Best of the Best: Great Landscape Photography Cameras for Every Budget

gear doesn't matter
Whether you have under a grand, or unlimited funds, we’ve rounded up the best cameras for landscape photography that will fit any photographers budget.

There’s nothing better than heading out into the wilderness, the peace, the quiet, and the fresh air with just your camera so that you can capture the beauty of the world that surrounds you. These days, the great thing is that there are cameras on the market at every price point imaginable that will help you capture and create some genuinely breathtaking landscape images. If you’re ready to get into landscape photography, and you want to capture the splendor of the great wide open, the cameras listed after the break are the ones that should be on your radar.

Pentax K1 MK II
Captured with the Pentax K1 II

The cameras for landscape photography that we’ve listed in this roundup are more than capable of performing in the landscape genre, regardless of their price. These cameras and the sensors they use will capture tons of details, they will produce gorgeous colors, and they won’t let you down when it comes to dynamic range either. We have broken down the list of cameras for landscape photography into price brackets, and you can quickly jump to them with the handy table of contents. No matter which camera for landscape photography you pick up, you’ll be creating and producing landscape images that will wow whoever looks at them in no time at all.

Cameras for Landscape Photography Under $1,000

Sony a6100

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Small and very light
  • Autofocus system is beyond fast
  • 11 frames per second burst mode and 425 AF points
  • Real-time Eye AF and Animal Eye AF
  • Great tracking capabilities
  • Very Good overall image quality
  • Decent battery life
  • Flip-up screen for selfies
  • The splash screens that tell new photographers what each mode does is a nice touch
  • It’s under $600!

Cons

  • The EVF and LCD are low quality
  • No weather sealing
  • The layout of the controls should be simplified
  • The menu system is still convoluted. Simplify, Sony! Simplify
  • You still cannot use the touchscreen to navigate the menus
  • Only 1/4000s max shutter speed
  • The camera desperately needs a shutter speed dial on the grip
  • Just one UHS-1 card slot
  • The camera slows down a lot when writing files to the SD card after a burst
  • A USB 2.0 port. What year is this? Come on Sony
  • No included dedicated charger

Buy now: $598

Nikon D7500

Landscape Photography

Here are the pros and coms from our full review:

Pros

  • Solid Build
  • Incredible Battery life
  • Control Wheels and Thumb ‘Multi Selector’ changes setting quickly
  • Touchscreen to preview images, and control finer settings
  • Wi-fi and Bluetooth integrated
  • Burst function works wonderfully
  • Much more affordable than the D500

Cons

  • Needed to remove the lens to carry in small messenger bags
  • Probably overkill for anyone short of Semi-Professionals

Buy now: $896.95

Olympus OMD EM5 Mark III

Landscape Photography

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Beautiful retro styling
  • Excellent image quality
  • Robust weather sealing
  • Reliable image stabilization
  • Accurate autofocus
  • Compact form factor
  • Built-in Live Composite and 50 MP High Resolution shooting modes are highly effective

Cons

  • Form factor can be too compact for some
  • Plasticky build quality
  • Single UHS-II SD Card slot
  • Lacks dedicated joystick
  • Poor battery life
  • Convoluted menu systems
  • No major innovations after over four years

Buy now: $999

Canon EOS RP

camera deals

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • This isn’t Canon innovating on the inside, but instead on the outside
  • This is the smallest and lightest ILC full-frame camera on the market
  • Goes well with a wrist strap and a light prime lens
  • Weather sealing
  • The autofocus isn’t bad, and it’s quite usable in a number of working conditions
  • Pretty good image quality

Cons

  • This camera is begging to be paired with a nice 50mm f1.8 lens.
  • Could have done better with a joystick

Buy now: $999

landscape photography

Pro Tip: To get the most out of any of the cameras we have listed here for landscape photography, you’re going to need a good, sturdy tripod. Not sure which one to buy? Check out the roundup of tripods for landscape photography we put together here.

Landscape Photography Cameras Between $1000-$3000

Fujifilm X-T3

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Brand new 26.1MP X-Trans CMOS 4 Sensor
  • Brand new X-Processor 4 Image Processor
  • Excellent weather sealing
  • Very solid build quality
  • Excellent image quality
  • In body RAW processing with built-in film simulation profiles
  • Versatile RAW files
  • Amazing video capabilities
  • Dual SD card slots (if your workflow requires it)

Cons

  • Battery life can use some improvement
  • Lacks in-body image stabilization
  • Low light performance is improved over the previous generation X-T2, but hit rates during high-speed low light situations still leave much to be desired

Buy now: $1,199

Pentax K1 Mk II

Landscape Photography

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Enough weather sealing to last a lifetime
  • Rock-solid build quality
  • Easy to read LCD Screen
  • In-Body Image Stabilization / Pixel Shift
  • Gorgeous 100% coverage viewfinder
  • Excellent image quality
  • Dual SD Card slots
  • Great battery life
  • That little light above the lens mount

Cons

  • Only 33 focus points
  • Autofocus system won’t win any races
  • Extremely heavy
  • No touchscreen

