Film Photography Project Introduces New Line of Hand-Rolled Films

Film Photography Project’s new line of hand-rolled 35mm films are for black and white lovers.

In a fitting gesture of love for film photography, the Film Photography Project has launched a new line of hand-rolled 35mm black and white films. Learning that there are more rare emulsions for us to try is just the stuff film lovers and ardent monochrome fans needed on this occasion.

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Review: Lomography Simple Use Cameras

The Lomography Simple Use Cameras can easily be mistaken for disposable cameras, but they’re in fact not. Confused? Yeah, I was too the first time that I saw the press release, as when I looked at the cameras themselves, they straight up just looked like disposables. Then I did more digging. Lomography calls them the Simple Use cameras. They’re designed to look and function like disposable cameras but have some extra additions–like the ability to be reloaded and in some cases gels that go right over the flashes. They also cost a bit more than the standard disposable camera out there, but when you consider the fact they’re reloadable and in some cases they come with gels for the flash, then you’re not at all getting a bad deal.

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Simulating the Look of Ilford FP4 Black and White Film with Your Sony Camera

When you consider the history of Ilford film, Delta probably gets the most love despite another film like Ilford FP4 being highly capable and perhaps even better at delivering a look that so many modern digital photographers try to emulate. Through lots of experimentation though, I’ve been able to find a way to mimic the look of the film with a Sony a7 or Sony a7r II. It’s a fact, if there is one thing beyond battery life that photographers complain about with Sony cameras then it’s sometimes the colors. The camera company has been known to deliver incredibly saturated (sometimes a bit too much) colors in their images. This partially comes from the lenses that they work with. To get the best absolute best colors that you really want, I suggest leaving Lightroom for Capture One 10. But if you’d just like some great images which you’ll be fine with when it comes to the JPEGs then consider this short tutorial.

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ISO 400: Amanda Rivkin Talks About Photojournalism Internationally

President Elect Barack Obama waves to a crowd of 250,000 through bullet proof glass after becoming the 44th U.S. President on election night in Grant Park in Chicago, Illinois on November 4, 2008.

President Elect Barack Obama waves to a crowd of 250,000 through bullet proof glass after becoming the 44th U.S. President on election night in Grant Park in Chicago, Illinois on November 4, 2008. Photo by Amanda Rivkin

All photographs are copyrighted and used with permission by Amanda Rivkin.

In this episode of ISO 400, we hear from Amanda Rivkin, an American photojournalist currently based in Chicago who has a wealth of international experience, having worked in places like Azerbaijan, Serbia, the Czech Republic, Poland and Turkey. She’s been published in a wide variety of publications, including The New York Times, Le Monde and Newsweek among others. She has a deep understanding of storytelling and an eye for subtlety that you don’t often find in news photographs.

If you’d like to see Amanda’s work, you can check out her website and follow her on Instagram @amandarivkin and on Facebook.

As always, our music is provided by Yuki Futami, a New York-based jazz musician.

The episode is embedded below.

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ISO 400: Lauren Welles On Leaving Law for Photography

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All images are copyright Lauren Welles, and are being used with permission.

In this episode of ISO 400, we hear from Lauren Welles, a New York-based photographer. She left a 16-year-career in corporate law for photography about six years ago. The change was necessary, one that revived her. We spoke with Welles last year about her Coney Island series of photographs that was featured on The Fence at Photoville. She’s got an eye for street photography that she’s been developing since she started. In this episode, she tells us about the perils and benefits of leaving a comfortable job, realizing her own photographic identity and more.

The episode and a selection of her work are available after the break. You can see more of her work on her websiteon Facebook, and on Instagram @laurenwelles.

As always, our music is provided by Yuki Futami, a New York-based jazz musician.

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ISO 400: Marcus Yam Talks About Covering Natural Disasters

Protesters march after the Grand Jury announced their decision to not charge Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the case of Michael Brown's shooting, in Los Angeles, CA on, Nov. 25, 2014.  (Photo by Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times)

Protesters march after the Grand Jury announced their decision to not charge Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the case of Michael Brown’s shooting, in Los Angeles, CA on, Nov. 25, 2014. (Photo by Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times) ©Los Angeles Times

All images are copyrighted Marcus Yam unless otherwise indicated and are being used with permission.

In this episode of ISO 400, we hear from Marcus Yam, a Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist who’s worked for the NY Times, Seattle Times, and the LA Times. He was a part of the team at that covered the devastating Oso landslide for the Seattle Times, which earned the publication a Pulitzer Prize. As an intern for the NY Times, he told the story of Sergeant First Class Eich who had to leave his two young boys behind to go to war. The story became a multimedia package called “The Home Front,” which earned Yam several awards.

