Film Review: SILBERSALZ35 (A Game Changer for Film Photographers)

SILBERSALZ35’s 35mm cine film makes authentic Kodak cinefilm for analog photographers looking to give their work a cinematic look.

We first learned about Silbersalz35 during 2018’s Photokina, and it was one of the most exciting developments we’ve seen in the analog photography space. While CineStill has made cinefilm accessible to stills shooters for some time, what Silbersalz35 is offering with their various cine film emulsions are fundamentally different. Although CineStill and Silbersalz emulsions are cut from the same Kodak Vision3 motion picture film stock, one fundamental difference separates the two. The Silbersalz35 emulsions are unmodified Kodak Vision3 film stock that retain the remjet layer and are cut down to 35mm, while CineStill has the remjet layer native to the Vision3 film stock removed in order to make it possible to develop the film using the popular C-41 process. Traditionally, Kodak Vision3 required the use of the expensive ECN2 development process that was not readily available to still photographers.

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Review: Ilford ORTHO Plus ISO 80 Black and White Film (35mm)

Ilford ORTHO Plus is a fine grain film that can get a whole lot of detail and treats reds/oranges like darks.

When Ilford ORTHO Plus launched last year, we were very curious about it. It’s a low grain, high detail film that needs a lot of light. But most interesting is its lack of sensitivity to reds and oranges. What this means is that the red leaves of trees during the autumn will come out looking dark. Red and orange sand will be very dark. Red cars and lipstick will be nearly pitch black. So when it comes to creativity, Ilford ORTHO Plus allows a photographer to have a more playful mind.

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Review: Leica M6 TTL (The Best Film Camera They Ever Made)

The Leica M6 TTL has everything that a photographer could possibly want in a Leica camera.

There was a time when I believed the Leica M4-P to be the best camera that Leica ever made–and in some ways I believe it to still be superior over the Leica M6 TTL. The Leica M6 TTL is just easier. But if you’re a photographer that is a true master of the Sunny 16 method, then the Leica M4-P could be all that you need. With the Leica M6 TTL the ability to shoot at events with a flash becomes much easier due to the TTL flash capabilities. And for that reason alone, most photographers will probably stick with the original Leica M6.

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Review: Fujifilm INSTAX Mini 11 (Get Excited for a Glass Lens)

The Fujifilm Instax Mini 11 is the successor to the company’s most affordable Instax camera, and it’s better in every single way.

There was a time where I wouldn’t be caught dead with the Fujifilm Instax Mini series of cameras, but the Fujifilm INSTAX Mini 11 is part of what’s winning me over fully through the line. Though the Fujifilm Instax Mini LiPlay is still my favorite camera in the lineup, the Fujifilm INSTAX Mini 11 isn’t at all far behind. This is the company’s most basic Instax camera. There is no digital component. There aren’t a lot of fancy switches and knobs. It just gets turned on and off and shoots Instax film. There’s a selfie mode on the lens for photos of your beautiful mug. But perhaps best of all is the glass lens that’s on the front. Instax has been doing this for a few models now and it’s great that it’s coming to the Fujifilm INSTAX Mini 11.

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Review: Ars Imago Lab Box (For the New Film Shooter)

The Ars Imago Lab Box is how the new film photographer can get into the analog world much easier.

When the Lab Box arrived in the mail, I’ll admit to being apprehensive about the contents of the anonymous mailing box. Having backed many Kickstarter projects over the years, I was well aware that the products can run the gamut from barely cobbled together homebrew items to well-polished products ready for any store’s shelves. Often you’re unlikely to know which you’ve backed until the product arrives months (or sometimes years) later. However, my initial wariness was thankfully unfounded. The packaging was not only polished and professional but had the air of a higher-end item.

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Review: Ars Imago 320 Black and White Film (Please Come Back)

With Ars Imago 320, a photographer can expect super sharp images with fine grain at a usable ISO.

Ten years ago, no one would have predicted there would be a market for Ars Imago 320. But in the past few years, we’ve see a revival of film photography unlike any other. Around the world, younger photographers are picking up film cameras in an effort to get something different. The tangible process film photography allots the modern shooter is much more about the interpersonal connection than what digital offers. And with Ars Imago 320, photographers are getting a whole lot of versatility. While they state it’s good enough to be pushed to ISO 800, this fine grain film is also incredibly sharp. It’s for moments when you don’t need ISO 400 but also need more than ISO 100. Best of all, it’s in black and white. Load it up in a camera like the Fujifilm Natura S and you’re bound to have a lot of fun. We sure did. And while it was a limited edition, we hope it will come back.

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Review: Fujifilm Instax Mini Link Smartphone Instax Printer

Fans of Instax Mini prints will appreciate the usability refinements Fujifilm incorporated into their new Instax Mini Link smartphone printer.

