Kodak Gold 200 120 Review – The Tones Are Beautiful!

One of the best things happening in photography is the resurgence of film. Of course, digital is excellent and meets the immediate demands of today’s world. But, digital also sucks the joy out of photography in many instances. The romance of the art is alive and well in film photography. The process is therapeutic and invigorating. There’s nothing like slowing down, taking in the scene, and pressing the shutter at the perfect moment. Plus, the beautiful tones in color film are what inspire many actions, presets, and styles. Kodak Gold 200 120 is no exception to this mantra.

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Shoot Kodak Gold 200 with These Great Medium Format Cameras

If you’re as excited about the new Kodak Gold 200 120 like a lot of film photographers are, then you’re probably considering getting a new camera to shoot with it. Lots of beautiful images can be made with Kodak Gold. In the 120 format, you’re bound to get even better colors than in the 35mm format that it’s been known for for years. Luckily for you, we’ve got some tips and a list of our favorite medium format cameras right here for you. Better yet, we’ve tested all these cameras ourselves.

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What to Know About the Exciting New Kodak Gold 200 120 Format

Yes, it’s real! Today, Kodak is announcing their new Kodak Gold 200 in 120 Format. And there’s a lot of good news that’s supposed to come along with that! For starters, this is the first time in a while that Kodak has announced a 120 film. The previous one was Ektachrome after it made a revival. But in today’s world, film has become a lot more expensive because of demand. With that said, Kodak Gold 200 120 Format is bound to be very welcome. We’re breaking down a few things you should know about the new product.

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Film Review: Lomography Color Negative 100 (120 and 35mm Formats)

“It’s Kodak Gold,” I’m often told by Lomography reps about Lomography Color Negative 100. The film is one of the offerings from Lomography that is also a more affordable option at times in both 35mm and 120. Now, some folks may scoff at the idea of shooting Kodak Gold since for years, it was designed for being shot by just consumers. But in truth, it’s capable of delivering some seriously lovely colors. To that end, so too is Lomography Color Negative 100. At times, I genuinely feel like Lomography Color Negative 100 sometimes just intensifies whatever scene is just in front of you. But either way, if you’re looking for a low ISO alternative because you don’t like Kodak Ektar’s colors, then Lomography Color Negative 100 is a very viable option.

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