In this episode, he talks about freelance life, what it was like to leave aerospace engineering, the benefits of working for a publication full-time, and more.

His work can be found on his website, and you can follow him on Instagram @yamphoto. The episode and a selection of his photographs are below.

As always, our music is provided by Yuki Futami, a NY-based jazz musician.

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ISO 400: Thomas Hurst Talks About Being an Inventor

A grandfather and his granddaughter share smiles inside a high-school gym turned refugee center on the Albania boarder with Kosovo. ©Thomas James Hurst - 1999

A grandfather and his granddaughter share smiles inside a high-school gym turned refugee center on the Albania boarder with Kosovo. ©Thomas James Hurst – 1999 (World Press Photo – 2ooo)

All images are copyrighted Thomas James Hurst, and are being used with permission.

In this episode of ISO 400, we hear from Thomas Hurst a 20-year photojournalist turned inventor. Spurred by an interest to see what war was like, he grabbed a camera, invented press credentials and flew to Bosnia in 1992. From there, he went on to work in some of the biggest conflict zones of the 1990s and 2000s. After nearly 20 years, he left photojournalism to become a pastor, which he eventually left to focus on COVR Photo, an iPhone case with a built-in prism that he invented.

In this episode, he talks about the early years of his photojournalism, what it’s like to learn the craft on the job, becoming an inventor, and more. A selection of his work, as well as the episode is after the break. If you’d like to see more of Hurst’s work, check out his website. If you’re curious about the COVR photo, check out our review, and he currently has a Kickstarter for the iPhone 6 version.

As always, our music is provided by Yuki Futami, a New York-based jazz musician.

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The Phoblographer’s Favorite Photography Podcasts

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Podcasts are a great way to kill time or to listen to while working or doing daily chores. Luckily, there are lots of great podcasts out there for photographers that can keep you up to date on the latest happenings in the world and how major news is affected by photography. With that said, we should totally tell you all about our own: ISO 400. But here are some of our very favorite photography podcasts.

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ISO 400 – Rinzi Ruiz Talks About Finding the Light

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In this episode of ISO 400, we hear from Rinzi Ruiz, a street and wedding photographer based in Los Angeles. Towards the of 2011, Ruiz was laid off a job he had for 10 years, and this gave him time to focus on his photography. He found his zen in street photography on the streets of Los Angeles. His high contrast monochrome images are deeply meditative, and they have excellent lighting.

He became known for a blog called Street Zen, in which he posts images he makes on the street. More of his work can be found on his website and his Instagram.

A selection of his work and the episode can be seen after the break.

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ISO 400 – Robert Larson Talks About Long Term Projects

From "The Summer of Our Lives"

From “The Summer of Our Lives”

All images are copyrighted Robert Larson and are used with permission.

After a brief hiatus, ISO 400 is back. This week, we hear from Robert Larson, a documentary photographer based in Los Angeles. Larson got his start in photography in 2007 at a small town newspaper. It was the death of his grandfather in 2009 that marked a turn in his photography from the single image to the photo story.

He made the transition to long-term projects, one of which is called “Waiting for Haiti.” Larson has always been interested in the country, and after the earthquake happened in 2010, he knew he had to go there to make pictures. Over the course of three trips, he’s forged deep friendships and made powerful images, though the project isn’t over.

Larson also had the pleasure of photographing his own wedding. That’s technically a bit misleading. He was working on a project about his wife-to-be, and the natural conclusion to that was a set of photographs from his perspective on their big day. He trusted his friend Rinzi Ruiz, who we’ll be hearing from in a future episode, to photograph the entire thing.

To see more of Robert’s work, head on over to his website or check him out on Instagram.

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ISO 400: Gareth Pon Talks About Community Building Through Instagram

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In this episode of ISO 400, we hear from Gareth Pon, a South African filmmaker and photographer. Pon came to photography several years ago when he downloaded Instagram on a whim. Before Instagram, he never seriously took pictures, but the community he witnessed there gave him both wanderlust and the photo bug. The more he photographed, the more popular he became, and now, he has one of the largest followings on Instagram out of South Africa.

With such a large following, he founded the Instagramers South Africa community two years ago, where he has met and worked with other photographers in his home country. Pon has attracted an international audience, and as a result, he’s traveled extensively to meet other photographers, take pictures and teach  workshops. He’s an avid mobile photographer, though he uses a mix of cameras.

For more of Gareth’s work, check out his Instagram and his website.

