12 Cameras with IBIS That Will Give You Superpowers

These cameras with IBIS allow you to get shots that should be impossible.

IBIS has quickly become a must-have for many photographers. A feature that used to be reserved for only high-end cameras can now be found in cameras of all price points. Cameras with IBIS allow you to create images that would otherwise be impossible to get. Image stabilization works so well that you’ll feel like you have superpowers. Cameras with IBIS can really open up new doors for many, and they’ll allow you to be more creative with your shots. These cameras with IBIS will also make shooting in low light conditions easier. If you have been looking for cameras with IBIS, these 12 should definitely be on your radar.

If you’re in the market for cameras with IBIS, you’re in luck: the market has been flooded with options. You can get cameras with IBIS starting at under $1,000 now, which is crazy! So why would you need IBIS? There are a few reasons you might consider cameras with IBIS.

A handheld 6 second exposure made with the Canon EOS R6 and the RF 15-35mm F2.8L IS USM.

You’ll able to handhold your camera longer at slower shutter speeds. You can use tele and super-telephoto lenses that can be tricky to handhold. You can even shoot in low light conditions at slower shutter speeds and lower ISOs. If you create videos, cameras with IBIS will enable you to shoot without the need for a dedicated gimble. IBIS also brings about neat features like pixel-shift technology, which allows the taking of super-high-resolution images. You can even use non-stabilized lenses and still benefit from IBIS. If you have naturally shaky hands or like to indulge in caffeine-laced beverages, cameras with IBIS will be a game-changer for you. Check out a few of our favorite cameras with IBIS below.

Canon EOS R5

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Well built
  • Excellent battery life
  • So intuitive for a Canon shooter
  • Feels very good in the hand
  • Image stabilization is pretty much second to none
  • Wonderful menu systems
  • Excellent details
  • Weather sealed
  • Reliable
  • Canon’s Mobile App connection setup is as simple as ever
  • Doesn’t overheat with short clips
  • Wifi sending of full HD video is pretty fast
  • High ISO RAW files hold a fair amount of data. There’s great dynamic range and colors, but the noise is a bit painful.

Cons

  • The joystick is in an odd spot
  • In some ways feels like an old 60D, but it’s totally not
  • I personally feel the magnification button is in an odd spot
  • Can’t transfer 8K video via Wifi
  • 4K movie clips shorter than 30 seconds take a while to send, and then ultimately don’t end up on your phone
  • High ISO Raw files above 12,800 tend to get a bit messy
  • The price is a bit high at $3,899

Buy now: $3,899

Nikon Z6

Camera Deals

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Comfortable handgrip
  • Excellent Electronic Viewfinder with 100% frame coverage
  • EVF protrudes from the camera body, minimizing contact between your nose and the rear LCD
  • The top display shows you all of your settings at a glance
  • Intuitive touchscreen rear LCD
  • Solid battery life when using newly designed EN-EL15b batteries
  • Robust weather sealing
  • Works with most existing Nikon F mount lenses using the Nikon FTZ adapter

Cons

  • A single XQD card slot may be a deal-breaker
  • Colors on the rear LCD were inconsistent when compared to EVF
  • Autofocus performance, while better than the Nikon Z7, still leaves much to be desired
  • Certain settings were oddly organized within the menus
  • There is way too much settings information displayed on the rear LCD, often getting in the way of you framing your shot

Buy now: $1,796.95

Olympus OMD EM5 Mark III

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Beautiful retro styling
  • Excellent image quality
  • Robust weather sealing
  • Reliable image stabilization
  • Accurate autofocus
  • Compact form factor
  • Built-in Live Composite and 50 MP High Resolution shooting modes are highly effective

Cons

  • Form factor can be too compact for some
  • Plasticky build quality
  • Single UHS-II SD Card slot
  • Lacks dedicated joystick
  • Poor battery life
  • Convoluted menu systems
  • No major innovations after over four years

Buy now: $999

Sony a6600

hybrid shooters camera - Sony a6600

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Feels better than all other APS-C Sony cameras
  • It’s a mini a9
  • The bigger battery is a very welcome addition
  • Weather sealing is nice
  • Image stabilization
  • The combined weather sealing and bigger battery mean you can go all day on a single charge
  • Lightweight and small-sized camera
  • The quiet shutter in addition to the silent option
  • A lot of buttons that help you get around some of the issues
  • Fast-focusing even on the streets with continually changing light
  • There is almost no reason to take it off of wide tracking and continuous autofocus
  • Face detection for animals is very fun
  • Low ISO detail retention in highlights and shadows is pretty good.

