Pauleth Ip Pauleth Ip

Paul is a New York City based photographer, creative, and writer. His body of work includes headshots and commercial editorials for professionals, in-demand actors/performers, high net worth individuals, and corporate clients, as well as intimate lifestyle/boudoir photography with an emphasis on body positivity and empowerment. Paul also has a background in technology and higher education, and regularly teaches private photography seminars. When not working on reviews and features for The Phoblographer or shooting client work, Paul can be seen photographing personal projects around NYC, or traveling the world with his cameras in tow. You can find Paul’s latest work on his Instagram over at @thepicreative.

All articles by Pauleth Ip

 

Creating the Photograph: Claudia Paul’s “Red on Red”

Photographer Claudia Paul is a German-born, New York-based creative with over ten years of experience shooting editorial and commercial work. Her latest “Red on Red” concept is one that she’s been conceptualizing for some time. For a bit of background on Claudia, she works frequently with Non-Profits and utilizes the power of strong imagery to help create positive change in the world. She lends her self-described always personal approach to whatever the project might be with the goal of capturing authentic visuals. Claudia also runs a hands-on production company called Doppelganger Motion which focuses mostly on storytelling for small businesses and NGOs across the globe. She also recently joined the board of American Photographic Artists’ New York Chapter and is excited to strengthen the photo community and offer members crucial tools for growth....
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Review: Haida Red-Diamond 3 Stop Soft-Edge Graduated ND Filter

When photographing long exposure landscapes, a common challenge that many photographers encounter is the drastic difference between amount of light in the sky and below the horizon. This is where filters like the Haida Red-Diamond 3 Stop Soft-Edge Graduated ND Filter come in handy. Soft graduated neutral density filters allow you to expose for the darker areas of your frame without blowing out what’s in the sky....
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Loupedeck Introduces New Profile Creator For Their Loupedeck Creative Tool

Loupedeck is introducing the Loupedeck Profile Creator feature today for their recently launched Loupedeck Creative Tool editing accessory. The Loupedeck Profile Creator allows users of the Loupedeck Creative Tool to create unique profiles for any application aside from those already supported by the editing accessory. Photographers will be able to program custom actions and adjustments using shortcuts, keys, delays, and more without any programming know-how. For photographers and retouchers out there that like to stream their editing sessions, Loupedeck is also announcing their integration with Streamlabs as well. Head on after the jump for the full press release....
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Film Review: SILBERSALZ35 (A Game Changer for Film Photographers)

We first learned about Silbersalz35 during last year’s Photokina, and it was genuinely one of the most exciting developments we’ve seen in the analog photography space. While CineStill has made cinefilm accessible to stills shooters for quite some time now, what Silbersalz35 is offering with their various cine film emulsions are fundamentally different. Although both CineStill and Silbersalz emulsions are cut from the same Kodak Vision3 motion picture film stock, one fundamental difference separates the two. The Silbersalz35 emulsions are unmodified Kodak Vision3 film stock cut down to 35mm and retain the remjet layer, while CineStill had to remove the remjet layer native to the Vision3 film stock in order to make it possible to develop the film using the popular C-41 process. Traditionally, Kodak Vision3 required the use of the ECN2 development process that was both expensive and not readily available to still photographers....
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Review: Haida Red-Diamond 10 Stop ND 100x100mm Filter

Haida recently sent over one of their 10 Stop Red-Diamond ND 100x100mm Filters (3.0/1000x Density) for us to review alongside their M10 Filter Holder System. Neutral Density filters are particularly useful for photographers specializing in architectural, landscape, and travel photography, especially when shooting long exposures during daylight hours. ND filters helps to prevent your images from being totally blown out when shooting long exposures in brightly lit shooting conditions. They essentially serve as sunglasses for your cameras, helping to cut down on the amount of light that reaches your camera sensor. The Red-Diamond series is Haida’s latest generation of ND filters constructed from K9 optical borosilicate crown glass. An improvement on their existing NanoPro ND filter series, the Haida Red-Diamond ND filters feature larger rounded corners and are said to be shock proof. Like the NanoPro ND filters, the Red-Diamond filters are coated on both sides with a nano-coatings that waterproofs the filters while eliminating color casts. Additionally, the nano-coatings help to minimize reflections and scratches. When it comes to ND filters, they generally come in two varieties: circular ones that you can screw onto your lens’s filter thread or square and rectangular ones that you use with slot in filter holders. The benefit of a square/rectangular filter over a screw on one is that you can adapt a single filter easily across many different lenses instead of being limited by the filter threads of each lens....
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Review: Haida M10 Filter Holder System (A Quick & Modular Solution)

During last year’s PhotoPlus Expo, we were introduced to Chinese filter manufacturer Haida and their brand new M10 Filter Holder System. For many photographers, particularly those that specialize in landscape, architecture, and travel photography, neutral density filters play an integral role in their imaging workflow. If you’re like me and find yourself shooting with a variety of different lenses regularly, chances are most of these lenses will have different filter threads. ND filters aren’t cheap, and buying filters in multiple densities for each filter thread can put a huge dent in your wallet very quickly. Filter systems like the Haida M10 system are a much more cost efficient way to go, allowing you to adapt a set of filters across a variety of filter threads. Haida was kind enough to send over one of their M10 Filter Ho...
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Peripheral Review: LaCie Rugged SSD Pro (This Thing Is a Speed Demon!)