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ISO 400: Eric Kim Talks About Street Photography

julius motal the phoblographer street photographers getting over fear eric kim image 05 Suits-8

In this episode of ISO 400, we talk with Eric Kim. While he may need no introduction for some, he is an international street photographer and educator. He’s known for the Eric Kim Street Photography Blog, which has been a tremendous resource for anyone looking to get their start in street photography. Kim started the blog when he realized that there were hardly any resources for street photography.

The blog has been somewhat of a journey for him. As he learns things about the craft, he turns them into blog posts. He interviews and features the work of other photographers, and he teaches workshops all over the world.

Here, he tells us more about what got him into the craft, what it means to be a street photographers, thoughts on his own work, and much more.

For more of Eric’s work, head on over to his website, check out his Facebook page, and visit the blog. Some examples of his work are down below.

As always, our music is provided by Yuki Futami, a New York-based jazz musician.

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ISO 400 – Ep. 003 – Mark Hemmings

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All images used with permission by Mark Hemmings.

In this episode of ISO 400, we hear from Mark Hemmings, a travel and commercial photographer based out of St. John, Canada. A trip to Japan in 2000 proved to be a turning point for Hemmings as it caused him to realize that he wanted to be a photographer. With an old camera and several rolls of slide film, he photographed landscapes in Nagano, and before long, he transitioned to other genres of photography.

With his brother Greg, he opened up Hemmings House, a production company based out of St. John, where he serves as the Director of Photography. When he isn’t photographing commercially, he can be found somewhere around the world teaching workshops. He’s an avid mobile shooter, too, as he frequently practices street photography with his iPhone.

We previously interviewed Hemmings early last year. For his portfolio, check out his website. For his street work, see his Facebook, and for his iPhone pics, see his Instagram.

At one point in the episode, Hemmings speaks about the importance of Gertrude Käsebier’s Silhouette of a Woman/A Maiden at Prayer, a historical photograph which you can find here.

As always, our music is provided by Yuki Futami, a New York-based jazz pianist.

Sit back and enjoy this episode of ISO 400.

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ISO 400 Episode #002: Mike Lerner

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All photographers are used with permission by Mike Lerner.

In this episode of ISO 400, we hear from Mike Lerner, a poker-player-turned-photographer who got his start in concert photography. In 2007, he photographed a then-unknown Katy Perry, and steadily networked and photographed his way up the ladder. He eventually landed a gig as Justin Bieber’s tour photographer, traveling on-and-off with him over the course of three years. Despite his successes in concert photography, he has left the genre for lifestyle photography, and has since attracted some big name clients.

Here, he shares his reasons for leaving concert photography, his insights on that business, and the projects he’s working on now. Below are some examples of his work (slight NSFW warning: there’s an underwear shot below).

Editor’s note: There were some questions about the first episode regarding whether or not ISO 400 is actually a podcast. It will be. We’re presently working on getting this on iTunes. For now, we’re releasing episodes on YouTube.

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Welcome to ISO 400, a Podcast by The Phoblographer

ISO-400-Podcast-Logo

Here at the Phoblographer, we’ve been working on diversifying our content both to reach new audiences and offer something more to our readers. For the past couple of months, we’ve been hard at work crafting our latest venture, a photography podcast called ISO 400.

On this site, you’ll find plenty of interviews with photographers, most of which were conducted over email. While that’s a great way to connect with someone, it often suffers from a lack of the back-and-forth that can really make an interview great, so we thought we’d interview photographers live over Skype. In order to be flexible, we’re offering both audio and video versions of each episode.

We are traditionally a gear-focused blog with our reviews and other features, but with ISO 400, we’re looking to break our own mold by focusing heavily on the art, craft and story of each photographer. Any mention of gear only serves to help our readers, and now our listeners, better understand how each photographer makes the images they’re known for.

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The Digital Bolex’s Low Light Abilities in This Video Are Jaw Dropping

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No Film School is reporting on some recently found Digital Bolex camera footage that is apparently showing off just how useful the camera can be in low light situations. But while that already sounds pretty cool, we need to mention a couple of quick facts first that will make this blow your mind even more.

First off, the Digital Bolex has a smaller sensor than some Super35mm sensor video camcorders. Second, it shoots RAW video. Third, the ISO range maxes out at ISO 400–meaning that you’re really not supposed to use this thing in really low light. But the video footage shown after the jump will show off just how much detail can be pulled from the video images.

Now to put things even more into perspective, lots of the video is shot in a subway. In NYC’s subways, ISO 400 will give me a 1/30th f1.4 exposure. That’s pretty slow. But the details pulled from the RAW images are mind blowing.

Our words won’t do justice to the footage shown right after the jump.

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