance, he seeks to “elevate the imagery of the art form through visual storytelling.” We...
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Useful Photography Tip #185: Why You Should Generally Underexpose Your Images

One of the biggest and best tips that I could possibly give any photographer about modern digital photography has to do with metering a scene. First off, if you’re using a form of evaluative metering then you should often use the light meter as a gauge and not try to always get the little blinker in the middle of the exposure indicator. You personally may want an image to be brighter, so learn how your camera handles more overexposed photos....
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Troll Post: Aperture Priority Should Also Be Known as Amateur Priority

For a number of years, I’ve shot a whole lot in aperture priority on my cameras. It’s simple; it means that I can just sit there and shoot while just controlling the depth of field and let the camera figure everything else out on its own. This translates to my love of glorious bokeh and the algorithms are so good that every camera can do it and take identical images that folks can then say theirs is better or someone else’s is worse. It’s essential for those days that you want to dress up a bit nicer and pretend that you’re a modern Bresson because of course that’s all that he would use today. He’d just say “F8 and be there!” which would mean less bokeh and more of the scene itself. ...
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NVIDIA, Aalto University, and MIT’s AI Can Now Fix Your Grainy Images

I think that lots of photographers wouldn’t mind software that could fix the image noise in their photos and also bring back more details automatically. But arguably they’d probably want to do it themselves and fine tune it to their exact needs and wants. After all, a little bit of image grain in a photo can add character to the scene. In a recent announcement from NVIDIA, the company teamed up with Aalto University and MIT to create algorithms that are designed to fix the grain in your images....
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The New Nikon P1000 Has a 125x Optical Zoom with a Laughable 1/2.3 inch Sensor for $999.95

Today, for some odd reason, the Nikon P1000 point and shoot camera is being announced. Odd, you ask? The fact that it is a point and shoot isn’t such a big issue at all; but the fact that it’s a superzoom camera being marketed as one with a 125x optical zoom is what’s insane. Kudos to Nikon for being able to do something like this; but then you read the fine print (or in this case, print that’s not even in the press release) and see the bait and switch–this Nikkor lens is having its potential wasted by being placed in front of a 1/2.3 inch sensor....
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Opinion: Please Stop Wearing a Photo Vest if You Don’t Need to Be Wearing a Photo Vest

When I got into this industry years ago, one thing really confused me almost as much as how much certain older photographers tend to treat the younger generation of us: photo vests. I’m completely positive that you’ve all seen them: a photographer of a certain distinguishment (or trying to show off without having said distinguishment) wearing their vests that look a lot like safari vests. You know, almost as if they’re going to go out on an African safari at all times without being anywhere near something like a safari. Walking down the streets doing street photography? You’ll see a photo vest. In the studio? Photo vest! Hiking? Yup, A Photo vest!...
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Capture One Latitude Style Packs Are Designed to Give Inspiration

One of the coolest things about Capture One is that they frequently offer up their own styles packs, and the new Capture One Latitude style packs are the latest option. Styles, which work almost like presets in Lightroom, utilize the arguably superior RAW processing algorithms that Capture One is capable of delivering. The two packs are the Sunbound and Deep Forest packs....
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Dear Friends, I Do Not Want to Be Your Wedding Photographer

There are no words of congratulations strong enough nor effective enough to show my excitement for what is about to come for you. You and your fiancé found a way to persevere through the world of modern dating and found each other in genuine love. For years, you will be the envy of me and many others....
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Get into the Mind of Dance Photographer Kien Quan

Next week: Get into the mind of how dance photographer Kien Quan creates his images Based in New York City, Kien Quan is a commercial/lifestyle photographer specializing in capturing dance and movement. With over 10 years of experience in dance, he seeks to “elevate the imagery of the art form through visual storytelling.” We featured...
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Review: Panasonic 12-60mm F2.8-4 Power OIS (Micro Four Thirds)

When the Panasonic 12-60mm f2.8-4 Power OIS was announced with a number of other variable aperture lenses out there, I was very confused. Why would Panasonic make a lineup of lenses with a variable aperture and target them at professional photographers? Many want constant aperture lenses. Granted, these are a bit longer than most professional zoom lenses and as I saw over a while, the performance is also really up there. The Panasonic 12-60mm f2.8-4 Power OIS is weather sealed, sharp, fast to focus, provides quite a bit of extra (and much needed) stabilization, and just feels great in the hand. When it comes to working with Micro Four Thirds, it also means that you generally never need to stop the lenses down due to depth of field....
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Review: Olympus EPL9 (Or, Why and How I Fell Back in Love with Olympus)