When the LaCie Rugged SSD Pro arrived for review, our expectations for the Thunderbolt 3 equipped external SSD were understandably high. We had previously reviewed LaCie’s non-pro version of the Rugged SSD (which utilizes USB-C rather than Thunderbolt 3) and was quite impressed by its performance and durability. Thunderbolt 3 has four times the maximum throughput of USB-C (40 Gbps vs 10 Gbps), so it stands to reason that the performance gains of the LaCie Rugged SSD Pro would be rather significant over its non-pro counterpart. Does the addition of Thunderbolt 3 justify the US $100 MSRP premium though? ...
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The New Seagate IronWolf 510 SSD Is for Creative Professionals

As the resolution of the latest digital cameras continues to increase, raw files have been ballooning in size as well. As a result, many photographers and creatives have turned to Network Attached Storage devices to centrally store and manage their data. For photographers and creatives with highly demanding workflows that involve working with massive amounts of data stored on NAS devices, Seagate’s brand new IronWolf 510 PCIe M.2 NVMe SSD was designed specifically with you in mind. With caching speeds of up to 3 GBps and 1.8 million hours MTBF (mean time between failures), the Seagate IronWolf 510 SSD is perfectly suited for multi-user creative environments that rely on cache-enabled NAS devices to operate around the clock. Head on after the jump for the full press release....
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This Reddit Thread Highlights a Common Issue with TFP Work

Shooting trade work (commonly referred to as TFP or Time For Prints/Trade For Photo) can be a great way for photographers and models alike to collaborate on personal projects. They are also excellent ways for those just starting out to gain experience and to experiment with new techniques. TFP shoots are collaborative endeavors, and everyone involved should ideally walk away having benefited from it in some way. Before embarking on collaborative projects of any kind, it’s important for all parties involved to communicate their intentions and expectations with one another openly. This ensures everyone involved is on the same page and helps to avoid misunderstandings down the line. Despite our best efforts though, issues can still arise from time to time due to miscommunication. Join us after the break as we explore one Redditor’s experience in one such situation....
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Camera Bag Review: WANDRD DUO Daypack (It’s Almost Perfect)

Let’s face it. As photographers, we sometimes have a tendency to overpack. We totally understand. It’s something that we’ve been guilty of before. In an ideal world, all of our gear would be easily accessible within arms reach. In reality, that’s far from practical. While the WANDRD DUO won’t help you haul your entire arsenal with you, it’s designed to carry just the right amount of gear you’ll need to get you through the day without weighing you down. It’s best described as a hybrid between an everyday carry bag and a traditional camera bag. The WANDRD DUO comes packed with a number of innovative features like the “Infinite Zip” access system and an integrated pop camera cube....
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First Impressions: Fujifilm X-T4 (A Ton of Updates You’ll Want to See!)

In what is perhaps one of the worst-kept industry secrets in recent memory, we can finally confirm that the Fujifilm X-T4 is indeed real. While the XT4 sports the same 26 Megapixel X-Trans BSI CMOS 4 Sensor and X-Processor 4 Quad-Core Imaging Engine as its roughly year and a half old predecessor, there are plenty of upgrades that make it a highly worthwhile upgrade. Chief amongst these upgrades are the 5-Axis In-Body Image Stabilization, the inclusion of a fully articulating touchscreen, as well as a brand new higher capacity battery. We got to spend some time with the Fujifilm X-T4 recently during a private media briefing. You can read all about our First Impressions after the jump....
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Peripheral Review: LaCie Rugged SSD (For Photographers On The Go)

When LaCie sent over their Rugged SSD for us to test out, the opportunity couldn’t have come at a better time. As a photographer that’s constantly traveling from one assignment to the next, I spend as much time working remotely on location (if not more so) than I do working from my office. Thanks to their speedy performance, Solid State Drives have become an invaluable part of my on-location workflow, which involves my having to juggle tons of mission-critical client files. Importing, managing, and backing up thousands of raw and finished images along with plenty of Capture One sessions to boot can take a long time, so every second saved goes a long way. Along with being significantly faster when compared to traditional magnetic disk drives, SSDs tend to be more robustly constructed as well due to their lack of moving parts. This does not make them immune to mechanical failures, however. Unfortunately for me, that’s precisely what happened to one of my external SSDs. The LaCie Rugged SSD is said to be dustproof, water-resistant up to one meter, crush-resistant by up to a two-ton vehicle, as well as being drop-proof up to three meters. Bold claims for sure, and after what happened to my last external SSD, I was eager to put the LaCie Rugged SSD to the test....
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Monitor Review: BenQ SW270C 27 Inch Monitor for Photographers

For a long time, photographers that do high-end printing or those working with images that have to accurately reproduce colors (such as product, fashion, or beauty photography for example) had to shell out serious moolah for professional-grade color-accurate monitors from companies like Eizo. These monitors are often prohibitively expensive, with price tags that easily rivaled the cost of some flagship camera bodies on the market. ...
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Review: Sony 200-600mm f5.6-6.3 G OSS Super Telephoto (Sony FE)

The Sony 200-600mm f5.6-6.3 G OSS Super Telephoto lens covers a versatile focal range that allows you to photograph subjects that are typically hard to reach. Naturally, this is a lens that belongs in the hands of sports and wildlife photographers. For a lens covering such a long focal range, the Sony 200-600mm f5.6-6.3 G OSS is surprisingly lightweight and relatively compact. Sports and wildlife photographers will surely appreciate the 200-600mm’s reliable autofocusing capabilities. Paired with the latest Sony Full Frame Mirrorless cameras, it’ll make short work of acquiring and tracking fast-moving subjects....
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Review: Tamron 24mm F2.8 Di III OSD M1:2 (Sony FE Mount)

Introduced late last year, the Tamron 24mm f2.8 Di III OSD M1:2 (Model F051) is part of a trio of affordably priced prime lenses designed for Sony Full Frame Mirrorless cameras. Lightweight and compact, the Tamron 24mm f2.8 is also said to be weather-sealed. It sports a magnification ratio of 1:2 and can focus as close as 4.7 in (12 cm). We’ve been putting the final production version of this ultra-wide-angle through a bevy of real-world tests during the last few weeks. Find out how the Tamron 24mm f2.8 performed in our full review....
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Review: Tamron 35mm F2.8 Di III OSD (Sony FE Mount)

