Shoot Kodak Gold 200 with These Great Medium Format Cameras

If you’re as excited about the new Kodak Gold 200 120 like a lot of film photographers are, then you’re probably considering getting a new camera to shoot with it. Lots of beautiful images can be made with Kodak Gold. In the 120 format, you’re bound to get even better colors than in the 35mm format that it’s been known for for years. Luckily for you, we’ve got some tips and a list of our favorite medium format cameras right here for you. Better yet, we’ve tested all these cameras ourselves.

Pro Tips on Shooting Kodak Gold 200

Shooting Kodak Gold 200 is pretty straightforward if you’ve been shooting film for a while. But here are some tips for you:

  • These cameras are going to specifically be great when shooting Kodak Gold 200. They offer a ton of versatility, boast wonderful lenses, and they’re pretty affordable for what they are.
  • Generally speaking, you should overexpose negative film by a stop and then develop normally.
  • Kodak says that you’ll get warm tones from this film. Kodak Gold 200 is daylight balanced, which tends to be much warmer than Tungsten balanced film.
  • If you really want a warmer tone to your photos, shoot Kodak Gold 200 with a warming filter on your lens. If you’re using a flash, add a slightly orange gel.
  • This isn’t a “professional film” so to speak. But you can more than get professional results from it as long as you’re shooting, processing and scanning accordingly.
  • You can pick up some new Kodak Gold 200 in 120 format at Amazon.

Fujifilm GW690 III: A Fixed Lens Rangefinder

Pros

  • Compact size
  • Brightest rangefinder I’ve ever seen
  • Near 35mm field of view is exactly what I want
  • Super shallow depth of field
  • No electronics so it shouldn’t break down

Cons

  • A bit too much plastic for my liking
  • Lens hood needs to be flipped up in order to change the exposure parameters
  • Rangefinder functionality means that using a graduated ND filter is a guessing game.

In our review, we concluded:

“I’ve been using the Fujifilm GW690 III for a really long time now. By far, it’s my most used medium format film camera, even over my Mamiya RB67 Pro S. That’s because it’s got a small(ish) size, fantastic lens, rangefinder focusing, and it’s reliable. Sure, you’re only getting eight shots per 120 film roll, but if you’re careful then that’s enough.”

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Pentax 67: Natural Light + Kodak Gold 200 = Bliss

Pros

  • Fairly portable vs the Mamiya system
  • Heavy
  • Good lineup of lenses
  • Good selection of diopters that can help
  • Various finders
  • Great feel in the hand
  • Depth of field preview with the lenses
  • Leaf shutter lenses available for a fast flash sync.

Cons

  • Changing the focusing screen to get a brighter one could be difficult
  • 1/30th flash sync
  • Reloading can be a major pain and sometimes needs to be done carefully

In our review, we concluded:

“The Pentax 67 is honestly a fantastic medium format SLR camera. It has found a way into the heart of so many photographers. With a plethora of fantastic lenses, it is surely best used when shooting with natural light outdoors. It’s not the best for studio work and location work with a flash due to the long flash duration of 1/30th. You’ll also want to use wider lenses for something like that.”

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Mamiya RB67 Pro S: Queen of the Studio

Pros

  • Fully analog. No electronics inside whatsoever.
  • Big, heavy, beautiful feeling piece of machinery
  • Fantastic lenses
  • Very bright viewfinder
  • Built like a goddamn tank
  • Very smooth and precise focusing
  • Ability to flip from landscape to portrait perspective
  • Lots of steps to put into place that really lock you into the process of shooting.

Cons

  • Not recommended for the inexperienced photographer at all.

In our review, we concluded:

“The Mamiya RB67 Pro S is a camera meant for the serious photographer that wants to stick to analog. It’s a studio and landscape camera that will most likely require a tripod from you. They’re fantastic to use; but also keep in mind its difficulty.”

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Mamiya 6: A Favorite Rangefinder of Ours

Pros

  • Mamiya’s lenses are legendary
  • Collapses to become even smaller
  • Shutter cocking mechanism that needs to be cocked after loading up new film helps ensure future shutter problems
  • Fairly bright rangefinder
  • Electronic metering
  • Silent, well, almost
  • So incredibly lightweight
  • You’ll want to take this everywhere

Cons

  • Can be expensive for sure.

In our review, we concluded:

“I’ve been on the search for the perfect medium format film camera for me for years now. This, the Fujifilm GW690 III, and the Mamiya RB67 Pro S are amongst my favorites. I prefer to have a multitude of formats and cameras that can handle different situations accordingly. But of any of those, the Mamiya 6 seems to offer the most versatility. I can use it for documentary work, studio work, landscapes, portraiture, and so much. It’s just meant to be a damned good professional film camera.”

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The Phoblographer’s various product round-up features are done in-house. Our philosophy is simple: you wouldn’t get a Wagyu beef steak review from a lifelong vegetarian. And you wouldn’t get photography advice from someone who doesn’t touch the product. We only recommend gear that we’ve fully reviewed. If you’re wondering why your favorite product didn’t make the cut, there’s a chance it’s on another list. If we haven’t reviewed it, we won’t recommend it. This method keeps our lists packed with industry-leading knowledge. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Chris Gampat

Chris Gampat is the Editor in Chief, Founder, and Publisher of the Phoblographer. He also likes pizza.