This Cool, Analog Dystopian World Gets Even Trippier With Blue and Cyan 3D Glasses

All images by Andrew Willis. Used with permission.

“My Honours project was a 6 minute experimental animation, but all the resources were captured on an assortment of film stocks and formats and much of the process was very experimental,” explains photographer Andrew Willis to us. We’ve featured his work on this website before as he’s got some fantastic Bleached Polaroids and this time around he went a lot darker. “The final result is a dark, dystopian landscape populated by weirdos and shady characters. It was more of an exercise in character and world building than trying to build some clear narrative driven plot.” Andrew explains that while the final destination for the work was always to be a short animated film, he shot all of the elements with the hope that the individual images would be strong enough to stand by themselves.

Andrew’s project is far different than anything else out there. He’s taken to embracing those old 3D red and cyan glasses you’d get with Disney Adventure magazine back in the 90s.

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Film Review: Lomography Earl Grey 100 Black and White (35mm and 120)

Years ago, Lomography introduced Lomography Earl Grey 100 black and white film and added yet another entry into a market looking for more 100 ISO black and white films. There are a few from Ilford, none from Kodak except for T-Max, one from Fujifilm and a few other manufacturers producing them. But slower ISO black and white films aren’t really spoken of except for Acros. Black and white ISO 100 films are great for studio and portraiture work but in many cases have the versatility to deliver great results when pushed.

Lomography’s Earl Grey 100 used to be an older emulsion of Kodak T-Max 100. But that’s changed over the years. It’s now a Fomapan emulsion. But in the end, who cares? All that matters is the results.

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Take a Trip With John Emery’s Astonishing Black and White Landscape Photography

All images and words by John Emery. Used with permission. Be sure to follow him on Instagram @jemeryphoto

My number one goal as a photographer is to capture a moment in time as I experienced it when I released the shutter button. I want people to look at a photograph that I took and to feel as if they were standing there with me at the moment I took it. My specialty is the natural landscape in black and white – I’ve always been attracted to the drama, texture, detail, and contrast of a well-done black and white photograph.

I had just turned 23 and had never left the eastern time zone. On a whim I flew to Las Vegas, rented a car, and visited the Grand Canyon. I was woefully unprepared for the trip – I hadn’t seen snow in 15 years and it made me realize that south Florida living had made me ill-prepared for northern Arizona in late November. Regardless, I was hooked. Since that first trip I have been all over the country, and with each successive trip more photographic equipment joined me.

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The New Nikon ES-2 Film Digitizing Adapter Will Make Film Scanning So Much Easier

In addition to the new Nikon D850 DSLR, the Nikon ES-2 Film Digitizing Adapter is making its debut too. What’s that? Film? Yes. By using this adapter with Nikkor macro lenses and a flash, you can get high resolution scans of your 35mm negative or slide film images. When you’re using the Nikon D850, the camera will work to convert the images in-camera to positives. Considering the world’s rise in analog film photography and Nikon’s history in the film industry, it makes a whole lot of sense and is a really nice move to see Nikon doing this.

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Babette de Jong: A Talent for Fantastic Analog Film Landscape Photography

All images by Babette de Jong. Used with permission.

When Babette de Jong sent us an email to submit to the analog zine, I carefully went through her submission as I have with everyone who entered to be featured. Babette’s strength is in landscape photography. She loves film photography and strives to get it all as perfectly right in camera as she possibly can.

But more importantly, she’s just a good photographer. And her submission is after the jump.

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Using a Single Speedlight to Make a Stick of Old Spice Look Interesting

Screenshot taken from the video.

For every photographer who has ever been afraid of flash photography, we’ve got a special treat for you. Photographer Dustin Dolby created a fantastic video on how he used a single speedlight to create a magazine quality photo of Old Spice. In the video, he takes viewers through his mistakes just to see what the light does to each scene. Dustin moves the light from one place to another, uses a softbox, adds reflectors, etc. He successfully shows off what lighting in the right place can do for a photo.

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Simulating the Look of Ilford FP4 Black and White Film with Your Sony Camera

When you consider the history of Ilford film, Delta probably gets the most love despite another film like Ilford FP4 being highly capable and perhaps even better at delivering a look that so many modern digital photographers try to emulate. Through lots of experimentation though, I’ve been able to find a way to mimic the look of the film with a Sony a7 or Sony a7r II. It’s a fact, if there is one thing beyond battery life that photographers complain about with Sony cameras then it’s sometimes the colors. The camera company has been known to deliver incredibly saturated (sometimes a bit too much) colors in their images. This partially comes from the lenses that they work with. To get the best absolute best colors that you really want, I suggest leaving Lightroom for Capture One 10. But if you’d just like some great images which you’ll be fine with when it comes to the JPEGs then consider this short tutorial.

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Colorgrams: Combining Psychology and Analog Photography Accidents

All images by Kay Adams. Used with permission. Editor’s Note, in a previous version of this article we referred to Kay as a woman. Kay is actually a man! We apologize for this error.

“I am currently working as a Psychologist, creating photos both as a part of my job and as compensation.” says photographer Kay Adams in his email to us. “Ever since I was 16, I tried to get my hands on everything related to photography. I started digital, but switched almost completely to analog photography.” Born in Germany in 1989, Kay cites a sense of deeper connection to her analog romance. He calls this series his “Colorgrams” and in some ways, they remind me of Rorschach drawings.

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