The Olympus EPL9 isn’t a camera that should be taken seriously, yet it should inspire you in a different way When the Olympus EPL9 was announced, I jokingly said to myself that I’d do the entire review taking nothing else but selfies to mock my generation and because much of our initial briefing on the...
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Dance Photographer Kien Quan Is Our Next Guest on Inside the Photographer’s Mind

Based in New York City, Kien Quan is a commercial/lifestyle photographer who specializes in capturing dance and movement. With over 10 years of experience in dance, he seeks to “elevate the imagery of the art form through visual storytelling.” We’ve featured Kien a few years back as he experimented with dance photography and smoke bombs. So on July 11th at 5pm EST, The Phoblographer’s Chris Gampat and photographer Kien Quan will sit down at the Adorama Event Space to a studio audience for a live Facebook broadcast. Please join us! You can sign up via Eventbrite right here!...
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James Lattanzio’s Black and White Landscapes Work in Layers

Photographer James Lattanzio is a photographer based here in NYC, and he grew up with a love of the outdoors via weekend getaways to upstate. As things would have it, he eventually discovered Ansel Adams and the rest is quite simple to fill in the blanks. For James, he’s all about consistency–so he approached landscapes, portraits and architecture all in the same way. This is something that I haven’t seen in many photographers in addition to the way that James works specifically in layers. So after seeing his work at a recent APA NY show, I needed to get in touch....
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Review: Panasonic GH5s (One of My Favorite Micro Four Thirds Cameras)

When the Panasonic GH5s was first announced, I wasn’t very sure what to think of it. Sure, Panasonic was going after the video market and the high ISO market in the same way that Sony was. But for years, I wasn’t always too keen about Panasonic’s cameras. Over the past few years though, I’ve grown more of a soft spot for them as their performance has dramatically improved in a number of areas. With the Panasonic GH5s the name of the game is high ISO output. It has a 10.2MP Four Thirds sensor at the heart, weather sealing, dual card slots, touch screen, headphone jacks, microphone jacks, PC sync port, hot shoe, and dials galore that many photographers will love and appreciate. Yet for years still, folks continue to discount Micro Four Thirds and what’s possible....
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Review: Canon EOS M50 (Canon EF-M) (Not Bad, But Not Fantastic)

The Canon M50 has to be one of Canon’s best mirrorless camera options yet; but at the moment of writing this review, it still feels like Canon is intentionally holding themselves back for reasons that I genuinely don’t understand. Canon’s sensors are arguably also not as fantastic as those offered by their competitors. However, mirrorless camera sales are starting to outdo DSLRs. So Canon can only hold back for so long. If I were to equate this to anything in their lineup, it would be something akin to a high end Rebel camera. Canon put features in that reviewers have been asking for for a long time now such as 4K video, silent shutter, etc. The camera on its own is pretty darned good. But when you put it next to the competition, it quickly starts to crumble....
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The Intrepid 4×5 Mk 3 Large Format Camera Gets a Minor Update

A few years ago, the Intrepid 4×5 camera went to Kickstarter to get crowd funded. Now, the camera is in its third version and the company is still preaching the idea of high quality at a fraction of the price of other cameras. According to the press release, the new Intrepid Mk3 “…sees the addition of leaf springs to securely hold the ground glass/film holders, rear standard tilt and swing and a much larger baseplate for use with all tripod mounts (1/4 and 3/8).” Though that sounds minor, it adds a whole lot more in terms of the durability and lifespan of the camera. Of course you still need to use your own lenses, tripods, etc. But you’re getting the body frame, the ground glass, the bellows, etc. More tech specs are after the jump....
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Useful Photography Tip #184: How to Find the ISO Button of Most Cameras in the Dark

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Click here. You’re in a bind; you’re in a dark place and you’re trying to find the ISO button on your camera. What do you do? Some folks end up pressing buttons until they get to exactly what they want. But if you’ve got a camera with a dedicated ISO button,...
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Review: Tamron 70-210mm f4 Di VC USD (Canon EF)