Introduced during last year’s PhotoPlus Expo, the Tamron 35mm f2.8 Di III OSD M1:2 (Model F053) is part of a trio of compact and affordably priced prime lenses designed for Sony Full Frame Mirrorless cameras. The Tamron 35mm f2.8 is a lightweight and compact prime that’s said to be weather sealed. With a minimum focusing distance of just 5.9 in (15 cm) and a reproduction ratio of 1:2, the Tamron 35mm f2.8 lets you get up close and personal with your subjects. While our brief time with the lens during PPE had left us impressed, a review does not a 15-minute hands-on demo make. For the past month, we’ve been putting the final production version of the Tamron 35mm f2.8 Di III OSD M1:2 (Model F053) through its paces. Find out how it fared under real-world conditions in our full review. ...
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A Beginner Photographer’s Guide to the Exposure Triangle

Understanding the Exposure Triangle will help you navigate the relationships between Aperture, ISO, and Shutter Speed and make you a better photographer....
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Phoblographer’s Guide to the Top 10 Photography Terms for Beginners

So you just received a new camera as a gift during the winter holidays. Or perhaps you finally decided to take your interest in photography to the next level and graduated from your phone to a dedicated camera. You’ve taken the camera out of the box, but have no idea how to make sense of all the different dials and buttons. What do all the settings mean? If you’re feeling a bit overwhelmed, take a deep breath. It’s going to be OK! We’ve all been there....
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A Portrait Photographer’s Guide to Finding New Models to Photograph

Photography can often feel like a solitary pursuit, but certain genres of photography, particularly those that involve the making of portraits, intrinsically involve us as photographers working with others as our subjects. As a photographer that shoots a lot of commercial portraits, one of the questions that I am often asked by photographers starting out is how I go about finding new subjects to work with. Obviously, a lot of the people that I photograph are clients in need of new headshots or various types of portraiture work that seek me out or have been referred to me for my services, but for my personal projects, I tend to be the one reaching out to models. I’m a firm believer that photographing new subjects regularly is an integral and necessary part of developing and honing the skillset that is critical in being a good portrait photographer. Additionally, it plays a crucial part in helping you stay creative by allowing you to explore new concepts and experiment with new techniques. As it is with most things in life, the more extensive your experience, the better the quality of your portfolio, and the broader your connections are in the photography industry, the easier it will be for you to find new models to photograph. Here are some suggestions that you may find useful....
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Laptop Review: Razer Blade 15 Studio Edition (Photographers Rejoice!)

From a cursory glance, it’s easy to mistaken the mercury white Razer Blade 15 Studio Edition laptop for a MacBook Pro. The only real giveaway is the lack of a glowing apple on the Razer’s lid. Although Apple’s line of MacBook Pro laptops has been the go-to option for photographers and creatives for quite some time, an increasing amount of this user base has been jumping ship to Windows alternatives in recent years. Apple’s general lack of innovation, disappointing price to performance ratio, as well as the company’s heavy-handed walled garden approach to hardware and software development are just some of the reasons cited by those making the exodus from Macs to Windows. While tech-savvy photographers and creatives looking to get the most bang for their buck have been building their own Windows-based editing desktops or using gaming computers as a substitute, it wasn’t until recently that computer manufacturers began designing laptops specifically with creative professionals in mind. The Razer Blade 15 Studio Edition, a variant of the Razer Blade 15 Advanced that we had previously checked out, is one such laptop designed specifically to tackle the needs of professional photographers and creatives. The Razer Blade 15 Studio Edition laptop comes configured with a 9th generation Intel Core i7-9750H Hexa-Core CPU with a base clock speed of 2.6 GHz (overclockable to 4.5 GHz), a Nvidia’s workstation-grade Quadro RTX 5000 GPU with 16 GB of GDDR6 VRAM, 32 GB of DDR4 memory, along with a lightning-fast Samsung 1TB M.2 NVMe PCIe 3.0 x4 Solid State Drive. While this hardware combination certainly looked impressive on paper, it comes with an equally impressive price tag to match: US $3,999.99. We had to find out for ourselves if these specs translated to real-world performance, and if that asking price was warranted....
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Review: Olympus OMD EM5 Mark III (A Shrunken Down EM1 Mark II)

The last time Olympus introduced a new camera body in their E-M5 product line was back in February of 2015, more than four and a half years ago. To say that the E-M5 series was long overdue for an update would be quite an understatement. At long last, Olympus finally introduced the OM-D E-M5 Mark III earlier this year. Like the outgoing Mark II model, the EM5 Mark III is compact, lightweight, and features excellent weather sealing. The refreshed EM5 Mark III features the 20 MP Live MOS sensor, TurePic VIII Image Processor, and the same 121-point Phase Detection Autofocus System that we’ve previously seen within the EM1 Mark II, itself a now three-year-old camera. Was this update worth the four and a half year-long wait?...
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Canon Has Three Lenses That Can Really Take Next Level Portraits

One of Canon’s biggest strengths has always been their ability to design and produce excellent lenses. The optical qualities of Canon glass are legendary, renowned for their ability to produce images with excellent sharpness, render accurate colors, and deliver gorgeous, creamy bokeh. Canon lenses are robustly constructed as well. It’s not uncommon to see Canon shooters using lenses that are older than their camera bodies. Canon built these lenses to last and this is a testament to their build quality. This was true with their EF Mount DSLR lenses, and the tradition continues with their latest RF Mount Mirrorless glass as well....
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The Sony Lenses That Made Our Jaws Drop When Shooting Portraits

