Review: Nikon D850 (A Fantastic DSLR, But I’m Over DSLRs)

The Nikon D850 surely has to be one of our new favorite DSLRs.

If you look around at various reviews of the Nikon D850 on the web, they’ll most likely rate it as one of the best cameras ever made thus far. In truth, it really does perform very admirably and it absolutely does have a great sensor at the heart. Professional photographers considering making some sort of move since the Nikon D810 hadn’t been updated in awhile have an option that is going to last them a few more years before the industry changes yet again. That statement is more or less the basis of my review. The days of being able to know that your camera won’t be updated for four years are probably gone, but that doesn’t mean you won’t be able to take great photos with it long after it has been updated by some shiny new thing. The Nikon D850 is a fantastic image taking device and tool in the hands of the right photographer. It has a lot of great technology at the heart, but a part of me is wondering about its futureproofing.

Continue reading…

Review: Canon 6D Mk II

I want to get something straight that not a lot of reviews are putting out there: the Canon 6D Mk II isn’t a bad camera, in fact for most people, it will be a pretty darned good one. But for the rest of us who are at a point where we are demanding more from our cameras and image quality, we shouldn’t even be looking at this one. In many ways, the Canon 6D Mk II is the modern Canon full frame Rebel. What do I mean by that? Canon has squarely given the camera enough features to please the folks who just want to move up to full frame and their current lineup of users. There’s nothing incredibly revolutionary about it and the folks at the NYTimes aren’t bound to write praises about it; but at the same time it isn’t a terrible camera at all.

But in every single way, it isn’t something I’d recommend to any sort of working pro or semi-professional except for perhaps portrait photographers.

Continue reading…

The Best Canon Cameras For Low-Light Photography

As we recently did with the Fujifilm cameras, today we wanted to take a look at the current Canon lineup of cameras to discuss the best options for you in low-light performance is something that you are looking for from your next camera purchase.

Also as a reminder, our primary factors considered here are low-light AF Performance and High ISO Image Quality – but also taking ‘bang for buck’ into account. Ready? Let’s jump into it… Continue reading…

Review: Canon Rebel T7i

If you’re a person who has been looking to just get into photography, there’s a strong chance you’ve considered the Canon Rebel T7i. The Canon Rebel lineup of cameras often sell well due to Canon’s name, their bundles, and aggressive marketing/pricing. They’ve always been considered very entry level and they really still are. But one thing that I’ve always been fascinated by is the fact that their image quality is pretty good when you’re looking at other cameras, comparatively speaking. The Canon Rebel T7i is surely better than your smartphone and has much more capabilities in some ways.

But at the same time, there are arguably better options available from the likes of Sony and Fujifilm.

Continue reading…

Review: Canon 77D

The logic behind the Canon 77D is one that in some ways doesn’t really make sense to me. But if Canon believes that it will get them sales, then so be it. However, with at least three Rebels, two mid tier, and one high end tier APS-C camera there’s a lot of head scratching to do. I mean, why not do something similar between the 5D series and the 1D series? Or between the Canon 5D and 6D? Either way there are surely a number of really interesting things about the Canon 77D such as the 24MP APS-C sensor, the interestingly pleasant ergonomic controls, the autofocus that almost never missed a shot, and Canon’s incredibly simple and straight forward menu interface that I wish everyone else would get half as right.

Though to be fair, it shouldn’t be this expensive.

Continue reading…

Review: Canon EOS M6 (Canon EF-M Mount)

If you were to look at the mirrorless camera world, it would appear that Canon, with the Canon M6, is an entry into the world where they’re still trying to find themselves. To some, they could look like an experimental 20 something trying in vain to get their life together. Yet somehow or another, I genuinely never thought that I’d like the Canon M6. The camera isn’t designed to be the highest end mirrorless camera from Canon, yet somehow or another it’s a camera that surely deserves respect in some ways and groans of frustration at the fact that Canon has gotten this camera almost perfectly right yet it feels like they were purposely holding themselves back. The Canon M6 has at its heart a 24MP APS-C sensor which is smaller than all the other options out there from Fujifilm, Sony, Pentax, Sigma–and let’s be honest because they’re all more or less made by Sony. Designed for the enthusiast, the Canon M6 has some very tough competition from the entire camera world. Yet somehow or another, this truly is a camera that you need to personally experience to understand.

Continue reading…

Review: Sony a9

It took Sony long enough, but earlier this year the company announced a true flagship mirrorless camera: the Sony a9. The Sony a9 is designed to take on the likes of the Canon 1DX Mk II and the Nikon D5. It’s a camera designed for a photojournalist who needs not a whole lot of resolution but a balance between that and good high ISO output. To appeal to these photographers, Sony gave the Sony a9 an impressive 20 fps shooting ability with no blackout of the viewfinder. The autofocus is also very effective, and can be used with a variety of lenses designed for the Sony E mount. Other connections such as a built in ethernet port and dual card slots are also bound to be very valuable to these photographers. Indeed, the Sony a9 is a camera for the working pro who brings in gainful employment and taxable income using their camera. With that said, you’d be absolutely stupid to purchase this for street photography unless you’re making some serious money off of it–so just stop right there.

Despite how fantastic it is, Sony still hasn’t gotten it 100% perfectly right. But to be fair, neither have Canon or Nikon.

Continue reading…

Gallery: Sony a9 High ISO Image Samples (And Extended Impressions)

We’re almost done with our review of the new Sony a9 camera; and so far it’s shaping up to mostly be pretty great. This post is to mostly showcase High ISO image samples from the new Sony a9, and before we go on you should know that it does a fantastic job and I personally like the high ISO output even more than I do from the Sony a7s II. The Sony a9 is targeted at the professional photographer who uses the Canon 1DX Mk II and the Nikon D5. But in some ways it also is trying to go after the Pentax 645z, the Hasselblad X1D and the Fujifilm GFX 50s with the wedding photography crowd. For the most part, those photographers will have found one of the best cameras that they can use.

Continue reading…