Making Your Landscape Photography Look Like Paintings In Camera

One of the artistic ways you can make your landscape photography stand out from the rest is to find a way to turn them into paintings. Not literally, but a method to get that look in camera is one fantastic way of doing things. You may ask yourself, “Why not just do this in post?” Well, the reason why is because everyone can find a way to do it in post, but not everyone has the specific talent to do things in camera and not everyone really wants that “photoshopped look”.

So let’s take a deeper delve into this amazingly simple tutorial.

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How to Shoot Colorful Bokehlicious Night Portraits

 

What goes well with street portraits and night photography? Bokeh, many photographers now will immediately tell you. It’s not exactly a new concept and many of us have been playing around with bokeh for all sorts of concepts and projects. But, seeing how the so-called bokehlicious night portraits are so trendy now, it may well be worth it to see how it’s done and what makes it so popular. Manila-based photographer Gab Loste has shared his process in a quick video tutorial.

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From the Pit: An Introduction to Photographing Concerts

All concert photography images by Olivia Pasquarelli

In my opinion, shooting live music is one of the most challenging photographic experiences possible. For starters, there is very low light, and it’s constantly changing. I’ve shot in venues that are lit by a single bare lightbulb hanging from the ceiling, and venues that have light shows that move beams of colored light in all directions. In addition, your subjects are constantly and unpredictably moving around. You’re surrounded by people who, depending on what genre of music you’re shooting, are dancing, jumping, pushing you and spilling drinks left and right. Depending on your access, you may have a limited amount of time to get the perfect shot.  Most larger venues only give photographers the first three songs to shoot.

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Eight Quick Tips on How to Ask Strangers for Portraits

You may have missed opportunities for incredible street portraits because of fear of taking photos of strangers. I myself have imagined scenarios where my candid subjects yell at me or attack me. Luckily, in my six years taking photographs of strangers throughout New York City, and in small towns in the tri state area, that has never happened.

All the photographs included here are images I shot in the neighborhood I currently live, Brighton Beach, Brooklyn. In my time living here, I’ve spent many hours on the boardwalk, beach, and streets, admiring the unique residents of the area. For a long time, I was too afraid to turn my camera towards the beachgoers, bench-sitters, elderly couples, chess players, and beautiful citizens of my neighborhood. I slowly learned (with some mistakes along the way) how to make the people of Brooklyn’s oceanside sanctuary more comfortable with having their photo taken. Here are eight tips to overcome this fear and become a better street photographer.

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How Photographers Can Use Hard Light for Beautiful Portraits

Screenshot image from the video by Adorama on hard light

In some of the previous video tutorials we shared, we were told that a soft light setup is the best for portrait work, especially if you’re working with female models. If you’re curious about how hard light can be used to make beautiful portraits, even for female models, this quick Adorama tutorial by Daniel Norton shows us how.
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Martin Beddall: Tips From a Wedding Photojournalist

Hats at the ready as we are half way through our favourite time of year – wedding season! Beautiful dresses, flowers and memories that will last a life time – it’s one of the most special and important days, and having a great photographer there to capture these moments is priceless.

Martin Beddall has been working in the photography industry over 25 years. His background is in national newspapers and magazines having worked for The Times for over ten years and capturing some extremely special and unique moments along the way. It’s this passion to record important moments that led Martin to wedding photography. Here, Martin tells us how he uses his photojournalistic eye to capture the emotional, happy and often chaotic moments of wedding day through his award-winning reportage photography.

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Using A Reflector For Natural Light Boudoir Photography

Featured Image Is A Screen Grab From The Video Featured In This Post. All Credit To Jen Rozenbaum and Westcott.

If you have not heard; reflectors are a natural light photographers best friend. These handy discs help photographers bounce light, filling in the shadows on a subject in a pleasing way. Natural light photography is incredibly popular in the boudoir niche, and today we have a great video showing how to use a reflector to make the most out of the window light available. Continue reading…

Photographer Kevin Mullins Talks About His Documentary Style Approach to Weddings

Images in this article and video are by Kevin Mullins. Used with permission.

If you were to check out the work of photographer Kevin Mullins, you’d immediately fall in love with his classic documentary style approach to wedding photography. He tells the Phoblographer that he draws influence from photographers like Jeff Ascough and others. At the Fujifilm Festival in NYC this year, we got a chance to talk with Kevin about this approach.

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The Strobist David Hobby Gives You Tips on How to Get Into Off Camera Flash Photography

At the Fujifilm Festival in NYC, we had the chance to pick the mind of David Hobby: otherwise known as the Strobist. He gave us a number of tips on how to get into flash photography if you’re just getting started. We always preface this with saying that off-camera flash is about thinking creatively with your subjects and your photos. You add an element and tend to do a lot more than just capturing a moment. Instead, it’s about creating something that isn’t there.

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Common Mobile Photography Mistakes and How to Fix Them

If there’s one thing photographers of all experience levels agree upon, it can sometimes be tough to create a beautiful photograph with a mobile phone. Luckily, the most common photo fails are getting easier to fix as smartphone technology improves. Whether it’s simply wiping the lens of your camera phone, switching to the manual mode, or composing and or autofocusing, there are various fixes and hacks. Here are 8 of the most common issues with smartphone images and the easy changes you can make to fix each one.