When Sony first entered the Full Frame Mirrorless market, one of their biggest pain points was their then-lackluster lens lineup when compared to industry veterans like Canon and Nikon. Fast forward to today, Sony now has 30 lenses available for their Full Frame E-Mount cameras, while Canon and Nikon are playing catch up with their mirrorless lens offerings. The tables have turned indeed. For portrait photographers shooting with Sony Full Frame Mirrorless cameras, there’s never been a better time to invest in some new glass. While Sony’s top tier G Master series of lenses have a proven track record of delivering excellent image quality with accurate colors and beautifully creamy bokeh, their more entry-level lenses are no slouch either....
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Review: Vi Vante Bengal Unleashed Lambskin Leather Camera Wrist Strap

For fashion-forward photographers out there that are in search of a new wrist strap for their cameras, Vi Vante’s Bengal Unleashed wrist strap may be just what they’re looking for. Made from ultra-soft lambskin leather, the Vi Vante Bengal Unleashed camera wrist strap is one of the most comfortable wrist straps that I’ve tried to date. Whether you’re looking to upgrade from the ho-hum branded camera strap that came included with your camera or simply prefer the lower profile nature of wrist straps over traditional neck straps, the Vi Vante Bengal Unleashed Lambskin Leather Camera Wrist Strap is worth considering....
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Instant Camera Review: Canon IVY CLIQ+ Instant Camera Printer

Instant cameras have made a huge comeback in recent years, and with it, so too has printing photos seen a resurgence in popularity. This is certainly a welcomed trend considering pretty much everyone has a camera in their pockets at all times these days, but the photos we take are seldom printed and instead find themselves stuck in digital limbo, never to be looked at again. The novelty of seeing a physical print come out of an instant camera never gets old, with people instinctively gathering for selfies whenever someone busts out an instant camera. Canon is hoping to tap into this market with the newest product in their IVY product line: the Canon IVY CLIQ+. The IVY CLIQ+ is an easily pocketable instant camera that also doubles as a mobile printer, allowing you to take photos and create prints on the fly using ZINK Zero Ink Technology. To add to the novelty factor, the ZINK prints have a peel-apart back that turns them into stickers as well. Does the Canon IVY CLIQ+ live up to the hype?...
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Review: Sony A7R IV (The Pound for Pound Resolution King)

Sony announced its latest high-resolution flagship Full Frame Mirrorless camera, the Sony A7R IV, earlier this summer, and was met with an overwhelmingly positive reception. At the heart of the Sony A7R IV is its brand new 61MP backside-illuminated sensor. As of press time, this sensor is the highest resolution sensor currently available in a Full Frame camera, taking the A7 series into medium format territory in terms of resolving power. The Sony A7R IV is packing the company’s latest generation AF technologies under the hood to compliment this beastly sensor, including Face & Eye AF for Humans and Animals, along with Real-time Tracking as well. The exterior of the A7R IV went also under the knife, resulting in a slightly larger body that includes a larger handgrip, better joystick, improved rear dial, a lockable Exposure Compensation dial, as well as upgraded buttons all around. The already excellent Electronic View Finder from the A7R III was also replaced with a higher resolution EVF that’s now capable of refreshing at up to 120 fps. Weather-sealing has been one of Sony’s pain points, but this too saw a major overhaul in the A7R IV. All of these improvements culminates into a camera that is designed clearly with the professional in mind. We’ve been shooting extensively with the Sony A7R IV since this summer, our full review is just after the jump....
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Review: Canon RF 85mm F1.2 L USM (Canon RF Mount)

One of Canon’s biggest strengths has always been their ability to create consistently excellent lenses targetted at professionals, and the Canon RF 85mm f1.2 L USM is no exception. With their RF Mount system, Canon has chosen to tackle the Full Frame Mirrorless market from the complete opposite direction as Sony did. Instead of focusing on industry-leading cameras first and slowly building up a portfolio of lenses like Sony did, Canon has elected to introduce premium lenses out of the gate while they work on developing newer, more advanced Full Frame Mirrorless camera bodies. Only time will tell if their strategy will pay off, but one thing’s for sure: the RF Mount lenses we’ve seen so far are some of the very best on the market today. The Canon RF 85mm f1.2 L USM was designed with portrait photographers in mind, and boy does it create some truly stunning portraits. By virtue of being a f1.2 lens, the Canon RF 85mm f1.2 L USM is bulky and has the weight (and price tag-US $2,699 as of press time) to match. If you’ve got deep enough pockets and won’t settle for anything but the very best, the Canon RF 85mm f1.2 L USM will not disappoint....
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First Impressions: Tamron 35mm F2.8 Di III OSD M1:2 (Sony FE Mount)

Last week at the annual PhotoPlus Expo in New York City, Tamron unveiled a trio of compact and lightweight prime lenses designed from the ground up for Sony’s E Mount Full Frame Mirrorless cameras. One of the lenses in this prime trio is the Tamron 35mm f2.8 Di III OSD M1:2 (Model F053). The newly announced Tamron 35mm f2.8 follows the same design philosophy of balancing a small footprint while maintaining portability like we’ve seen in the company’s excellent 17-28mm f2.8 Di III RXD and 28-75mm f2.8 Di III RXD zooms for Sony Full Frame Mirrorless. At just 7.4 oz, the Tamron 35mm f2.8 is remarkably lightweight. It’s also quite compact in size as well at just 2.5 inches in length (the 20mm and 24mm f2.8 primes also share the same exterior design and dimensions). We got to spend some brief hands-on time shooting with the brand new Tamron 35mm f2.8 at PPE, head on after the jump for our...
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First Impressions: Tamron 24mm F2.8 Di III OSD M1:2 (Sony FE Mount)

