Review: Red River Palo Duro Etching Paper (Looks Like the Darkroom)

When most people look at prints, they often see them in one way: glossy and pretty high contrast–but Red River Palo Duro Etching paper is looking to turn that on its head. Red River Palo Duro Etching paper is a matte paper designed to print in a way that emulates what a photographer would get in the darkroom. And indeed, it is surely something that goes along very well with all the vintage Insta-looks and the presets that you’re bound to find in images. But at the same time, it could take folks some getting used to simply because of the fact that if you’re part of the newer generation of photographers, you probably have never seen what a true darkroom print looks like.

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The Top 6 Professional Printers for Photographers With Not a Lot of Space

What’s old is new, and similarly to how film photography has started to become more popular again among photography enthusiasts, the idea of printing photographs is a thing finding new life with the younger generation of photographers. This means that as a photographer you will need to consider the choice between printing on your own and sending out to a lab – the latter of which is obviously the more common approach these days.

That said, there is a really good case to be made these days for taking on the printing of your images on your own – the ability to really fine tune your prints to look perfect and choosing your own paper to name a few. But should you decide that printing your images in-house is something you want to consider, what printers should you be looking at?

We aren’t talking about multi-purpose fax/scanner/copier printers here, and the semi-professional and professional level printer industry, despite shrinking, has come a long way. So in this post we will be sharing with you our top picks for those of you looking into high quality photo printing at your home or business. Continue reading…

Review: Epson SureColor P800 Printer

For quite a while now, I’ve been sold on Canon’s Prograf 1000 printer; but then I finally had the chance to play with Epson’s P800. I previously reviewed the Epson P600, which I felt did a pretty good job overall. But then I tried the Prograf, and found that it delivered images that perfectly matched my computer screen. Seriously, how do you beat that?

So if Epson is going to do that, it would need to find a way to do the exact same thing and find a way to make the user experience easier.

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Review: Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 Printer

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon Prograf 1000 product photos (1 of 7)ISO 8001-60 sec at f - 2.0

There are lots of photographers out there that believe that an image isn’t really fully through the editing process until it’s printed–and many of those photographers are a part of who the Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 printer is targeted towards. This mentality differs based on a number of factors: age and the types of photographers are two of the main variables. But one thing remains constant: they want absolutely phenomenal printer quality.

Like the photographers who buy L lenses just to say that they have L lenses, this printer has a red marking on it and a mass appeal both to the working professional that isn’t doing super large prints (or has a need to) and the high end enthusiast that spends night and day over minute details in a meticulous manner. It’s a high end printer, but it’s not designed for the creme-de-la-creme of photographers who will only do large format paper/prints.

If you’re a photographer looking to get your work into a gallery or looking to offer your customers something really worthy of hanging up, then this is the one for you–if you can stomach a $1,299.99 price point.

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Review: Epson Surecolor P600 Printer

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Epson P600 printer review (1 of 8)ISO 4001-80 sec at f - 1.8

Though we (the millennial generation) don’t seem to care about the print that much, I can tell you from experience that seeing one in person creates magic in a person’s eyes. I’m not just talking about a print from a printer–although you should note before going on that this is fully a review of the Epson Surecolor P600 printer, but you should understand the background here.

Shoot an instant photo and someone will become mesmerized. Then hand it to them and they’ll be awestruck though may not necessarily know what to do with it. And that’s where I’m guilty.

Admittedly, this printer review took significantly longer for me to do than any other unit that I’ve reviewed. Why? It’s very easy for people like my and my generation to get caught up with the digital universe and stop being curious about the tangible things. It’s not that readers here don’t care about printers, we’ve found that you genuinely do in our experiments with the site. But instead, it has to do with the setup, finding space in a small NYC apartment, and getting it going. And like many people, we’re all afraid or put off by that very first initial step.

We barely print anymore: go get tickets to a concert and someone can scan your phone’s screen. But the Epson Surecolor P600 isn’t about that kind of print. It’s about art–and art is what keep that magic held in our eyes every time ink goes onto canvas and matte paper. And for a price point significantly lower than some cameras and lenses, you can’t go wrong.

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Review: Canon PIXMA iP2820 Printer

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon PIXMA iP2850 printer review product photos (1 of 10)ISO 4001-40 sec at f - 4.0

For the photographer on a budget of around $40, what would you expect from a printer? Considering that it costs less than some bottles of liquor, you really can’t expect it to do a whole lot except for printing. That’s pretty much the idea behind the Canon PIXMA iP2820 printer. Depending on what establishment you go to, it can cost you more money to get a print made than to do it yourself in the convenience of your own home and with very little work on your part with the exception of calibration.

While in 2014 we’d personally want more from a printer like this, you have to consider that there are even camera straps made and sold more expensive than the iP2820.

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Review: DNP DS40 Dye Sublimation Printer

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer DNP DS40 printer review images (1 of 10)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 2.8

Dye-Sublimation printing isn’t new, but it surely is a process that hasn’t been spoken about for a while or as much as laserjet and ink jet printing. However, DNP is a company that makes Dye-Sublimation printers–and if you aren’t familiar with the process then head right on over to your local WalMart or CVS. Most of America and the world is indeed happy with the results that they get.

So when the company pitched the DNP DS40 at us, we were naturally curious. Wedding clients have always been happy with prints from CVS or other places, so how would it work in a natural home/office setting?

Over the past three months we’ve been playing with the DNP DS40 and we can only describe this as addicting.

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Review: Epson XP-950

julius motal epson xp 950 product shot-1

There’s nothing quite like seeing your photographs on paper. The first few years of my photography were in film, and I used to get prints alongside a digital copy on a CD. I soon learned, however, that I invariably wanted to edit the photos upon receiving them, so rather than get prints and a CD, I just went for the CD to save some money and some trees. With my switch digital, I almost never printed. When the opportunity to review the Epson XP-950 arrived, I jumped at the chance because lately, I’ve wanted to get into printing because my photographs needed a home other than the screen. The XP-950 proved to be a viable conduit.

As a printer, scanner, and copier all in one it features Wifi connectivity and a scan resolution of 4800 DPI. Let’s take a look.

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