When testing the Tamron 70-210mm f4 Di VC USD, I had a whole lot of hope. The company’s lenses have been stellar and they’ve been winning many awards. But when it came to working with this lens, things were just off. The quality of the optics is fantastic as always. But where I saw issues was with performance–not only on the Canon 6D Mk II but with a Sony a7r III and a Metabones adapter. It could do the job, but with varying success that other lenses of similar types and focal lengths could do. With that said though, the Tamron 70-210mm f4 Di VC USD isn’t at all a bad lens–it’s just one that I’d probably relegate just to studio work and sports with lots of bright light....
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Opinion: What I’d Love to See in a Full Frame Ricoh GR Camera Body

There is a hope amongst many photographers out there: that one day a full frame Ricoh GR camera body might actually make it out into the world. It’s the dream of many a photographer, especially those in the street photography community. But otherwise, it would also just be nice for those who travel and want a compact camera with solid image quality to tote around. This lust comes partially from just how good their film point and shoot cameras still are even today. They still sell for a lot of money online and even though their last Ricoh GR II was a solid camera, it’s time to upgrade to something even better....
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The Lomography Diana Instant Square Camera is Their Most Perplexing Camera Yet

Today, Lomography is lifting the veil in something that they should have done a long time ago (sort of) with the Lomography Diana Instant Square Camera. In my mind, it makes sense; but the implementation also is just a tad perplexing. The Lomography Diana Instant Square Camera of course incorporates the use of square film and gives you aperture control and focusing control over the lens with the Diana camera’s 1/60th shutter speed. Mixed with the ISO 800 film, that’s generally all that you need in some situations. However, this negates Lomo’s claim of it being fully manual–it isn’t. But I really wonder why Lomo just didn’t stick with Mini in this case....
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Thanks for Preset Syncing, Adobe. It Took You Long Enough…

There are two different camps and trains of thought when it comes to presets with Adobe Lightroom. Some photographers scoff at them, instead stating that they’re going to use their own knowledge to get to the solution and not going to make it easy. More often than not, those photographers fail pretty hard. It’s a stubbornness if not a very specific creative vision that these photographers have for themselves. But those who embrace presets either genuinely like the look, are wannabe film photographers, or use them to satisfy clients. And for that reason and for those photographers, preset syncing is huge....
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Review: Tamron 28-75mm f2.8 Di III RXD (Sony FE)

Generally speaking, I’m not one that likes zoom lenses; but when I considered what the Tamron 28-75mm f2.8 Di III RXD is then I didn’t mind it all that much. The talks about autofocus issues are in my opinion highly over exaggerated as I personally didn’t see them with my unit. In fact, I didn’t suffer from any real autofocus issues at all. To that end, the Tamron 28-75mm f2.8 Di III RXD focused better on the Sony a7r III than their lenses have focused on Canon DSLRs in my years of testing Tamron’s newest lenses. These lenses have been emphasizing new philosophy within Tamron that gives each unit a silver ring around the mount, weather sealing, a new finish, and a number of major enhancements. While the world talks of Sigma this and Sigma that, I often like to remind folks that Tamron also isn’t doing a bad job....
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A Quick Visual Reference of How Much Light a Full Frame Sensor Absorbs Vs an APS-C Sensor

While testing out the Rokinon 50mm f1.4 AF for the Sony a7r III and the Fujifilm X-H1, I was shooting with f1.4 lenses on both cameras. When exposing scenes at ISO 6400 and shooting wide open at f1.4 with similar metering, I came across something that I found was pretty crazy. To verify it, I showed it to a buddy of mine who works for a pretty famous camera store. When he saw it himself, he was pretty shocked. I knew for years that full frame sensors tend to absorb more light per pixel and have better color overall–but I’ve never had a visual difference otherwise until recently....
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Cameras and Lenses Don’t Take Bad Photos; People Take Bad Photos

The statement I often like to make is that in this economy, no product developer is going to their managers and purposely trying to pitch ideas that they think will fail and that won’t bring their company any profits. That just doesn’t happen anymore, and overall companies are all making very good products. It’s impossible to take bad pictures with them unless you know nothing about taking pictures. And even then, many of these products have an automatic mode that makes it really straightforward. Instead, some companies just aren’t choosing to innovate and keep up with others; and I think that we all know whom we’re talking about here....
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Coming Soon: The Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 500mm f5.6E PF ED VR