Tamron’s philosophy of designing practical lenses for Sony E Mount Full Frame Mirrorless lenses that are both lightweight and small in size has proven to be extremely popular, as is the case with their 17-28mm f2.8 Di III RXD and 28-75mm f2.8 Di III RXD zooms. The Japanese lens manufacturer is now turning their attention towards prime lenses, unveiling a trio of prime lenses designed from the ground up for Sony E Mount at the annual PhotoPlus Expo in New York City last week. The Tamron 24mm f2.8 Di III OSD M1:2 joins the 20mm and 35mm as part of Tamron’s Full Frame E Mount prime lens lineup, which follows the same design philosophy of balancing a small footprint while maintaining portability. The Tamron 24mm f2.8 is exceptionally lightweight, weighing in at less than half a pound. At just 2.5 inches in length, it also won’t take up much room inside your camera bag either. The 20mm and 35mm f2.8 primes weigh in at less than half a pound in weight as well and share the same exterior dimensions as the 24mm. Tamron was kind enough to let us shoot with the 35mm f2.8 during PPE....
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First Impressions: Sony A9 II (They Made It Better Than the Original)

At the beginning of this month, Sony announced the next iteration of its top tier A9 flagship, the A9 II. The most noticeable change Sony has made to the A9 II are the physical changes that borrows heavily from the A7R IV. These include the more pronounced handgrip, the improved buttons on the rear of the camera, as well as the improvements made to the various dials on top of the camera body. While the Sony A9 II retains the same 24.2 Megapixel Exmor RS sensor as the original A9, it is now paired with an upgraded BIONZ X image processor which leads to even faster AF/AE performance and accuracy. As expected, Real-time Eye AF, Real-time Eye AF for animals, and Real-Time Eye AF for video recording are all supported, and we expect Sony to introduce further improvements down the line with future firmware upgrades. The A9 II’s autofocus system can now track subjects continuously even if when shooting at apertures greater than f16. When shooting continuously, the Sony A9 II is capable of capturing images at up to 20 fps when using the electronic shutter, or 10 fps with the mechanical shutter (twice that of the original A9). Both card slots are both UHS-II compatible as well, which will surely help minimize the amount of time that images are stuck in the buffer waiting to be written. We got to spend some time shooting with the brand new Sony A9 II last week during PhotoPlus, head on after the jump for our first impressions of Sony’s latest flagship....
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Instant Camera Review: Canon IVY CLIQ Instant Camera Printer

The popularity of instant cameras have seen a huge resurgence in recent years, and the Canon IVY CLIQ is the company’s entry-level product targeted at this market. Fujifilm is currently dominating the instant camera market with their various Instax cameras and printers. Canon is hoping to compete by pricing the IVY CLIQ at just under US $100. Lacking some of the features of the more premium IVY CLIQ+, the IVY CLIQ is a no thrills instant camera that creates photo prints using Polaroid’s ZINK Zero Ink Technology. The prints have a peel-apart back that turns them into stickers as well. The compact size of the IVY CLIQ allows it to fit into most pants and shirt pockets, making it easy to carry around with you. Is the Canon IVY CLIQ the right instant camera for you?...
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The New DxO PhotoLab Is Aimed at Adobe Lightroom and Capture One

While DxO is known by many for their in-depth lab tests of cameras and lenses, they also offer a number of photo-centric software programs such as the popular Nik Collection of plugins as well as their own DxO PhotoLab raw editing software. Today, DxO is announcing version 3 of its DxO PhotoLab program, which is an alternative to Adobe Lightroom and Capture One Pro. Numerous new features are joining DxO PhotoLasb’s existing stable of technologies, including advanced optical corrections, U Point local adjustment technology, DxO Prime denoising technology, DxO Smart Lighting, DxO ClearView Plus, and DxO Lens Sharpness. These new features include a redesigned HSL (Hue, Saturation, and Luminance) adjustment tool called DxO ColorWheel, improvements to the Repair Tool, the introduction of a Local Adjustments Masks Manager, as well as the addition of keyword management support to DxO PhotoLibrary. Details on the new features coming to DxO PhotoLab 3 as well as pricing & availability can be found after the jump....
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First Impressions: Fujifilm X Pro 3 (We Did Street Photography with It!)

We first learned of the Fujifilm X Pro 3’s development last month. Yesterday afternoon, we got to spend some brief hands-on time shooting with the camera around New York City. The Fujifilm X Pro 3 incorporates the same 26.1MP X-Trans CMOS 4 APS-C sensor along with the X-Processor 4 Quad-Core Imaging Engine found within the X-T3 into a rangefinder-style body. The most notable design change from the X Pro 2 is that the rear of the camera now features an always-on but not backlit E-Ink display. This is designed to simulate the film box window found on many analog cameras. There’s still a touch screen LCD if you want it, accessible by flipping the back of the camera down....
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Review: Disk Drill Pro 4 (You Deleted Images You Needed, Didn’t You?)