Cons

  • No lock on the mode dial
  • Sony refuses to give us three direct control dials
  • Sony refuses to put a joystick on the back
  • No Dual Card Slots
  • Face detection doesn’t seem as advanced as the a7 and a9 series
  • Sony still limits a photographer from having full use of the touchscreen in a way similar to Canon and Panasonic
  • The screen is sort of low resolution compared to the full-frame cameras
  • It needs a viewfinder that flips up
  • Focus peaking on the APS C bodies used to be amazing, and now not so much
  • Detail loss above ISO 3200
  • Why no USB C charging or port?

Buy now: $1,398

perfect camera
Captured with the Pentax K1 II

Pro Tip: The great thing with IBIS is it allows you to handhold the camera at low shutter speeds while still capturing razor-sharp images. Some cameras with IBIS include pixel-shift technology. This tech gives the ability to capture images that exceed the megapixel size of your sensor. This mode works by combining multiple shots taken as the sensor shifts. For example, the Pentax K1 II can create images with the equivalent output of over 100 megapixels from a 36.3-megapixel sensor. But, you’re going to need a tripod to get the most out of these modes. If you don’t own a sturdy tripod, head to our reviews section to check out tripods there.

Pentax K1 Mk II

Cameras with IBIS

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Enough weather sealing to last a lifetime
  • Rock-solid build quality
  • Easy to read LCD Screen
  • In-Body Image Stabilization / Pixel Shift
  • Gorgeous 100% coverage viewfinder
  • Excellent image quality
  • Dual SD Card slots
  • Great battery life
  • That little light above the lens mount

Cons

  • Only 33 focus points
  • Autofocus system won’t win any races
  • Extremely heavy
  • No touchscreen

Buy now: $1,796,95

Canon EOS R6

Cameras with IBIS

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Fantastic ergonomics have returned to Canon cameras
  • Great build quality which includes excellent weather sealing
  • Incredible autofocus system that’s on par with Sony offerings
  • Plenty of 4K video options for those need them
  • Easy to use touchscreen menu system
  • Excellent image quality
  • Incredibly effective IBIS
  • Two UHS-II SD card slots
  • Incredible buffer performance (over 180 RAW and over 1,300 JPEGS)
  • The EVF and vari-angle LCD are of high quality

Cons

  • No top LCD panel

Buy now: $2,499

Sony A7R IV

Cameras with IBIS

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Improved ergonomics
  • Blazing fast autofocus
  • Excellent weather sealing
  • Anti-flicker shooting
  • Dual UHS-II SD card slots
  • More resolution than most photographers will need

Cons

  • Limited touchscreen functionality: You still can’t navigate the menus or interact with the display
  • Large file sizes (to be expected)

Buy now: $3,198

Panasonic S1

Cameras with IBIS

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Weather sealing is great
  • Very reliable, but not when it comes to autofocus
  • Decent image quality
  • Very versatile RAW files, but not as much as the S1R
  • Cleaner high ISO output than the S1R, but not by much when editing
  • Nearly up there with Canon for having the easiest menu system to use and navigate
  • Animal tracking AF works surprisingly well. It’s almost on the level of Canon and Sony.
  • Incredibly clean ISO 6400
  • When it nails focus, it’s surprisingly good at tracking. But Panasonic needs to be better.
  • When it hits and tracks, it’s on par with Fujifilm and Canon’s offerings.

