First Impressions: Hasselblad H6D-400C Multi-Shot (Medium Format)

The Hasselblad H6D-400C Multi-Shot is overkill for most photographers.

I’m starting the first impressions post on the Hasselblad H6D-400C Multi-Shot with this extremely obvious statement and with an emphasis on the fact that complaining about something like this is useless. There’s bound to be someone that’s going to say, “That’s so expensive.” Well, you’re surely not the customer the Hasselblad H6D-400C Multi-Shot is directed at. I mean, do you own a museum? Do you have need to documenting something at a larger than life detail? Do you need a fantastic tethered workflow? Do you even have a tripod designed to hold such a beast? The honest answer for most of us pedestrians is no–we’re not that high up in the food chain of photography. But the MET and other museums like the Smithsonian or the US government surely have a need for a camera like this. To refresh your mind, the Hasselblad H6D-400C Multi-Shot is a 100MP medium format camera back unit. For those that don’t understand, traditional medium format consisted of a camera body, a camera back with the sensor and brains, and the lens. So you’re essentially shelling out a whole lot of money for a sensor and brains.

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Extended First Impressions: Sony a7 III in Las Vegas

I spent a few days with the new Sony a7 III and I came back sort of intrigued.

“Oh dear.” is what I literally said to myself while sick in bed at the W Hotel when Sony announced the Sony a7 III. My expression came from watching Sally Watson’s Live Stream and was more of a commentary on the fact that Sony is calling the Sony a7 III the “Basic” camera. Basic, to me, has never been a really great thing. When I hear the word Basic, I think about some of the worst things that have come about from our society: Bud Light, Instagram stories where you always have cat ears on your head, the Bachelor, tech bros who want to treat chickens well so that they can jack the price up on their eggs, and McDonalds when you’re not piss drunk. Nonetheless, I was very happy to try the camera even though I went into it with treating it almost like Sony’s version of a full frame Canon Rebel DSLR. In hindsight, I was mistaken to do this; it’s still far better than the Canon 6D Mk II in every way. Sony’s strategy of bringing features from the Sony a9 and Sony a7r III down to a simplified and more bareboned device is a great one that enables them to keep the price point down pretty well at $1,998 for the Sony a7 III body only.

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Sony A7 III Initial Impressions and Sample Images

Sony says they are setting a new bar for the ‘basic’ full frame camera with today’s A7 III announcement at WPPI in Las Vegas.

We were somewhat surprised when Sony launched their A7R III back at PPE, mainly because Sony had traditionally announced the standard A7 model before the S and R models. But if you have ever heard the saying ‘good things come to those who wait,’ you will be a very happy camper with today’s A7 III announcement, which shows that Sony isn’t resting on their laurels. It’s also a warning shot to any potential future full frame mirror less competitors: they have some big shoes to fill if they plan to challenge the Sony E Mount lineup at all.

We are here in Vegas covering the launch of the A7 III. Since we have had our hands on the camera, and were allowed to take some shots, we are coming to you here with our (very) initial thoughts on the Sony A7 III. Let’s jump right on in… Continue reading…

First Impressions: Fujifilm X-H1 (The New Flagship)

Fujifilm isn’t messing around; The X-H1 looks like a beast on paper… but how is it in person? Let’s find out.

On Thursday, Fujifilm launched their new flagship X-Series camera, the X-H1. To put it simply this is more than just the new kid on the block. This camera has some serious features and usability improvements over the previous X-Series cameras that will no doubt make the Fujifilm ecosystem even more attractive to both photographers AND videographers. We were invited out to LA for the Fujifilm X-H1 launch event, and as a part of the evening we were able to get our hands on the X-H1 for some initial impressions before we get our actual review unit sometime in the next week or two. Continue reading…

First Impressions: Panasonic GX9 (Micro Four Thirds, Sample Images Included)

There seems to be a lot of promise with the new Panasonic GX9.

Not long ago, rumors abounded on the web of the Panasonic GX9–and admittedly when I was called into Panasonic’s headquarters to see the camera, I didn’t honestly think that I should really believe it to be anything seriously cool at all. But if I’ve learned anything in this industry, I can be pretty difficult on entry level products, and that’s sort of what the Panasonic GX9 seems like in some ways, or at least as it seems targeted to the mid-range consumer. In fact, one of the absolute biggest pushes for the camera has to do not only with the ergonomic changes, but they seem to be taking a page out of Olympus’ book with the Olympus Pen F and their Monochrome mode that delivered images I couldn’t get enough of.

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Review: Leica TL2 (The Camera I Never Thought I’d Like)

The Leica TL2 is more or less like an iPhone with interchangeable lenses. But the tech inside is really quite good.

When the Leica TL2 was offered to me for review, I was a bit on the fence about it. Though I had only spent brief periods of time with it in the past, I genuinely thought of it as something like the Canon Rebel of mirrorless cameras in the Leica lineup. But in truth, I was very wrong. The Leica TL2 is a mirrorless camera designed for rich enthusiasts. I wouldn’t do a job with it, even though I can, due to its quality. But what’s most amazing about the camera is not only its build quality, but the fact that it takes really great images. Part of this is thanks to the fantastic Leica lenses for the system. When you hold the Leica TL2, you begin to realize it is a piece of kit that really shouldn’t be discounted at all.

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Review: Sony a7r III (The Camera So Many of Us Have Been Waiting For)

The Sony a7r III is one of the most perfect Sony cameras to date.

I used to borrow a joke from my buddy David Schloss that Sony got things 80% right 100% of the time; but with the new Sony a7r III I genuinely feel like they’ve done a significantly better job than that. Based on just the specs alone, I had to buy the Sony a7r III from Adorama. When the camera actually got into my hands, I was even more amazed at how great it is. Sony’s cameras have been continually improved over and over again and for the first time, a studio photographer has access to almost everything that they could possibly need with a Sony mirrorless camera. Not only do to have a fantastic 42MP full frame sensor with 15 stops of dynamic range at lower ISO settings, but you’ve got pretty decent autofocus performance, WiFi, weather sealing, better battery life, and that joystick that we’ve been begging for for years now. When you combine this with the fantastic support from Profoto, Godox, and Flashpoint amongst others in the flash system world, then you’ve got a genuinely complete system with a massive selection of lenses.

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