We’ve all been there. It’s the middle of busy season and you’re shooting back-to-back-to-back events all weekend long. You’re at the sixth event of the weekend and you run out of space on your memory card in the middle of shooting. Naturally, you swap the card out for another one in your memory card wallet, format the card in-camera, and keep on shooting. You finally get home at the end of the night after photographing all weekend long, sink into your chair at your desk, and start importing everything you just shot into Capture One. Wait a minute, what happened to the images from the first event you shot yesterday? You start going through all of the cards in your memory card wallet frantically, popping them into your computer one at a time in a desperate attempt to locate the missing images until you come to the terrible and eventual realization that in the midst of shooting, you had accidentally formatted the wrong card. This is the stuff of nightmares for many photographers and unfortunately, it can happen to all of us. Although we always preach the importance of backing up your images, no drives are immune to hardware failure. in the event of severe hardware failures, sending your drives out to a data recovery company may be your last and only recourse and can be prohibitively expensive. But what if there was an affordable program that you can use at home or at your office to try to recover the data, and it doesn’t require you to have a degree in computer science to master? This is where Disk Drill Pro 4 comes in. Disk Drill Pro 4 is the latest version of the data recovery software that aims to help you rescue your precious data easily and quickly from the comfort of your own home. Keep ready to see whether or not Disk Drill Pro 4 can live up to its claims....
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First Impression: Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III

It’s been more than four and a half years since Olympus first introduced the OM-D E-M5 Mark II. Fans of the Micro Four Thirds Mirrorless camera have been waiting with baited breaths ever since for an eventual successor to be released. With much of the industry shifting its focus towards Full Frame Mirrorless cameras, it felt as though that day may never come. If you’re still holding out hope for an E-M5 successor though, you can finally breathe a collective sigh of relief because Olympus is officially announcing the release of the OM-D E-M5 Mark III today. Inheriting the 20 Megapixel Live MOS sensor and the TruePic VIII Image Processor that was first introduced in Olympus’s top tier E-M1 Mark II, the OM-D E-M5 Mark III is a lightweight, compact, and weather-sealed mid-tier M43 option for photographers looking for the right balance between performance and pocketability. With the introduction of the OM-D E-M5 Mark III (and the E-M1X before it back in January of this year), Olympus is making a definitive declaration that they remain dedicated to the Micro Four Thirds ecosystem. We got to spend some time in the literal wild shooting with the OM-D E-M5 Mark III last week in Moab, Utah. Was the E-M5 Mark III worth the long wait? Find out after the jump....
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Review: Amber (A Personal Hybrid Cloud Device for Photographers)

As photographers, the issue of where to store our images has been an age-old challenge that goes back to the analog days of prints and negatives. While the shift to digital meant that most of our images now exist virtually, we live in an age where everyone has a camera in their pockets, and the ever-increasing megapixel count has resulted in the continued growth of raw file sizes. Earlier this summer, we were introduced to a new NAS (network-attached storage) device called Amber from Silicon Valley-based startup LatticeWork. As the company’s cheeky marketing claims, Amber is not just “another pain in the NAS,” and aims to be a simple to set up and easy to manage hybrid cloud storage solution that leverages Artificial Intelligence to help keep everything organized. There are two versions of Amber are available. Amber One comes equipped with a pair of 1 TB hard drives, while Amber Plus doubles the capacity of the included hard drives. Storage capacity aside, Amber One and Amber Plus are functionally identical. LatticeWork was kind enough to send over an Amber One for us to review. Curious to see how it fared under real-world conditions? Read on to find out....
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How to Not Be a Jerk Photographing Cosplayers at New York Comic Con

Every October, thousands upon thousands make their pilgrimage towards Manhattan’s west side to the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center to attend New York Comic-Con as the annual celebration of their diverse fandoms, ranging from comic books, video games, movies, tv shows, pop culture, and everything in between. Last year’s NYCC had a record-breaking attendance of a quarter of a million people, and that number will likely increase this year. What was once considered geeky or nerdy are now woven into the fabric of pop culture itself, and in recent years, more and more people are now openly embracing and expressing their love of the numerous fandoms of which they’re a part of. For many convention-goers, cosplaying – the act of dressing up as and embodying their favorite characters – have become a rite of passage. The rise of cosplaying’s popularity has also led to an influx of photographers attending conventions like New York Comic-Con, whose main objective is to capture images of the many cosplayers roaming around the convention hall. If you happen to be one of these photographers, this article was written with you in mind....
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Review: Fujifilm Instax Mini Link Smartphone Instax Printer

Fans of Instax Mini prints will appreciate the usability refinements Fujifilm incorporated into their new Instax Mini Link smartphone printer. Fujifilm’s Instax line of instant cameras and mobile printers have been dominating the instant photography market. Today, they’re unveiling their brand new Instax Mini Link smartphone Instax printer. Instant cameras have seen a massive resurgence...
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Review: Lenovo Yoga A940 All-In-One PC (Is It for Photographers?)

The Yoga A940 All-In-One Desktop PC is Lenovo’s more affordable take on the Microsoft Surface Studio 2 concept designed with photographers and creative professionals in mind. Like the Surface Studio 2, the Lenovo Yoga A940 features a double-hinged high-resolution touch screen display attached to a base unit that houses the All-In-One’s components. Unlike the Surface Studio, Lenovo actually integrated a dedicated keyboard tray and QI wireless charging pad into the Yoga A940’s base unit. This makes for an arguably neater design, particularly if you like to store everything away neatly when not in use. Lenovo also includes all of the peripherals with the Yoga A940, which include a wireless keyboard, wireless mouse, Bluetooth Active Pen, and a Content Creation Dial. The Content Creation Dial is Lenovo’s spin on Microsoft’s Surface Dial, an optional accessory for the Surface Studio 2 that costs US $99.99. All of this adds up to a compelling All-In-One desktop solution, but how’s it fare under real-world use? Let’s find out....
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Lens Review: Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm F2.8 S (Nikon Z Mount)

