First Impressions: Lomography Lomo’Instant Square

In the past few years, I’ve learned to trust in Lomography’s ability to churn out solid instant film cameras, and the Lomography Lomo’Instant Square seems to be every bit as solid as lots of camera I’ve seen thus far. It’s the first camera to use the Fujifilm Instax Square format that isn’t made by Fujifilm. With a very classic design that is sort of an ode to old Kodak instant film cameras, this is one of Lomography’s more curious cameras. Lomo decided to go with a glass lens, a bellows system, and more or less the same sort of system the previous Lomo’Instant cameras have had. It borrows a lot from them and personally speaking, I’m pretty glad that I backed it. For ethical reasons of running a photography blog, I typically don’t like to back Kickstarter campaigns, but this is one that I firmly believed in.

Continue reading…

Review: Red River Palo Duro Etching Paper (Looks Like the Darkroom)

When most people look at prints, they often see them in one way: glossy and pretty high contrast–but Red River Palo Duro Etching paper is looking to turn that on its head. Red River Palo Duro Etching paper is a matte paper designed to print in a way that emulates what a photographer would get in the darkroom. And indeed, it is surely something that goes along very well with all the vintage Insta-looks and the presets that you’re bound to find in images. But at the same time, it could take folks some getting used to simply because of the fact that if you’re part of the newer generation of photographers, you probably have never seen what a true darkroom print looks like.

Continue reading…

Film Review: Lomography Earl Grey 100 Black and White (35mm and 120)

Years ago, Lomography introduced Lomography Earl Grey 100 black and white film and added yet another entry into a market looking for more 100 ISO black and white films. There are a few from Ilford, none from Kodak except for T-Max, one from Fujifilm and a few other manufacturers producing them. But slower ISO black and white films aren’t really spoken of except for Acros. Black and white ISO 100 films are great for studio and portraiture work but in many cases have the versatility to deliver great results when pushed.

Lomography’s Earl Grey 100 used to be an older emulsion of Kodak T-Max 100. But that’s changed over the years. It’s now a Fomapan emulsion. But in the end, who cares? All that matters is the results.

Continue reading…

Film Review: Lomography Color Negative 400 (35mm and 120)

Lomography Color Negative 400 is one of those alternative color films that unfortunately isn’t spoken about enough. And for some of us, that’s perfectly fine. I’m okay with all the haters of Lomography refusing to understand what the company is doing and saving more film for me. Walking into the West Village store in NYC to be greeted warmly by the employees and always having the ability to buy some simply makes me happier. And all the folks who only shoot digital and only care about shooting digital can keep doing so. They’ll never understand the awesome secret that the rest of us know that is ironically being published on one of the biggest indie photo blogs on the web.

That’s all just fine.

Continue reading…

Vintage Camera Review: Pentax 67 (67 Format)

The Pentax 67 has to be one of the most drooled over medium format SLR cameras ever made. For great reasons too! The Pentax 67 is a film SLR that is more or less designed to be portable and shot handheld by fashion photographers and portrait photographers. For many years it was well regarded and even today, there is some fantastic work that is often done with the camera. Between this, the Pentax 67 II and the Mamiya RB67/RZ67, lots of photographers really have a tough choice figuring out what they want.

The truth is that it really depends on your style and it also really depends on how good you are at being able to create photos.

Continue reading…

Review: MS Optics 28mm f2 Pancake Lens (Leica M Mount)

The MS Optics 28mm f2 Pancake lens offering is a lens that should be permanently glued to a Leica CL if you have one. Now, don’t go doing that for real now, but more to the point, this is a lens that really should be glued on. Why? It’s incredibly small. The MS Optics 28mm f2 is one of the smallest lens offerings for the Leica M mount, with perhaps only Lomography’s Minitar 32mm f2.8 lens rivaling it. In fact, both of those lenses have unique image qualities to them as well as drastically different price points. Their operation is quite similar though due to their being this small.

One thing is for absolutely certain: mate the MS Optics 28mm f2 to your Leica M mount (or any M mount camera) and the package will be that much lighter and smaller than nearly any other lens you use with your camera.

Continue reading…

The Lomography Lomo’Instant Square Shoots Fujifilm Instax Square with Its Glass Lens

Hey analog world, we’ve got some really cool new announcements in the form of the new Lomography Lomo’Instant Square camera. The first to the table was the Fujifilm Instax Square SQ10; which in my opinion is little more than just an Instax Square printer. But this new camera is putting the light directly onto the film plane and not a digital sensor of any sort–unlike the Fujifilm camera. Using a 95mm f10 lens, the Lomography Lomo’Instant Square has programmed automatic exposures with compensation being offered. Plus there is a bulb mode, flash, infrared shutter release built into the lens cap, a separate remote, and real glass in the lens. While a 95mm f10 lens may sound pretty slow, consider the fact that this is a 62mm x 62mm film plane–far larger than 35mm and 645. Plus, the viewfinder isn’t through the lens, instead it’s just more or less for framing.

Continue reading…