Fujifilm’s Instax line of instant cameras and mobile printers have been dominating the instant photography market. Today, they’re unveiling their brand new Instax Mini Link smartphone Instax printer. Instant cameras have seen a massive resurgence in popularity in recent years thanks to their ability to capture moments instantly and spontaneously. One thing that sometimes leaves people wanting more with instant cameras is that most of them tend to have plastic lenses. Plastic lenses result in less than stellar image quality. With most smartphones capable of capturing photos with excellent images quality these days, smartphone printers give you the best of both worlds. We had a chance to test out the Fujifilm Instax Mini Link before it’s official launch. Head on after the jump to see whether or not it’s worth the upgrade. Continue reading…

Review: Fujifilm Instax Mini LiPlay (My New Favorite Instax Camera)

I was pleasantly surprised by the Fujifilm Instax Mini LiPlay; it’s much better than the company’s first foray into a fusion camera.

When I first heard the rumors of the Fujifilm Instax Mini LiPlay, I admittedly groaned. In my opinion, the company’s last attempt at fusing digital and analog together was subpar. But with their second attempt in the form of the Fujifilm Instax Mini LiPlay, I’m pleasantly surprised and shocked. This is THE SMALLEST INSTAX FILM CAMERA. And not only is it small, but it reminds me of a suped-up compact camera from yesteryear while it also embraces lots of new fashionista influences. The Fujifilm Instax Mini LiPlay is going to appeal to so many different types of photographers. There is something here for not just the younger crowds but also the photographers who care about image quality. The lens on the Fujifilm Instax Mini LiPlay is one of the sharpest I’ve seen and used; it moves the camera away from plastics to glass. Then there is the Bluetooth accessibility that allows a photographer to wirelessly control the camera from the app. Indeed, Fujifilm packed a whole lot into the Fujifilm Instax Mini LiPlay.

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The Phoblographer’s Guide to Kodak Film for Professional Photographers

Kodak film is some of the best that you’re going to find on the market; and for good reason too!

The world of analog film photography is one currently experiencing a Renaissance; and at the forefront of it is Kodak film. Kodak is the last big company producing film that hasn’t cut emulsions but instead is bringing out new ones. Professional photographers used to use Kodak film for years and today the new breed of analog photographers does just that. There are a number of options for photographers to get into–with some of the tried and true emulsions being both Kodak Tri-X and Kodak Portra. Look around the web, and you’ll see tutorials and presets for digital photographers to get the look of these films. But no matter how hard they try, they just don’t recapture the magic of film.

We’ve reviewed every professional film emulsion that Kodak offers, and so we’re rounding up our reviews for you in one spot.

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The Phoblographer’s Guide to Lomography Film in 35mm and 120 Formats

Lomography isn’t a company that should be disregarded; they’ve got some fantastic films.

While some photographers look at Lomography as a reseller due to their rebadging of certain film emulsions, I don’t think that one can question just how much they’ve done for the analog film photography movement. The company that used to be branded as just a Hipster camera organization has grown and matured over the years into something else–creating many of their own unique lenses and taking advantage of just how well Instax does. If you’re looking for something sustainable and yet very good, you should consider their films.

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Film Emulsion Review: Kodak Ektachrome E100 (35mm, 2018 Emulsion)

We’ve been waiting for the Kodak Ektachrome to come out for a long time, and it’s just the way that we remembered it.

Kodak Ektachrome E100 was announced to be coming back to the market in 2016; and though Kodak took its time getting it back to the market, I’m elated to say it’s finally here! Before it’s latest death, Kodak Ektachrome was deemed by Kodak to be a replacement for Kodachrome. But indeed, it has never looked like that. Instead, Kodak Ektachrome has both a saturated look to it while also remaining pretty low contrast in its appearance and in comparison to the Slide film emulsions offered by Fujifilm. At the moment, it’s also still pretty tough to get your hands on some.

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Cool, Vintage Vending Machine Produced Kodak Roll Film

Today on awesome analog finds, we present to you this snapshot of a vintage vending machine that dispensed 620, 120, and 127 Kodak film rolls!

Once upon a time, film was the only way to go when one wanted to delve into photography. Equipment from cameras down to the films and chemicals used to develop them were widely available, so much so that there even used to be coin-operated vending machines that dispensed roll films!

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Film Emulsion Review: KOSMO Foto Mono (35mm Emulsion)

KOSMO Foto Mono has to be one of those weird black and white films that I’m probably not understanding.

The film renaissance has given us a number of fantastic new film emulsions that we should all be supporting in some way or another, and for the sake of KOSMO Foto Mono I genuinely hope that everyone and their mother finds out about it. I’ve shot a number of photos with KOSMO Foto Mono loaded into my Hexar AF that I’m completely over the moon about. When it was first announced, there were photographers on the web coming out with pitchforks and stating that it was just a rebranded Fomapan film. Indeed, it is a new film stock produced by Fomapan and Stephen Dowling, the man behind KOSMO Foto Mono, says that this is only the start of what he’s going to be doing.