When it comes to zoom lenses, the 24-70mm focal range is considered by many working photographers to be one of the “holy trinity” focal ranges, and is often the first zoom lens that many opt to purchase due to its versatility of being suitable for a huge variety of subject matter ranging from landscapes, real estate, street, solo to group portraiture, and so much more. While Nikon released a 24-70mm zoom to complement their Full Frame Z mount mirrorless cameras at launch, that particular lens had a maximum aperture of only f4 and many photographers interested in the Z mount cameras were left wanting for a faster alternative. Fast forward six months after Nikon introduced their Z mount cameras and the initial trio of lenses (35mm f1.8 Prime, 50mm f1.8 Prime, and the aforementioned 24-70mm f4 Zoom), Nikon officially unveiled the more premium Nikon NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f2.8 S. We got to spend some hands-on time with the lens while we were in Las Vegas for WPPI earlier this year, and Nikon was kind enough to provide us with a final production sample of the lens so that we can evaluate it thoroughly on our own terms. Head on after the jump to see how the Z mount 24-70mm f2.8 zoom performed during our real-world tests....
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Lighting Review: Fositan FL-1×2 Rollable LED Panel

A huge variety of LED lighting have been making their way onto the market in recent years, and a lot of photographers have begun utilizing them as a part of their constant lighting kit thanks to LEDs having power efficiency, increased light output, and generating little to no heat compared to legacy constant lighting options like incandescent or CFL bulbs. Westcott was arguably the first to introduce flexible LED panels to the photography market, and shortly after the Flex series of LED panels were released, a number of knockoffs began flooding the market at lower price points promising similar performance. Fositan’s FL-1×2 Rollable LED panel is one of them....
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Gear Review: X-Rite ColorChecker Passport Photo 2

While most modern digital cameras on the market today do a fine job of reproducing colors found in the real world, there is still room for improvement because most modern digital camera sensors interpolate much of the real-world colors as they can only record red, green, and blue. And although many photographers choose to express their creative visions when post-processing their images, certain workflows, such as when photographing products or high-end fashion for commercial clients, demand accurate and consistent colors. This is where the X-Rite ColorChecker Passport Photo 2 comes in. Working in conjunction with X-Rite’s own ColorChecker Camera Calibration software, the ColorChecker Passport Photo 2 is a reliable tool that helps photographers create accurate reference images under any lighting condition to ensure that their images feature consistently accurate colors. The folks over at X-Rite sent over a ColorChecker Passport Photo 2 for us to test out, and you can check out our full review after the jump....
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Steve Simon’s Empty Sky Explores the Immediate Post-9/11 NYC

It seems almost inconceivable that the attack on the Twin Towers occurred 18 years ago, given the fact that many of us still remember everything that happened on that fateful Tuesday morning so vividly as if it had just transpired. When we look back on the World Trade Center attack, we tend to see a lot of images of the Ground Zero itself along with the Twin Towers during and after the incident. If you were to look for images of the periphery and of the people drawn towards the area, there’s a chance that the photos were captured by photojournalist Steve Simon. Steve was actually scheduled to fly back to New York on September 11th and wound up returning a week later. His project, titled Empty Sky: The Pilgrimage to Ground Zero, is part of the 9/11 Memorial Museum’s permanent collection and focuses on the people looking towards and drawn to where the Twin Towers once stood, and the sweeping emotions that overwhelmed the air in the surrounding area in lower Manhattan. He has kindly taken time out of his busy schedule to recount his experiences while working on Empty Sky in the days and weeks immediately following the tragic events that transpired on September 11th, 2001....
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Lens Review: Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm F4 S (Nikon Z Mount)

The Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f4 S is an ultra-wide angle zoom designed for Nikon’s mirrorless Z mount cameras that is both lightweight and compact. At press time, the 14-30mm f4 is the widest autofocus Nikon Z mount lens currently available on the market. The Nikon Z 14-30mm f4 S is a welcomed addition to the nascent Z mount lens lineup which is about to celebrate its first birthday. One of the lens’ biggest selling points is its ability to accommodate threaded filters up front, a feature that is extremely rare to find on an ultra-wide lens which typically includes bulbous front elements and thus require the use of specialty filter mounting brackets. We first got to spend some time with the 14-30mm earlier this year in Las Vegas during WPPI and were eager to get our review unit so we could put it through its paces and thoroughly test it in the wild. Head on after the jump to see if the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f4 S is the right lens for you....
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New Sony Xperia 5 Android Smartphone Comes Loaded with Camera Tech

Today in the IFA 2019, Sony announced their next 5G Android smartphone: the Sony Xperia 5. Like the Sony Xperia 1 launched earlier this year at MWC Barcelona, the Xperia 5 incorporates many of Sony’s innovative Digital Imaging technologies, this time in a sleeker, more pocket-friendly package. Like the larger Xperia 1, the Sony Xperia 5 utilizes an OLED display with a 21:9 aspect ratio, albeit measuring 6.1″ diagonally this time around and packing a slightly lower 2520 x 1080 resolution due to the Xperia 5’s smaller dimensions. The Xperia 5 comes equipped with a trio of cameras, each covering a unique focal length: 16mm Ultrawide Angle, 26mm with Optical Image Stabilization, and 52mm Portrait/Telephoto with Optical Image Stabilization. The same dual photodiode/stacked CMOS image sensor technology used in Sony’s Flagship Full Frame Mirrorless A9 also powers each of the Xperia 5’s three cameras. The cameras in the Xperia 5 also borrowed a lot of the advanced autofocus tech found in Sony’s Alpha Mirrorless cameras, including advanced Eye AF and the ability to shoot at up to 10 fps with continuous AF/AE tracking. Video shooters will find lots to love with the Xperia 5 as well, including 10-bit 4:2:2 capture and s709-based color science adopted from Sony’s own Venice cinema cameras. Like the Sony RX100 Mk VII premium point-and-shoot, the Xperia 5 has Hybrid Electronic/Optical Image Stabilization built in, allowing you to capture videos with near-gimbal-stabilized quality even in low light scenarios. Sony’s Cinema Pro project-based video creation app is also included with the Xperia 5, making cinematic editing possible on a mobile phone. See the full press release along with pricing and availability after the jump....
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First Impressions: Sony E 70-350mm F4.5-6.3 G OSS (Sony E, APS-C)