Cons

  • The autofocus isn’t that awesome even after the latest update
  • Really big
  • Autofocus isn’t nearly that of a modern camera
  • Low light AF is outdone by pretty much every other brand

Buy now: $2,497.99

Cameras with IBIS
Handheld 1.6 second exposure with the Canon EOS R6

Pro Tip: Being able to pull off incredibly long exposures while hand-holding a camera is a great feeling, It’s almost like you have superpowers. Still, you need to know how to frame your shots so they look great. If you want to learn how to capture long exposures that will wow anyone who looks at them, check out this incredibly affordable long exposure photography course. You’ll be able to put your new camera and it’s great tech to work in no time.

Fujifilm X-T4

Cameras with IBIS

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Excellent build quality and weather sealing
  • Upgraded autofocus performance
  • Articulating touchscreen, finally!
  • Dual UHS-II SD card slots
  • Some of the best in-camera image stabilization we’ve seen
  • Deeper grip
  • New Bleach Bypass film simulation
  • Larger battery (can be tripled when using the VG-XT4 vertical grip)
  • A lot of technology for $1,699

Cons

  • Some of the menus in the Fujifilm XT4 still aren’t touch compatible
  • Inconsistent high ISO performance

Buy now: $1,699

Olympus OMD E-M1 Mk III

Cameras with IBIS

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Feels nice when shooting for a long time
  • We like the shutter sound
  • Good continuous autofocus which does tracking
  • The processor is fantastic
  • The art filters continue to make Olympus unique amongst other camera brands
  • Live composite is so incredibly pleasant, along with Starry AF
  • It survived sand and saltwater
  • Continuous AF+Tracking works well with wide angles
  • The custom shooting mode switch on the back is something every adventure brand should have
  • This is the foundation for an Olympus camera we’d want to bring with us everywhere
  • Handheld high res shot continues to be one of the best things ever

Cons

  • Battery life in the heat and the cold
  • Still no rating system in the playback menu. Why?
  • C-AF + Tracking is useless with telephoto lenses
  • Why no touchscreen menus?
  • Olympus’s menu system continues to give headaches
  • Some of the parts seem very dated. Like the EVF, the sensor, and some of the dials
  • A top screen LCD could have made shooting easier
  • Why couldn’t it have Dual UHS-II Card slots
  • Above ISO 1600, you really need the art filters to take the most advantage of the otherwise too grainy sensor
  • Could really use no blackout in the EVF
  • Animal Tracking in autofocus is needed

Buy now: $1,699

Sony a7 III

Cameras with IBIS

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • The best battery life of any Sony or mirrorless camera we’ve ever tested
  • A fair amount of resolution and versatility in the RAW files that can be realized with Capture One
  • Nice feel to it
  • Consistency with all the other cameras in terms of the menu system
  • Autofocus can acquire a target in near darkness
  • It essentially feels like a scaled-down Sony a9 and Sony a7r III
  • Not a bad price point

Cons

  • Mount and certain lenses may allow for dust to get in onto the sensor. It isn’t as tight as the a7r III’s

Buy now: $1,998

Fujifilm GFX 100

Cameras with IBIS

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • 102 amazing Megapixels
  • Under $10,000 for one of the most powerful Medium Format cameras on the market
  • It uses the same autofocus system as the X-T3
  • Fantastic IBIS
  • A gorgeous electronic viewfinder
  • The menu system is perhaps only second to Canon’s in terms of design
  • The image quality is simply jaw-dropping
  • Fantastic high ISO capabilities
  • Very good battery life
  • The top and rear LCD and OLED panels are easy to see and read in bright conditions

Cons

  • Quite possibly the worst ergonomics of any camera
  • The thumb rest on the back is poorly designed
  • The body of the Fujifilm GFX 100 feels incredibly cheap
  • The buttons are mushy and have hardly any tactile feel
  • AF tracking was hit or miss, as was the eye AF
  • The touchscreen cannot be used to navigate the menu system
  • The grip is too shallow and does not provide a comfortable way to hold this 3lb camera
  • The vertical grip is untextured and incredibly slippery

Buy now: $9,999