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How to Get Film-like Warm Skin Tones With Daylight White Balance

One of the reasons I use specific white balances like Daylight when shooting photos is because it tends to take the guesswork out of editing and colors. Daylight white balance is balanced to be fairly warm and to counteract the already very cool light that daylight is. Though many times there are situations where you’d rather have warm skin tones in the scene. For the most part, what people tend to do is just work with the white balance to make the skin warmer but then in the process just make the whole scene warmer.

This happens a whole lot when working during the blue hour, in overcast weather etc.

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Photographing the Total Eclipse: Tips from My Last One in 1991

This is a guest blog post by Ellis Vener. All images and text by ©Ellis Vener are being used with permission.

Being in the path of totality during a total solar eclipse is one of the very coolest, weirdest, and most benign natural phenomena you can ever experience. As the eclipse progresses through totality the air around you cools, natural sounds change, and during totality not only does the sun go dark except for the sun’s corona’ extending beyond the edge of the moon, but the light in the sky and on the land is like nothing else I have ever experienced. To say it is an awesome (a word which when used here means “extremely impressive and very different from anything else I have ever experienced”) experience is an understatement.

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The Beginner’s Guide to Using Gels as a Strobist Photographer

Gels are bound to scare away most portrait photographers and strobists simply because they don’t understand how to really use them. But one of the coolest things that you can do as a photographer is learn how to use gels to tell a different story in your portraits and overall in your photography. You see, gels color the light output of your flash which is typically balanced to Daylight and therefore is very cool. But once you understand that you can make that light all sorts of various colors, you’ll get how awesome it can be to use gels.

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This Fiery Wedding Photo is a Single Exposure Done With Two Strobes

First of all the result with this Fiery Wedding Photo: The Hot Rod on Fire Shooting inspired me to this one. But there was a huge difference, this photograph was done with only one exposure. We got it done after a lot of preparation – a nearly three-meter-long diy fire torch, two strobes and a 4.4 seconds exposure created this image. Planning took this time much longer, Because we had to build a small pond with a platform for the reflection. Additionally, I had to cut down some branches from a tree to get enough space.

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Here’s How You Get Wind Whipped Hair in Your Portraits

Photographer Chantal Routhier recently did a short tutorial on how to get that wind whipped look in your hair for portraits that everyone loves. One of the biggest secrets: put the hair half back and half in front. Of course, this tutorial works best with longer hair and with more of a blustery day. Chantal has some excellent tips in her post but, to add more to this, the higher your elevation is, the better the chances for you to get more wind. Additionally, going to a waterfront will work wonders. Chantal speaks about this and states that you should go behind rocks.

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Forget the Fireworks: Consider Photographing The Candid Moments This 4th of July

Hello America,

The 4th of July is tomorrow and we’re all surely prepping for some BBQs, fireworks, more fireworks, friends, family, fun, and even more fireworks. Go ahead, shoot some photos of those fireworks. We’ve got plenty of tutorials to teach you how. But what you may also want to consider is also just photographing the good times and moments that occur. Sure, your fireworks photos will be beautiful, but so too will all those picturesque moments you end up capturing throughout the day and night.

With that said, don’t forget to turn the camera on your friends and family. Capturing them having fun is a whole lot more personal and will remind you and them of some of the fun times from that night and day. Your fireworks images are simply just that, personal. They’re for you. And they may get you some likes on Facebook, but involving other people will get you even more.

Sounds crazy? No, not really. Party photographers do it all the time. Sometimes they find a way to shoot wide and incorporate people in their photos and the fireworks with it all.

In the end: just remember to take photos of the people who are closest to you.

Happy Birthday America.

– Chris

 

How Color Affects Leading Lines in Landscape Photography

On the Phoblographer, we tend to talk a whole lot about color, black and white, and how incredibly important it is to use them effectively in your photography. We typically apply them to portraiture, but it’s also not too terrible of an idea to apply it to landscape photography. You see, in landscape photography there are a few basic rules to creating better landscapes photos and for the most part they apply to creating better color images. But when it comes to making black and white or even just creating more striking color, there are a few other techniques you may not have tried yet.

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Quick Tip: How to Choose the Right Shoes for Photowalking

You know the feeling if you’re a photographer with some gear on you: you go about walking around for a while but then after some time you need a break. You have to refuel but most importantly, your feet hurt. That can sometimes be the biggest issue when it comes to photowalking. Everyone will tell you to wear comfortable shoes; but no one really goes into that any further. For me personally, sometimes my nicer shoes tend to be comfortable enough for most excursions I go on. However, that all depends on what gear I have with me.

And with that, I’m going to get really into how to choose the right shoes for photowalking.

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How to Shoot Better Travel Photography From Airplanes Using Your Phone

Shooting photos from planes can honestly be tough to do some times, but believe it or not what really, truly matters in the end is the final result. If you’re one of those folks sitting at a window seat, you should really take advantage of all the intoxicating views that are granted to you to the best of your ability. Of course, you’ll generally need to be some place away from the wings for starters and then you can concentrate on whatever is in front of of you so that you can share that gorgeous vista later on with all your friends on social media.

Take the advice of a photo editor who travels a whole lot for work.

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Tip: Damage a Disposable Camera to Get a Different Look

Photographer Kate Hook is an experimental, creative, modern analog film photographer who loves experimenting with new ideas and tricks. We’ve featured her work here before when she souped her LomoChrome Purple film; and now she’s back with a video on having fun with a disposable camera. While most photographers would scoff at using one due to their plastic lenses and crappy quality, Kate has the idea of being experimental and embracing it. In fact, she takes it even further.

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