Why Are the Colors in My Photo Weird? A Beginner’s Guide

There are times when you look at a photo and wonder why the colors are weird. And if you’re a beginner, then you’ may be taking the photo again and again to fix the problem. This is typical of human nature: trying the same thing over and over again while hoping for different results. But the weird colors in your photos can be fixed fairly easily. And we’re going to tell you how.

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Chart: The Look of Film Photography Explained in Terms of White Balance

How many of you can tell the difference between daylight white balance and shade or Tungsten?

When you think of daylight white balance, we’re positive that many of you have a tough time figuring it out. You’re probably shooting in auto white balance. And if you had to take an educated guess, you’d think that it would be a warm-toned balance. Daylight is indeed warmer than Tungsten, at least in terms of white balance. And the way that it works is that the two try to cancel each other out. Tungsten lights are pretty warm, so the white balance has to be very cool. Daylight is very cool, so the white balance needs to be warm. However, folks like their images to be even warmer. If this is all sounding confusing to you, then please check out our infographic below.

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CineStill Cs6 Is Aiming to Replace Professional Labs for Slide Film

Quite literally, CineStill is claiming that you won’t need a professional photo lab with their new CineStill Cs6.

CineStill has a huge claim with its latest release today. CineStill is coming out with its new CineStill Cs6 Creative Slide 3-Bath Process. “There’s no longer a need for a darkroom, professional lab or high-tech equipment to create analog photographs,” states the press release. “You can now create beautiful color transparencies at home through one simple process.” In development for a few years, the kit and the other products being announced today could indeed change things for film photographers everywhere. Though we haven’t heard good things about some of their other chemicals, we’re pretty curious about the new Cs6.

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Review: Ars Imago Lab Box (For the New Film Shooter)

The Ars Imago Lab Box is how the new film photographer can get into the analog world much easier.

When the Lab Box arrived in the mail, I’ll admit to being apprehensive about the contents of the anonymous mailing box. Having backed many Kickstarter projects over the years, I was well aware that the products can run the gamut from barely cobbled together homebrew items to well-polished products ready for any store’s shelves. Often you’re unlikely to know which you’ve backed until the product arrives months (or sometimes years) later. However, my initial wariness was thankfully unfounded. The packaging was not only polished and professional but had the air of a higher-end item.

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SILBERSALZ35 is One of the Most Exciting Things to Happen to Analog Film in Some Time

When I made that title about SILBERSALZ35, I said it with all due intention and good faith.

To really explain what SILBERSALZ35 is, I should state that they’re a combination of CineStill, true cinema, and what a few other companies have been/tried before but ultimately failed. After meeting with them personally at Photokina 2018, I’m genuinely excited to talk about a company like theirs. If you’re excited about cinema and the look, feel, and texture of that gorgeous film grain that you see on the silver screen, then I’m positive that you’re going to share my adoration and excitement about SILBERSALZ35.

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The Phoblographer’s Guide to CineStill Film Emulsions

We’ve reviewed and tested every CineStill film emulsion in both 35mm and 120.

I like to think that CineStill had a fairly big part in the revival of analog film culture. Indeed they did something no one else was doing and even today no one else really does. Yet in many ways, what CineStill does is something that has been around for years. The company takes movie film stock, modifies it to be developed with standard film development processes, and cuts it for photographers. It has resulted in some film emulsions that are incredibly unique if not the most unique on the market. By and large, they’re one of my personal favorite film manufacturers. Over the years, I’ve reviewed all their film emulsions and am now providing a comprehensive guide to their film.

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Using Strobes to Enhance the Sun in Portraiture

Strobes are the best for so many reasons.