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Film Emulsion Review: Kodak TMax P3200 (35mm, New Version)

Kodak TMax P3200 is one of the more exciting things to happen in film in a while.

It started with Kodak teasing the new Kodak TMax P3200 on Instagram and Twitter. Much unlike Ektachrome, Kodak TMax P3200 is actually real and you can buy it immediately. Indeed, they brought it back from the dead as the black and white film world was severely lacking in any sort of variety when it came to high ISO black and white films. Of course there’s Delta 3200, but otherwise there is nothing else out there. The re-release of Kodak TMax P3200 was seen by many to be a very good move and insight into Kodak’s commitment to film photography. At the moment, it’s only available in 35mm, but that’s more than enough for many photographers.

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Vintage Camera Review: Fujifilm Natura S (The Best Point and Shoot You’ve Never Heard Of)

The Fujifilm Natura S is quickly becoming my favorite point and shoot camera.

When you look on the market, you’re going to find stuff like Contax T2 to be very pricey. The chances that you’re not looking for the Fujifilm Natura S are high. But, the Fujifilm Natura S potentially has a lot more going for it than you’d think. This small point and shoot is easily pocketable and despite its very compact size, it sports a 24mm f1.9 lens. Yes, that’s right; that’s one of the widest and fastest lenses you can get on a point and shoot. It also comes in a variety of colors like green, the pink that I’ve gotten a hold of, and there is a variant called the Fujifilm Natura Black. There is also a version with a zoom lens simply called the Fujifilm Natura. But the Natura S is really where it’s at; its simple interface and not serious look is going to guarantee that you take it with you everywhere.

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The Top Three 35mm Film Cameras for Photography Students

In traditional school or the school of life, learning photography with 35mm film is fun at any age and will make you a better digital photographer as well.

While it’s hard not to see the endless announcements of new-better-bigger digital cameras and accessories, slowing down and rolling some film will help you become a better photographer faster than relying on a computer with a lens attached on the front. If you want to become a better photographer, make photographs. That means being present to what you want to create, shooting film, trips to the lab and making prints. If you have not shot film, the experience is both fun and liberating, free of notifications popping up, and that old camera smell when you hold it up to your face as well as just the overall experience can be therapeutic.

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The Phoblographer’s Guide to CineStill Film Emulsions

We’ve reviewed and tested every CineStill film emulsion in both 35mm and 120.

I like to think that CineStill had a fairly big part in the revival of analog film culture. Indeed they did something no one else was doing and even today no one else really does. Yet in many ways, what CineStill does is something that has been around for years. The company takes movie film stock, modifies it to be developed with standard film development processes, and cuts it for photographers. It has resulted in some film emulsions that are incredibly unique if not the most unique on the market. By and large, they’re one of my personal favorite film manufacturers. Over the years, I’ve reviewed all their film emulsions and am now providing a comprehensive guide to their film.

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Film Emulsion Review: Fujifilm Velvia 100 (35mm and 120)

Fujifilm Velvia 100 isn’t as appreciated as Fujifilm Velvia 50, but it should be!

Here’s one of those stories and moments that I’ve said all too many times when it comes to film and film photography; over and over again I was told that Fujifilm Velvia 100 isn’t worth the money or the hassle. But instead, Velvia 50 was where it was at and there was no exception to that rule. In my re-education of film photography, I found many of the things that photographers said over the years to be simply untrue. Kodak Tri-X isn’t the end all and be all of film photography. Velvia 50 isn’t the end all and be all of landscape photography either. But instead, Fujifilm Velvia 100 is a really, really solid film. It’s gorgeous in so many ways but like all film emulsions, it shines the larger you go.

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Film Emulsion Review: Ilford FP4 Plus 125 (35mm and 120)

Ilford FP4 Plus 125 is one of the more unique films on the market.

Since learning about what it could do years ago, I’ve had an affinity for Ilford FP4 Plus 125, but also understood that it isn’t a jack of all trades type of film. Instead, Ilford FP4 125 is what I’d like to call a film that you’d try to shoot high contrast with, but with the knowledge that the shadows are going to be opened up no matter what. In fact, that’s really what this film is all about. You’re often encouraged to underexpose it to get more from the highlights and have the shadows be taken care of in the processing. Available in both 35mm and 120 film stocks, Ilford FP4 125 can be really beautiful in the right hands. While I may instead reach for CineStill bwXX for portraits, I’ve found Ilford FP4 Plus 125 to be best for things like street and abstract, architecture photos.

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“The Developist” Is a DIY Semi Automated Assistant for Home Developing

Developing your own films at home could be easier if you have an “assistant” like “The Developist.”

Home developing is a relatively easy task that gets easier once you get the hang of it. But of course, if there’s something that can make it easier right off the bat, we’d all take it. We always tip our hat for anyone brave enough to put together their own tools, processes, and even machines to make home developing easier and more sophisticated. Today, we’re sharing an interesting prototype for a home developing assistant called “The Developist” with our film photographer readers.

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