If the Fujifilm GFX 50S II is Real, We Want to See This

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The reports abound of the Fujifilm GFX 50S II. Is it real? Are we getting another 50MP Medium format camera? Of anything I’ve heard, this seems to be the most unlikely. But I’m not going to completely rule out the idea here. Of any of Fujifilm’s medium format cameras, the Fujifilm GFX 50S was the most unappealing. Overall though, it wasn’t a bad camera. So how can Fujifilm make this one stand out from the pack? Well, if it’s real, we’d like to see the following.

Better, More Accurate Face and Eye Autofocus Detection

Ever heard of Fujifilm Eyelash AF? Well, that’s surely one of the problems the system has. One of the biggest problems with Fujifilm and the GFX series is accurate autofocus. Sometimes when you focus on a subject, their eyes won’t actually be in focus. So Fujifilm needs to refine this. We’re not only talking about the accuracy, though. The overall speed should take a leap forward. The Fujifilm GFX 100S is very fast. And with fewer megapixels, the Fujifilm GFX 50S II should be blazing fast. I don’t see any reason why it shouldn’t compete with Sony and Canon on various fronts.

What’s more, how about putting in animal AF? Or scene recognition AF features for journalism?

Insanely Good High ISO Output, with the Option of Film Grain

At just 50MP and a medium format sensor, full-frame 35mm sensors are catching up. But then, how does a medium format sensor compete? Well, it would need much better high ISO output. Our tests involve printing photos at ISO 6400 and 17×22 inches. Personally, I’m considering working with the team on aiming for 25,600 ISO now. That would be a major reason to get a Fujifilm GFX 50S II instead. But practically speaking, how often do people really need to shoot that high? 

This is an important question, and it’s critical for medium format. Because the lenses are slower, you inherently need better high ISO output. So this is going to be big for medium format shooting. 

Of course, this is also Fujifilm. So you’re going to want that film grain look. And I hope that option never disappears.

Capture One ProStandard ICC Profile

Technically, Fujifilm would need to work with Capture One on this. But the Fujifilm GFX 50S II should have the ProStandard ICC profile attached. For the record, anyone that tells me to use Lightroom instead typically gets laughed at by me. Capture One isn’t perfect, but it’s a far better editor than Lightroom.

Speed

The idea of speed is a holistic one.

  • Autofocus
  • High ISO output
  • Processing power
  • Frame rate shooting
  • Tracking capabilities
  • Controls
  • Image stabilization

This should be a serious camera for photojournalists.

Just Keep the EVF Attached, But Vari-Angle, Please

I really hope that this time, Fujifilm needs the EVF attached. It doesn’t need to come off. But it should be a vari-angle EVF for sure. I truly think more cameras need this. 

Faster Flash Sync Speed

The Fujifilm GFX 50S had a 1/125 flash sync. Really, folks? That’s kind of pathetic and one of the biggest reasons why I’d never consider buying one. The Fujifilm GFX 50S II should hopefully have a 1/320th or 1/500th flash sync. 

Natura Film Simulation? Or Superia? Or a Tungsten Film?

Film simulations are important to the Fujifilm environment. And if you’re not using them, you’re throwing away a major reason to buy and use the cameras. You don’t need to shoot for three hours and spend 10 hours editing. So let’s get a new, exciting film simulation. How about Natura? Or Superia proper? Or what about one of the older Fujifilm Tungsten films?

The Question of an XTrans Sensor

As the megapixel count goes up, the X-Trans sensor debate comes into play. Do we need an X-trans sensor anymore? Can Fujifilm do it all with just processing power? Maybe they can use it to create a much better high ISO output. Personally, I’d like to see what an XTrans sensor can do at the medium format range.

You can read more of a recap on Fuji Rumors.

Chris Gampat

Chris Gampat is the Editor in Chief, Founder, and Publisher of the Phoblographer. He also likes pizza.