The Fujifilm X-E3’s Touchscreen Isn’t That Intuitive to Use (But This Will Help)

If you’re looking at the Fujifilm X-E3, then consider the following

We’ve called the Fujifilm X-E3 in for review, and we’ve been playing with it for a few days now. Many photographers are bound to love it due to the design aspects that were incorporated into it that took some thought. This is essentially a really stripped down Fujifilm X Pro 2 with more of an emphasis on gestures and using the touchscreen in addition to the few buttons and exposure controls that are available. Enthusiast photographers may really like this camera as will the folks who these days love shooting in ISO auto mode. But what I’m finding so far is that the touchscreen isn’t the simplest thing to use.

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The Meural Canvas: An Interactive Photo Frame That Responds with Gestures

If you haven’t heard of Meural, then the Meural Canvas may be something you’re going to want to pay attention to, photographers! The company has been around since 2014 and making art installations interactive and fun for artists everywhere–and that doesn’t just apply to hipsters. What’s special about the Meural Canvas is that you can think of it as a large sort of iPad but instead of responding to your interactions via the screen, all you need to do is wave your hand and swipe in order for the next photo to come up. That’s significantly tougher to explain about while reading a blog post, but like all other materialized art, you need to experience it in person.

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Review: Nikon D850 (A Fantastic DSLR, But I’m Over DSLRs)

The Nikon D850 surely has to be one of our new favorite DSLRs.

If you look around at various reviews of the Nikon D850 on the web, they’ll most likely rate it as one of the best cameras ever made thus far. In truth, it really does perform very admirably and it absolutely does have a great sensor at the heart. Professional photographers considering making some sort of move since the Nikon D810 hadn’t been updated in awhile have an option that is going to last them a few more years before the industry changes yet again. That statement is more or less the basis of my review. The days of being able to know that your camera won’t be updated for four years are probably gone, but that doesn’t mean you won’t be able to take great photos with it long after it has been updated by some shiny new thing. The Nikon D850 is a fantastic image taking device and tool in the hands of the right photographer. It has a lot of great technology at the heart, but a part of me is wondering about its futureproofing.

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First Impressions: Fujifilm X-E3 (Sample Images Included)

I’m really glad that Fujifilm announced the Fujifilm X-E3 partially because the Fujifilm XE2s was such an absolute failure in my eyes. In many ways, it felt half-assed and due to its release after the announcement of cameras with the new 24MP X Trans sensor, its usage of the 16MP sensor seemed odd. Nonetheless, I believe that sensor’s output looked much more analog than the newer ones. With the Fujifilm X-E3 though, photographers are getting a camera that is perhaps one of Fujifilm’s most straightforward creations in a while. However, there are things that are sort of odd. It uses the same sensor as the company’s flagship cameras and includes 4K video, the joystick that every Fujifilm user pretty much demands at this point, and a shutter speed dial without the ISO setting incorporated (lest someone who doesn’t understand how to use the dial goes onto YouTube and creates a video about how terrible this one thing is when they’ve probably never shot with a film camera in their life).

No, with the Fujifilm X-E3 you’ve got a heavy emphasis on just the basics: exposure.

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Fujifilm’s New X-E3 Shoots 4K, has Improved AF Tracking, and AF Joystick!

We have been hearing rumors now about the Fujifilm X-E3 for some time and now the wait is officially over, with the company making the announcement just a short while ago. This update brings the X-E line of cameras into the latest generation of Fujifilm technology and also comes with some exciting new additions!

Starting from the top, the Fujifilm X-E3 features the same 24.3MP X-Trans III sensor and X-Processor Pro combination that the rest of the latest generation Fujifilm cameras have, so image quality is likely to be nearly identical to the X-Pro2, X-T2, and X-T20. In addition to that though, the X-E3 also features a touchscreen as well as the much loved AF Joystick that was featured on the X-Pro2 and X-T2 (making the X-T20 the only odd man out).

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UPDATED First Impressions: Nikon D850 (The 45.7MP Full Frame Beast)

In what is perhaps one of the worst kept secrets of the year in the photo industry, the Nikon D850 is finally making its debut today. The Nikon D850 is the company’s latest update to the Nikon D810 and brings with it a number of pretty awesome features that are probably bound to keep Nikon users from going to something like a Sony a9 instead. For starters, the Nikon D850 has a brand new 45.7MP Full frame sensor–and they’re not saying who makes it. And as is very typical Nikon in the past few years, it goes down organically to ISO 64–which is fantastic news for us landscape and portrait shooters. But in addition to that, the Nikon D850 sports a touchscreen LCD, dual card slots, a diopter that goes to +/- 3, 7fps with expansion up to 9 when using the booster grip, an EXPEED 5 processor, ISO sensitivity to 25,600, focus stacking abilities, flash sync of 1/250th, weather sealing, 4K video options and much more.

Updated: September 13th 2017 with a sample image gallery

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Review: Sony a9

It took Sony long enough, but earlier this year the company announced a true flagship mirrorless camera: the Sony a9. The Sony a9 is designed to take on the likes of the Canon 1DX Mk II and the Nikon D5. It’s a camera designed for a photojournalist who needs not a whole lot of resolution but a balance between that and good high ISO output. To appeal to these photographers, Sony gave the Sony a9 an impressive 20 fps shooting ability with no blackout of the viewfinder. The autofocus is also very effective, and can be used with a variety of lenses designed for the Sony E mount. Other connections such as a built in ethernet port and dual card slots are also bound to be very valuable to these photographers. Indeed, the Sony a9 is a camera for the working pro who brings in gainful employment and taxable income using their camera. With that said, you’d be absolutely stupid to purchase this for street photography unless you’re making some serious money off of it–so just stop right there.

Despite how fantastic it is, Sony still hasn’t gotten it 100% perfectly right. But to be fair, neither have Canon or Nikon.

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Review: Fujifilm GFX 50S Mirrorless Medium Format Digital Camera

For years and years, a lot of us have been drooling over the idea of mirrorless medium format digital cameras, and the Fujifilm GFX 50S is one of the first offerings to make it onto the scene. Fujifilm opted to take the same route that Leica, Pentax and Hasselblad have done with a sensor built into a body vs the more traditional SLR styles of Phase One and some of Hasselblad’s lineup. The Fujifilm GFX 50s (price) you’d think would be targeted at the photographer who needs that kind of resolution, but instead it’s aimed at the photographer who typically uses a Canon 1Dx Mk II or Nikon D5 type of camera. Essentially, the highest end of the highest end. Weddings? Yup, this is for that. Sports? Well, that’s where Fujifilm starts to hit a wall.

However, the camera is an alternative option: opting instead for better resolution and a larger sensor in the same way that wedding photographers years ago reached for 645 medium format film cameras.

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