Review: Sony a7r III (The Camera So Many of Us Have Been Waiting For)

The Sony a7r III is one of the most perfect Sony cameras to date.

I used to borrow a joke from my buddy David Schloss that Sony got things 80% right 100% of the time; but with the new Sony a7r III I genuinely feel like they’ve done a significantly better job than that. Based on just the specs alone, I had to buy the Sony a7r III from Adorama. When the camera actually got into my hands, I was even more amazed at how great it is. Sony’s cameras have been continually improved over and over again and for the first time, a studio photographer has access to almost everything that they could possibly need with a Sony mirrorless camera. Not only do to have a fantastic 42MP full frame sensor with 15 stops of dynamic range at lower ISO settings, but you’ve got pretty decent autofocus performance, WiFi, weather sealing, better battery life, and that joystick that we’ve been begging for for years now. When you combine this with the fantastic support from Profoto, Godox, and Flashpoint amongst others in the flash system world, then you’ve got a genuinely complete system with a massive selection of lenses.

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Review: Leica CL Digital (Starring the New Leica 18mm f2.8)

The Leica CL digital is finally here; and it performs admirably.

The Leica CL digital is a camera I’ve been waiting a while for; almost 10 years now. But if you rewinded back to the technology world 10 years ago, you saw that mirrorless cameras weren’t even a thing yet, and the Leica M9 hadn’t even launched. Indeed, many photographers have been waiting for a Leica CL digital–something like an M series camera but smaller, more affordable and well built. The newly announced Leica CL digital has design cues harkening back to the original M series cameras but fully embracing the L mount system that is shared between the Leica TL series and the Leica SL series of cameras. With that said, the Leica CL digital houses an APS-C sensor at the heart. So while it isn’t an M mount camera or a full frame camera, it indeed does show Leica has been paying attention to folks.

The Leica CL digital performs very well in most situations; but I think my sentiment is shared with other Leica users that some sort of small M series camera would have been ideal.

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Sample Gallery: Sony a7r III RAW Files Edited in Capture One

The Sony a7r III seems to have a sensor that allows for ultimate versatility

We’re currently in Sedona, Arizona with Sony and a number of other journalists using the Sony a7r III camera along with some of the company’s latest lenses. Additionally, I’ve been testing the Sony a7r III with the Profoto B1 and the Profoto A1. We’ve been shooting a number of landscapes, portraits, sports, and documenting decisive moments with this camera. Thus far, the Sony a7r III seems really fantastic as a mirrorless camera but there are still a few quirks. However, the good far outweighs the bad.

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First Impressions: Polaroid Originals One Step 2

The Polaroid Originals One Step 2 is a throwback to the classic camera.

If you use the Polaroid Originals One Step 2, you’ll probably be really enamored with its retro aesthetics if you’re not put off by its chunky size. But I thought the same thing about the Instax Mini 8 and other cameras; and they sell out really well. While I’d prefer a camera like the SX-70, I can see how and why folks will like the Polaroid Originals One Step 2. If you owned or used the Impossible Project’s I-1 camera, then you should know that the new Polaroid Originals One Step 2 camera has more or less the same type of body. Of course, it isn’t as advanced as the I-1: it doesn’t have wireless connectivity via Bluetooth. But you’ll also not be too worried about the pretty low price tag associated with the camera.

And perhaps most interesting is the claim of a 60 day battery life.

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Review: Fujifilm X-E3

The Fujifilm X-E3 will have what most photographers need in a rangefinder style camera body.

When the Fujifilm X-E3 was announced, I was both hopeful and optimistic. You see, I wasn’t a big fan of the previous iteration: the Fujifilm X-E2s. It was more or less just a Fujifilm X Pro 1 without the OVF option. But with the Fujifilm X-E3 you get a lot of what the Fujifilm X Pro 2 offers without the weather sealing and the OVF. The cameras share the same 24MP APS-C X Trans sensor, autofocus system (for the most part), 4K video (with firmware updates), and functionality. The biggest differences though come with the ergonomics and how those translate into ease of use. The Fujifilm X-E3 is the first ILC camera in Fujifilm’s lineup to really use the touchscreen. I did a video about this feature a while back and even now I find it fairly difficult to use. It isn’t the most responsive and it’s the absolute best and fastest way to access some settings quickly. For example, the Fujifilm X-E3 doesn’t have the X Pro 2’s dual ISO and shutter speed dial, and instead you need to assign it to a function button or use the screen.

While the Fujifilm X-E3 is a solid performer all around though, photographers who prefer the feel and operation of the Fujifilm X Pro 2 will probably not be happy here.

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A Video Walkthrough of the New Sony a7r III

Sony’s Mark Weir walks us through the new Sony a7r III

At Photo Plus Expo, we got a moment to chat with Sony’s very own Mark Weir about their new Sony a7r III. This camera is one of Sony’s latest and greatest and offers up a whole lot of upgrades for the photographer who wants and needs a lot of versatility with their RAW files. It isn’t exactly like the company’s A9, but it takes a lot of features from that camera and brings them to the Sony a7 series.

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Hands on: Phase One IQ3 Trichromatic Sensor Digital Back

We got to get Hands on with the Phase One IQ3 Trichromatic Sensor Digital Back

At the recent Photo Plus East, we got to talk to Doug Peterson from Digital Transitions about the new Phase One IQ3 Trichromatic sensor. Most photographers probably won’t understand what’s so different about it, but if you’re a stickler for color in the same way that I am, then you’ll understand why I’m so incredibly smitten with the idea. Lots of photographers will talk about high ISO and dynamic range–but all of that is easily fixable with today’s software. When you get into color and the fine gradation elements, you start to look at things in a much different way.

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Review: Lomography Simple Use Cameras

The Lomography Simple Use Cameras can easily be mistaken for disposable cameras, but they’re in fact not. Confused? Yeah, I was too the first time that I saw the press release, as when I looked at the cameras themselves, they straight up just looked like disposables. Then I did more digging. Lomography calls them the Simple Use cameras. They’re designed to look and function like disposable cameras but have some extra additions–like the ability to be reloaded and in some cases gels that go right over the flashes. They also cost a bit more than the standard disposable camera out there, but when you consider the fact they’re reloadable and in some cases they come with gels for the flash, then you’re not at all getting a bad deal.

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