First Impressions: Sony RX100 VI (Sony’s Camera for Street Photographers?)

The Sony RX100 VI is promising a lot of big upgrades

Sony’s latest premium point-and-shoot covers a huge focal range in a compact package, and will surely fit the needs of street photographers looking to be as unobtrusive as possible. During the camera’s announcement day, we had some time to walk around and play with the camera. So far, it seems a bit hit or miss.

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Review: Sony a7 III (What Sony Calls the Basic Camera)

The Sony a7 III surely is a great camera, but who is it really for?

I got the chance to spend time with the Sony a7 III in Las Vegas and then again here in NYC; and after all the time I spent with the camera I am not sure who the customer is that may purchase it. There are three mindsets here: those who need really fantastic high ISO output, those who need high resolution, and those who need a combination of both. All of these are fulfilled by the Sony a7s, Sony a7r and the a9 respectively. But with the Sony a7 III you’ve got a camera that is more or less a very stripped down a9. Sony targets this camera at enthusiasts though it’s more than good enough for professional use providing you’re not taking it into a lot of dust or rain. To get the most from it you’ll need to pair it with some top notch glass. It can make for a solid second body and can surely fulfill all the needs of most photographers. But as I found while being a Sony a7 owner and upgrading to the Sony a7r III, there is a chance that its light isn’t going to shine as bright as the other options in the Sony line up.

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The Meyer-Optik-Görlitz Nocturnus III 50 f0.95 Promises Gorgeous Bokeh

The Meyer-Optik-Görlitz Nocturnus III 50 f0.95 was designed for full frame cameras, but is coming in Sony, Fujifilm and Leica M mounts

It’s been a little while since we’ve heard anything from Meyer-Optik, but now we’ve got something brand new: the Meyer-Optik-Görlitz Nocturnus III 50 f0.95. This new lens is promising to have some of the most gorgeous bokeh with its 15 aperture blades–that’s much more than many modern lens options. The lens, like many of the other options out there, is manual focus and of an all metal build, and is designed to come in either silver or black. Even more interestingly, the lens starts out at f0.95 and stops down to only f11. Weird, right? Well, not really.

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Review: Fujifilm X-H1 (The Perfect Fuji with a Big Problem)

The Fujifilm X-H1 is the company’s most curious camera yet.

When the rumors of the Fujifilm X-H1 were circulating, it seemed as if all were good, at least on paper. The Fujifilm X-H1 is being billed as the flagship X series camera and addresses a number of concerns photographers and users have had for a while. It has 4K video at a number of frame rates and with high quality options including F log and 200MB/second. Then there have been enhancements to the autofocus, weather sealing enhancements, and some ergonomics changes to make the camera more like a DSLR without a mirror and pentaprism. At the heart, it’s using the same 24MP APS-C sensor many of Fuji’s other cameras use. And in truth, the Fujifilm X-H1 is a really excellent camera. But at the same time, this is hands down the camera with the worst ergonomics I’ve ever felt from Fujifilm.

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First Impressions: Hasselblad H6D-400C Multi-Shot (Medium Format)

The Hasselblad H6D-400C Multi-Shot is overkill for most photographers.

I’m starting the first impressions post on the Hasselblad H6D-400C Multi-Shot with this extremely obvious statement and with an emphasis on the fact that complaining about something like this is useless. There’s bound to be someone that’s going to say, “That’s so expensive.” Well, you’re surely not the customer the Hasselblad H6D-400C Multi-Shot is directed at. I mean, do you own a museum? Do you have need to documenting something at a larger than life detail? Do you need a fantastic tethered workflow? Do you even have a tripod designed to hold such a beast? The honest answer for most of us pedestrians is no–we’re not that high up in the food chain of photography. But the MET and other museums like the Smithsonian or the US government surely have a need for a camera like this. To refresh your mind, the Hasselblad H6D-400C Multi-Shot is a 100MP medium format camera back unit. For those that don’t understand, traditional medium format consisted of a camera body, a camera back with the sensor and brains, and the lens. So you’re essentially shelling out a whole lot of money for a sensor and brains.

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Extended First Impressions: Sony a7 III in Las Vegas

I spent a few days with the new Sony a7 III and I came back sort of intrigued.

“Oh dear.” is what I literally said to myself while sick in bed at the W Hotel when Sony announced the Sony a7 III. My expression came from watching Sally Watson’s Live Stream and was more of a commentary on the fact that Sony is calling the Sony a7 III the “Basic” camera. Basic, to me, has never been a really great thing. When I hear the word Basic, I think about some of the worst things that have come about from our society: Bud Light, Instagram stories where you always have cat ears on your head, the Bachelor, tech bros who want to treat chickens well so that they can jack the price up on their eggs, and McDonalds when you’re not piss drunk. Nonetheless, I was very happy to try the camera even though I went into it with treating it almost like Sony’s version of a full frame Canon Rebel DSLR. In hindsight, I was mistaken to do this; it’s still far better than the Canon 6D Mk II in every way. Sony’s strategy of bringing features from the Sony a9 and Sony a7r III down to a simplified and more bareboned device is a great one that enables them to keep the price point down pretty well at $1,998 for the Sony a7 III body only.

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Sony A7 III Initial Impressions and Sample Images

Sony says they are setting a new bar for the ‘basic’ full frame camera with today’s A7 III announcement at WPPI in Las Vegas.

We were somewhat surprised when Sony launched their A7R III back at PPE, mainly because Sony had traditionally announced the standard A7 model before the S and R models. But if you have ever heard the saying ‘good things come to those who wait,’ you will be a very happy camper with today’s A7 III announcement, which shows that Sony isn’t resting on their laurels. It’s also a warning shot to any potential future full frame mirror less competitors: they have some big shoes to fill if they plan to challenge the Sony E Mount lineup at all.

We are here in Vegas covering the launch of the A7 III. Since we have had our hands on the camera, and were allowed to take some shots, we are coming to you here with our (very) initial thoughts on the Sony A7 III. Let’s jump right on in… Continue reading…

First Impressions: Fujifilm X-H1 (The New Flagship)

Fujifilm isn’t messing around; The X-H1 looks like a beast on paper… but how is it in person? Let’s find out.

On Thursday, Fujifilm launched their new flagship X-Series camera, the X-H1. To put it simply this is more than just the new kid on the block. This camera has some serious features and usability improvements over the previous X-Series cameras that will no doubt make the Fujifilm ecosystem even more attractive to both photographers AND videographers. We were invited out to LA for the Fujifilm X-H1 launch event, and as a part of the evening we were able to get our hands on the X-H1 for some initial impressions before we get our actual review unit sometime in the next week or two. Continue reading…