So many photographers out there rely heavily on natural light for their outdoor and indoor portraits, but many of you also make use of external lighting sources like strobes or speedlights. One great way to make use of both methods of thought is to use a strobe or speedlight as a fill light in your natural light portraits instead of something reflective, like a 5 in 1 reflector. Continue reading…

How to Get Film-like Warm Skin Tones With Daylight White Balance

One of the reasons I use specific white balances like Daylight when shooting photos is because it tends to take the guesswork out of editing and colors. Daylight white balance is balanced to be fairly warm and to counteract the already very cool light that daylight is. Though many times there are situations where you’d rather have warm skin tones in the scene. For the most part, what people tend to do is just work with the white balance to make the skin warmer but then in the process just make the whole scene warmer.

This happens a whole lot when working during the blue hour, in overcast weather etc.

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The Truth About How White Balance And Your Camera Actually Work

There is absolutely no reason why you shouldn’t care about white balance in the same way that you care about manual control over the exposure of the image. The way that color is rendered in a photo can completely change the way that it appears and in order to get the absolute best color, you should use manual control over your white balance in the same way that you manually control the ISO, aperture and shutter speeds. While manufacturers sit there and try in vain to get better high ISO results and more dynamic range, they’re not giving us what can possibly provide for even more creative freedom: better color control. The majority of cameras don’t provide incredibly accurate color control or gradation from their sensors. Film arguably does a better job of this in the right situations but digital cameras are capable of getting pretty darned close to real results.

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Felix Hernandez’s Ode to Back to the Future Will Give You Serious Nostalgia

All images by Felix Hernandez. Used with Creative Commons Permission

We’ve featured Felix Hernandez here a number of times for his awesome photo projects, and this time around he’s giving us an ode to Back to the Future. Felix has been creating small scale model photography for a while now as his own personal tribute to a lot of different movies and cool parts of popular geek culture. A lot of it has to do with cars while other parts have more to do with Star Wars or other movies. But for Back to the Future, he needed to capture all the neons, fire and the overall spirit of the incredibly popular 80s movie.

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Useful Photography Tip #178: How to Get the Blade Runner Look In Your Photos

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Click here.

Lots of photographers everywhere tend to want what’s called the “Blade Runner” look in their images, and what they don’t realize is just how incredibly simple it is to do within the camera and not even worry about post-production at all. And guess what: it has everything to just do with white balance and the lights around you. The scenes that we’re specifically talking about happen in the cities–which are bathed in Daylight colored lighting. If you’re unaware, a flash is balanced to daylight. When you look at the lights around you too, they’ll tend to be whiter in color and output. To clarify just a bit more, think about your phone’s white light color display and how it becomes warmer at night.

Back to daylight lighting: you’ll need to find a whole lot of that. Now there are two ways that you can proceed here. With your digital camera, manually set the kelvin temperature of your camera to 3200K. That’s the color of tungsten film properly and will give off the blueish look when you’re in the presence of daylight. Alternatively, load your camera up with CineStill 800T and go shooting. For the best results, shoot at ISO 800 when you’re around really bright lights. Otherwise, feed the film more light by overexposing by around a stop or so.

How Color Affects Leading Lines in Landscape Photography

On the Phoblographer, we tend to talk a whole lot about color, black and white, and how incredibly important it is to use them effectively in your photography. We typically apply them to portraiture, but it’s also not too terrible of an idea to apply it to landscape photography. You see, in landscape photography there are a few basic rules to creating better landscapes photos and for the most part they apply to creating better color images. But when it comes to making black and white or even just creating more striking color, there are a few other techniques you may not have tried yet.

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Opinion: Canon Gets Skin Tones Right Where Sony and Fujifilm Still Fail

I’m going to share with you a little bit of insight that the cinema industry has known for years but that the photo industry still sort of rejects in favor of innovation: and that’s that Canon has been getting skin tones perfectly, absolutely right for years and that they still do. I’m aware that this is going to incite a flame war amongst one base vs another but before you go any further you know should know something else. This is all my own opinion.

