Review: Nikon D850 (A Fantastic DSLR, But I’m Over DSLRs)

The Nikon D850 surely has to be one of our new favorite DSLRs.

If you look around at various reviews of the Nikon D850 on the web, they’ll most likely rate it as one of the best cameras ever made thus far. In truth, it really does perform very admirably and it absolutely does have a great sensor at the heart. Professional photographers considering making some sort of move since the Nikon D810 hadn’t been updated in awhile have an option that is going to last them a few more years before the industry changes yet again. That statement is more or less the basis of my review. The days of being able to know that your camera won’t be updated for four years are probably gone, but that doesn’t mean you won’t be able to take great photos with it long after it has been updated by some shiny new thing. The Nikon D850 is a fantastic image taking device and tool in the hands of the right photographer. It has a lot of great technology at the heart, but a part of me is wondering about its futureproofing.

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On Traveling with Film: 5 Reasons Why It’s So Incredible

Having the right camera with you on your travels is a vital step in any successful trip. Perhaps you already choose to travel with one or several trusted film cameras, and have reasons of your own for doing so. I wasn’t always a film camera traveler, but after years of tentative trials, I’ve now come around to the analog adventurer side. If you’re still mostly a digital photographer on the road, but curious about the other option, stick around. I’ve now traded my SD cards in for a bag full of film, and I don’t plan on going back.

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First Impressions: Polaroid Pop (Square Format zINK Paper)

The Polaroid Pop isn’t from the company Polaroid Originals–and that’s absolutely showing in every single way. By all means, this is a digital camera designed to simulate the Polaroid and Instant film experience without using anything nearly close to the original film. The new zINK paper is designed to be more square in format to seem a bit more like what the Impossible Project tried for years to keep alive and that Polaroid Originals now manufactures. So at a recent event here in NYC, I had the chance to play with the Polaroid Pop. I’ve tried some of the company’s other cameras and I simply cannot get behind the idea of zINK. The Polaroid Pop is really no exception.

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First Impressions: Sony RXO Action Camera

The Sony RX0 is the company’s answer to needing a high-end action camera for a number of reasons. Sports shooters will love it. Action shooters will love it. Heck, it’s honestly hard to not like it. There’s a 24mm f4 equivalent lens on the front and a 1 inch sensor behind that. Sony’s sensors have been stellar for years, and now this camera aims to challenge everything else on the market while giving a higher end experience at a fairly affordable price point. The Sony RXO is small, portable, and, once you understand how to use it, not incredibly difficult–though I’ll be the first one to admit that’s quite a hill to climb.

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A Common Mistake New Photographers Make: A Lack of Focus

In this blog article I will share a very useful tip which Brendan Van Son explained to me when I was on the second day of his photography workshop in Hucachina, Peru.  He saw what I was doing when trying to photograph the above scene and saw that I was making the same mistake that lots of photographers make when photographing landscapes and showed me where I was going wrong.  His advice helped me out a lot and enabled me to get a much better photograph.

Hucachina itself was so much fun.  It was really nice walking around the Oasis and taking in the Sun even though it was actually winter in Peru.  The fun really started though when we got some dune buggies and raced up and down the sand dunes!  It was a bumpy ride but incredible fun.  You can see all the fun that we had and hear me talk about my photos in the below video.

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Review: Canon 6D Mk II

I want to get something straight that not a lot of reviews are putting out there: the Canon 6D Mk II isn’t a bad camera, in fact for most people, it will be a pretty darned good one. But for the rest of us who are at a point where we are demanding more from our cameras and image quality, we shouldn’t even be looking at this one. In many ways, the Canon 6D Mk II is the modern Canon full frame Rebel. What do I mean by that? Canon has squarely given the camera enough features to please the folks who just want to move up to full frame and their current lineup of users. There’s nothing incredibly revolutionary about it and the folks at the NYTimes aren’t bound to write praises about it; but at the same time it isn’t a terrible camera at all.

But in every single way, it isn’t something I’d recommend to any sort of working pro or semi-professional except for perhaps portrait photographers.

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First Impressions: Fujifilm X-E3 (Sample Images Included)

I’m really glad that Fujifilm announced the Fujifilm X-E3 partially because the Fujifilm XE2s was such an absolute failure in my eyes. In many ways, it felt half-assed and due to its release after the announcement of cameras with the new 24MP X Trans sensor, its usage of the 16MP sensor seemed odd. Nonetheless, I believe that sensor’s output looked much more analog than the newer ones. With the Fujifilm X-E3 though, photographers are getting a camera that is perhaps one of Fujifilm’s most straightforward creations in a while. However, there are things that are sort of odd. It uses the same sensor as the company’s flagship cameras and includes 4K video, the joystick that every Fujifilm user pretty much demands at this point, and a shutter speed dial without the ISO setting incorporated (lest someone who doesn’t understand how to use the dial goes onto YouTube and creates a video about how terrible this one thing is when they’ve probably never shot with a film camera in their life).

No, with the Fujifilm X-E3 you’ve got a heavy emphasis on just the basics: exposure.

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First Impressions: Lomography Lomo’Instant Square

In the past few years, I’ve learned to trust in Lomography’s ability to churn out solid instant film cameras, and the Lomography Lomo’Instant Square seems to be every bit as solid as lots of camera I’ve seen thus far. It’s the first camera to use the Fujifilm Instax Square format that isn’t made by Fujifilm. With a very classic design that is sort of an ode to old Kodak instant film cameras, this is one of Lomography’s more curious cameras. Lomo decided to go with a glass lens, a bellows system, and more or less the same sort of system the previous Lomo’Instant cameras have had. It borrows a lot from them and personally speaking, I’m pretty glad that I backed it. For ethical reasons of running a photography blog, I typically don’t like to back Kickstarter campaigns, but this is one that I firmly believed in.

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