Earlier this week, Sony announced their 70-350mm f4.5-6.3 G OSS lens alongside the A6100 and A6600 crop sensor mirrorless cameras and the 16-55mm f2.8 G lens. The Sony E 70-350mm f4.5-6.3 G OSS is the company’s first super-telephoto designed specifically for their crop sensor mirrorless cameras, with a 35mm Full Frame equivalent focal range of 105–525 mm. When shooting at such extreme focal lengths, the built-in optical image stabilization help keep motion blur down to a minimum. The 70-350mm f4.5-6.3 G OSS features an optical design consisting of an aspherical element along with three extra-low dispersion glass elements and is dust and moisture resistant. Sony managed to pack all of these features into a compact package that weighs in at just 625 g. We got a chance to shoot with the Sony 70-350mm f4.5-6.3 G OSS in a variety of shooting conditions using both the A6100 and A6600, head on after the jump to check out our first impressions on this super-telephoto....
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Could the New Razer Blade Stealth 13 Be a Photographer’s Next Laptop?

Today at IFA, Razer announced their updated 13″ ultrabook – the Razer Blade Stealth 13. Powered by Intel’s latest 10th generation Core i7-1065G7 Quad-Core processor, three variants of the Razer Blade Stealth 13 will be available. All three variants of the Razer Blade Stealth 13 are housed in precision-milled unibody aluminum chassis that are just 15.3 mm thick and weighing in at roughly 3 lbs depending on the configuration. Two of the models feature discrete NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 graphics, a first for a 13″ laptop. It sports a black anodized finish, while the third utilizes integrated Intel Iris Plus graphics and comes in a mercury white anodized finish. In terms of connectivity, all variants of the new Stealth 13 feature WiFi 6 and Bluetooth 5.0, and come equipped with a Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) port, a USB-C 3.1 Gen 2 port, as well as a pair of USB 3.1 Type-A ports. The updated Razer Blade Stealth 13 is a powerful mobile solution for photographers on the go. Additional details on the updated Razer Blade Stealth 13 variants can be found after the jump....
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First Impressions: Sony A6100 (Flagship Level AF, Entry Level Price Point)

In addition to launching the A6600 flagship earlier this week, Sony also introduced the entry-level A6100 as well, essentially a refresh of the highly popular A6000 which is now a five-year-old camera. The Sony A6100 shares the same 24.2 Megapixel APS-C Exmor CMOS sensor and blazing-fast 0.02 second 425 point Fast Hybrid AF system found in the higher end A6400 and A6600 models. With a MSRP of US $750 for the camera body alone, the A6100 is now the most affordable camera in Sony’s mirrorless lineup with Real-time Eye AF for both human and animal subjects as well as Real-time Tracking. To keep costs down, the A6100 utilizes a plastic housing that lacks weather-resistance as opposed to the more robust and weather-resistant magnesium alloy housing used in the flagship A6600. The A6100 also eschews the 5-axis in-camera image stabilization found in the flagship model. Additional cost-saving measures include the A6100 using a lower resolution OLED Electronic Viewfinder than the one found in higher-end Sony mirrorless APS-C cameras (1,440k-dot resolution in the A6100 versus a much higher 2,345k-dot resolution in the A6400/A6600) along with the continued use of the aging NP-FW50 battery as opposed to the newer and longer-lasting NP-FZ100 model that the A6600 is adopting, leading to significantly shorter runtimes. Shortcomings aside, the Sony A6100 is an interesting value proposition that shares much of the performance of the higher tier APS-C models, albeit at almost half the price of the A6600 flagship. We spent some time shooting with a pre-production A6100 unit during the launch event in New York City, you can read all about our first impressions after the jump....
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First Impressions: Sony E 16-55mm F2.8 G (Sony E Mount, APS-C)

Although Sony’s been releasing new mirrorless APS-C cameras regularly for the last few years, a common complaint has been the lack of new lenses that are designed specifically for crop sensor E mount cameras. With the introduction of the Sony E 16-55mm f2.8 G lens, photographers shooting with Sony APS-C mirrorless cameras finally have a new first-party standard zoom option available. The SEL1655G is Sony’s first 16-55mm zoom designed specifically for crop sensor E mount cameras, with a 35mm Full Frame equivalent focal length of 24-82.5mm and a constant aperture of f2.8. 24-70mm f2.8 zooms are the workhorse lenses for many working photographers, and this 16-55mm is essentially the APS-C version of that lens, albeit much lighter and more compact. The Sony E 16-55mm f2.8 G features an optical design consisting of two AA lens, two aspherical elements, and three ED glasses, and is driven by an XD Linear Motor allowing the lens to focus quickly, accurately, and quietly. Being a G lens, the 16-55mm is also dust and moisture resistant....
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First Impressions: Sony A6600 (Sony E Mount, APS-C)

Sony announced its latest APS-C flagship A6600 today at their New York headquarters. While the resolution remains at 24.2 Megapixels like the rest of the cameras in the A6xxx series, the A6600 features Sony’s latest-generation BIONZ X image processing engine which it claims to be 1.8x faster than the A6500, and can output 14-bit raw files. Like the A6500, the A6600 has 5-axis image stabilization built-in. The magnesium alloy body is also said to be dust and moisture resistant. It also sports the same flip-up rear LCD that was first introduced with the A6400. The most noticeable change with the A6600 is that it uses the larger and higher capacity NP-FZ100 Lithium-Ion batteries. This is a first for a Sony mirrorless APS-C body, which results in the camera having a larger and handgrip. We got to spend some time shooting with the new camera in a variety of different environments. Head on after the jump for our first impressions....
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