So if all the stars align just right, I think that one of the big announcements that we’re going to see this year from Nikon will be the new Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 500mm f5.6E PF ED VR that they’re announcing the development of today. This lens is designed to be a “lightweight” 500mm prime lens for photographers who want something like that for their big, heavy, clunky DSLR camera. This announcement is only that of the fact that the lens is being developed. Why? If I really had to guess, it’s to tease photographers to let them know that something big is coming from them later on this year. And it’s a whole lot better than what Kodak has been doing with teasing us about the existence of Ektachrome recently....
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Review: 7Artisans 35mm f2 (Leica M Mount, Used on Sony FE)

Let me get this right out of the way, the 7Artisans 35mm f2 lens isn’t as good as Leica’s. You’re getting better sharpness, detail, and bokeh in pretty much every way and at every aperture. But the 7Artisans 35mm f2 isn’t at all bad; and it can still render very gorgeous images. Being a Chinese lens, there are surely folks out there who may doubt how capable it is. But I can assure you that unless you had other lenses side by side or were very familiar with other optics, you wouldn’t really be able to tell the difference between the 7Artisans 35mm f2 and other offerings when it comes to image quality. But when it comes to the ergonomics, there are surely differences....
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My Wishlist: What I Want in the Fujifilm X Pro 3

I’ve never found it reasonable to constantly upgrade to the next generation of cameras that come out, and that’s why I’ve been holding out for the Fujifilm X Pro 3. I still own the Fujifilm X Pro 1, and to this day it is in my eyes one of the best cameras ever made in the past 10 years. The image quality still holds up as you can easily make the raw files look like film or have them be really high end. While Sony cameras are what I’d use for most of my work, Fujifilm is what I use for studio projects and for my hobby photography. I’ve always preferred the rangefinder style of cameras as they simply just conform better to my hands....
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Review: MiNT InstantKon RF70 (Fujifilm Instax Wide and Manual Controls)

I’ve been playing with the MiNT InstantKon RF70 for a while now purposely taking my time with it in order to ensure that I didn’t miss anything. This camera is, in my opinion, the most important Instant film camera to have been released in the past few years. It makes use of the less popular Instax Wide format, and it also allows the photographer to have full manual control over the image. The MiNT InstantKon RF70 has a lens with aperture controls and manual focusing utilizing a rangefinder. There is a light meter built in, and the camera is overall pretty lightweight and compact. There isn’t a whole lot to complain about thus far–except for the fact that there are a few things that really concern me....
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Inside the Photographer’s Mind: Jonathan Higbee

Jonathan Higbee was our latest guest on Inside the Photographer’s Mind, and he was able to keep a full audience of folks enthralled with his words and experiences on what it’s like to be a modern street photographer. Jonathan is a rare breed, he’s a street photographer who actually makes his living from it. He isn’t an influencer, he isn’t sponsored by any sort of companies and the moment of publishing this post: he makes print sales. In fact, it’s 90% of his income....
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The New Canon 70-200mm Lens Updates are Very Perplexing

Oh Canon, what are you doing? Today, the company is announcing that they’re making changes to both of their 70-200mm lenses. The more common changes amongst both are that they’re getting a newer white exterior to fully match the other telephoto L lenses in their lineup. In terms of consistency, that makes sense in their lineup. Then there are new coatings on their lenses. But otherwise when it comes to the Canon 70-200mm f2.8 L III IS USM, those are the big, major changes. The optics are the same as the previous lens. Why? Well, I guess Canon believes that the optics are good enough or they’re confident enough to say that it will be able to resolve the resolution of any sensors that they happen to be creating later on....
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KONO! Has Two New Black and White Film Emulsions for Analog Photographers

KONO! has always been a bit of a quirky company when it comes to their film emulsions; but they have to embrace this in order to actually stand out from the digital world that continues to try to emulate the look of film as much as it tries and fails. Today, they’re announcing two new film emulsions: KONO! Rekorder and KONO! Monolit 64. These are still in line with their quirkiness and identity as a company....
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TONIGHT! Tune in on Facebook Live to Our Chat With Jonathan Higbee