When I started the Phoblographer, I wanted this blog to always be transparent. When we are paid to say things, we clearly label it in order to abide by FTC laws and in order to avoid any sort of possible lawsuits. Just consider it: if you’re a business owner would you want something that you spent around 1/3rd of your life building? I’m sure you wouldn’t; and so I take that very specific and very careful designation. Long time readers have known this and in effect actually know that I’ll spend some time creating sponsored content that they enjoy if it helps me pay the server bill, rent, etc. Trolls, on the other hand, just tend to say something before they think.

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White vs Gold Reflectors: How They Work for Portrait Photography

If you’re a natural light portrait photographer, then I simply cannot express to you how much a reflector can help you create better portraits. They’re so incredibly versatile–being able to reflect light of certain colors into a scene or even diffuse light as you see it coming into the scene. So YouTube channel Weekly Imogen decided to put together a video to show you just how reflectors work; but not just any reflectors.

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How Daylight White Balance Can Make You a Better Photographer

For the past year or so, I’ve been doing a special experiment with the way I shoot photos: I’ve been working almost exclusively with daylight white balance. Crazy, right? Especially when these days the auto white balance setting seems to do such a great job. Plus, when you consider how easy post-production is these days, it almost makes no sense. But indeed it does. Shooting a bit more restrained lets you think in a different way.

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Beginner’s Tips: Getting the Most out of Golden Hour Landscape Photography

When you’re shooting during the Golden Hour, you’ll probably see that one of the more challenging things to do is golden hour landscape photography. But, it isn’t that difficult if you just understand how light works. Modern DSLRs and mirrorless cameras are highly capable, and with a bit of know-how you can get an image that will look fantastic straight out of camera. While it’s true that most of the magic in landscape photography happens during the processing stage, here’s what you can do to get the most of the situation and process your photos less.

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Useful Photography Tip #174: How to Make a Scene Shot During the Day Look Like Night

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Click here.

I’m going to let you in on some knowledge that cinematographers have known for years, but that photographers have greatly underutilized for a while–and it has to do with a simple white balance trick. The situation: let’s say you’re shooting a scene during the day or maybe sometime at dusk but you’re trying to make it look like a scene shot at night. Sometimes that’s very tough to do and at other times you simply just don’t have the time to go shooting at night.

This is a longer Useful Photography Tip, so I implore you to hit the jump for more.

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How to Shoot Golden Hour Portraits That Require Less Editing

Spring is here; it’s a time for golden hour portraits and photographers to get excited about chasing the light in the creation of the killer photo. Many photographers love shooting during the Golden Hour especially due to its ability to deliver soft, golden light and to make a person’s skin tones look fantastic. When it comes to photographing people in traditional portrait settings, there’s something much more appealing about warmer lighting situations than cooler lighting. While cooler lighting surely has its place, warmer lighting is often more flattering.

So if you want to go out there and create better golden hour photos, here’s how to do it while also spending less time in Lightroom or Capture One.

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Tougher Than You Think: How to Shoot in a Studio Style With Film

Shooting in a studio or studio style with film changes a lot more of the photography game than you’d think. You see, there’s no taking a photo, chimping, and saying you like the image or not. You have to get it right the first time around. There’s also a major difference in what can be done with color correction and a lot more. But the biggest thing is the fact that you and your subject will have a much greater sense of connection due to how you need to communicate a whole lot more.

In this post, we’re going to focus a bit more on the technical details.

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DIY Hack: Pop Photo Puts a Candle Jar on a Flash; Gets Experimental Results

Ever heard of a Gobo? Strobist photographers have been using them for years and years–essentially a GoBo is a go-between that modifies the light output to shape it and define it in a certain way. An umbrella and a softbox are gobos: but so could a piece of plastic or a strange glass. In fact, the utterly bored yet imaginative folks over at Pop Photo tried to do just that. But in a new series that they’re starting called “Random object lighting modifier challenge” they decided to slap a glass candle holder on the business end of a flash.

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