TONIGHT: Street photographer Jonathan Higbee is our next guest on Inside the Photographer’s Mind. Street photographer Jonathan Higbee is one of New York’s up and coming photographers who not only has an interesting approach to street photography but also has a very curious background in photography. He doesn’t only shoot street, he shoots surreal work and has...
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Film Scanner Review: Kodak Scanza

I’ve reviewed options like the Kodak Scanza before that I genuinely wish were higher in quality, but what you’re getting for the most part isn’t really all that awful. It takes your 35mm film and can deliver for you up to 22MP still image JPEG files. If you want TIFFs or DNG files, then you’ll need something significantly higher end that is bound to take up more real estate on your desk. But if you just want to scan your photos, it’s seriously tough to beat the Kodak Scanza. It works via a simple interface that takes your film, gives you an immediate preview with color corrections, and allows you to scan by simply pressing a button. These images are then put onto an SD card or onto your computer directly. This all sounds fantastic, except that the Kodak Scanza suffers from a few design issues that are holding back my highest recommendations....
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A Visual Guide to How 35mm, 50mm and 85mm Lenses Differ For Portrait Photography

Photographers who love taking portraits have most likely experimented with a variety of focal lengths; or they’re at least curious about what each does for the genre. Popular focal lengths include 85mm, but in the past few years 50mm and 35mm lenses have become better and better when it comes to portraiture. They have less distortion and overall just have a more pleasing look about them. Today, every manufacturer makes good lenses; and when it comes to portraiture the only thing to keep in mind is what sort of portrait you want to create....
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The Slower Lens on the Sony RX100 VI May Turn Bokeh Lovers Off

With the new announcement of the Sony RX100 VI camera, there comes with it a number of great technologies but also a number of tradeoffs. Before I go on, I should state that I’ve spent a few minutes with the new camera and that I get to play with it more later on. But right off the bat, I’ve got a number of theories....
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A Quick Look at Ilford Delta 3200 vs Kodak TMax P3200

In the analog film world, there are two big high ISO black and white films in existence: Ilford Delta 3200 and Kodak TMax P3200. They’re both much different films, but they’re also both black and white. It recently came to our attention that folks would love to see some sort of comparison of both. And so we decided to go through our archives of testing to bring you some of our thoughts....
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Psst…The Magnum Photos Square Print Sale is Back

There’s some good news folks, the Magnum Square Print Sale is back on for a limited amount of time. This sale happened not too long ago for a few days and Magnum has decided to do it again. Photographers from all across the Magnum Archives are being featured; but primarily the year 1968 is being showcased. It was a very big one with things like MLK being assassinated, the Vietnam war, and much more. Magnum’s press release is after the jump....
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These Fantastic Prime Portrait Lenses Aren’t 85mm; You’ll Love Them

Most photographers seem to reach for 85mm lenses when it comes to their choice amongst portrait lenses. But some photographers genuinely need something longer or shorter at times and also much prefer prime lenses to many others out there. 85mm lenses are absolutely fantastic, but sometimes one needs more versatility. There are moments where you can surely use something longer and other moments where you’d want something shorter. We dove into our reviews index to find some of our favorites....
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The Mint InstantKon RF70 All Manual Instax Camera Gets Official Details; Pre-Order in June

Perhaps one of the most anticipated cameras for many photographers could be the new Mint InstantKon RF70. I’ve personally wanted a camera that could shoot Fujifilm Instax Wide emulsions and give me full manual controls for many years. That’s here now; and I genuinely hope that it prompts both Lomography and Fujifilm to get with it. I’ve been personally playing with the Mint InstantKon RF70 for around tow weeks now and we’ve known about it for many months. Today, MiNT is releasing all the details....
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Review: Fujifilm Instax Square SQ6 (Fujifilm Instax Square)

With the Fujifilm Instax Square SQ6’s arrival on the scene, Fujifilm I feel has created a respectable Instax Square camera. When the SQ10 was released, I was very hesitant. I’m not a fan of a digital photo being printed onto an Instax frame from the camera. By and large, I prefer full pass through of light through the lens to the film plane. Somehow, Fujifilm was able to create it in a compact form factor that is also very stylish. In many ways, the Fujifilm Instax Square SQ6 is what the Instax Mini 90 is but with the Square format. ...
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