Buy now: $1,679

Canon EOS R

Landscape Photography

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Build quality
  • Weather sealed like crazy
  • Autofocus is good
  • Protects the sensor when off
  • Canon’s menu system is still simple
  • Ergonomics feel nice
  • With a lightweight lens, it feels just as nice as a Sony camera
  • These are some of Canon’s best RAW files in years
  • Good battery life
  • Fast Wifi transfers

Cons

  • Needs Dual SD cards
  • Needs a joystick
  • The magic touch bar is odd and could use refinement
  • Optimizing the way the ISO, aperture, and shutter speed dials work, such as the automatic metering for ISO, not cool
  • Bigger than Sony cameras

Buy now: $1,799

Sony a7 III

Camera deals - Sony a7 III

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • The best battery life of any Sony or mirrorless camera we’ve ever tested
  • A fair amount of resolution and versatility in the RAW files
  • Nice feel to it
  • Consistency with all the other cameras in terms of the menu system
  • Autofocus can acquire a target in near darkness
  • It essentially feels like a scaled-down Sony a9 and Sony a7r III
  • Not a bad price point

Cons

  • Mount and certain lenses may allow for dust to get in onto the sensor

Buy now: $1,998

Nikon D850

Landscape Photography

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Fantastic image quality
  • Built like a tank
  • Buttons that light up
  • The touch screen makes the menu navigation so much better
  • Great color depth and versatility
  • Wifi and Bluetooth
  • Putting the ISO button on the right side of the camera by the grip is the better long term strategy
  • Weather sealing
  • Lots of video options
  • Dual card slots
  • The best viewfinder of any DSLR we’ve used

Cons

  • Slower autofocus than the Nikon D810 in some situations
  • We wish the white balance levels were a bit more adjustable
  • Sort of shocked the dual card slots aren’t both SD

Buy now: $2,996.95

Captured with the Hasselblad X1D II

Pro Tip: Landscape photography is one of the most rewarding genres, but there is more to it than just pointing and shooting your camera. Learning how to compose your image, figuring out how to include foreground elements, and knowing how to process your images in post is vital. If you are new to landscape photography and want to create some stunning spring landscapes, or would like a refresher, check out this affordable tutorial. You’ll be making gorgeous images in no time.

Landscape Photography Cameras for $3,000 and Over

Sony A7R IV

The next Canon EOS R needs to crush the Sony A7R IV

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Improved ergonomics
  • Blazing fast autofocus
  • Excellent weather sealing
  • Anti-flicker shooting
  • Dual UHS-II SD card slots
  • More resolution than most photographers will need

Cons

  • Limited touchscreen functionality: You still can’t navigate the menus or interact with the display
  • Large file sizes (to be expected)

Buy now: $3,498

Fujifilm GFX 50R

Landscape Photography

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Great image quality
  • Excellent high ISO output
  • High-speed sync with the Profoto Air system is a delight
  • Autofocus isn’t all that bad
  • Weather sealing is top-notch
  • Lightweight
  • Not that large overall
  • The ergonomics are very good

Cons

  • This system really needs lenses faster than f2
  • The autofocus could still use some revamps

Buy now: $3,499

Panasonic S1R

Landscape Photography

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Good image quality
  • Decent autofocus
  • Weather sealing throughout the body and the lenses
  • Direct buttons to get you exactly what you want
  • We really like the top LCD screen

Cons

  • The buttons and switches can probably get in the way of your shooting unless you thoroughly memorize them
  • It’s big, and it gets bigger when you put a lens on it
  • Abysmal battery life

Buy now: $3,697.99

The Hasselblad X1D II

Landscape Photography

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • It has a gorgeous design
  • The touchscreen is the best in the business
  • The user interface is, again, the best in the business
  • Image quality is simply stunning
  • Incredible build quality second to none
  • The resolution of the EVF and rear LCD are excellent
  • Great weather sealing

Cons

  • Only contrast detection for autofocus
  • Autofocusing in low light is not a thing
  • The autofocus on this camera is incredibly slow by modern standards
  • No eye or face detect, and no continuous focus modes
  • No rear joystick or thumbpad to choose focus points
  • It’s pricey at $5,750

Buy now: $5,750

Leica SL2

Landscape Photography

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • It’s built like a tank
  • Once you get the philosophy behind its creation, you stand to understand the things that set it apart
  • You can hammer nails in with it. Well, not really.
  • Very well weather sealed
  • Fantastic image quality
  • Pretty good battery life
  • Access to a lot of great lenses
  • Image stabilization is very good
  • The most finely detailed high ISO files that we’ve seen when printing

Cons

  • Nearly $6,000
  • Autofocus isn’t that of a nearly $6,000 camera
  • The menu system and interface is something you need to wrap your head around
  • No multiple exposure mode
  • We wish we could constantly see the information displayed in Menu 1
  • It’s big and heavy
  • The big size makes it a pain on trips
  • No flip or tilt screen

Buy now: $5,995

Pentax K1 MK II
Captured with the Pentax K1 II

Pro Tip: Landscape photography brings with it the chance that you could be caught out by the weather, so you want to make sure you are prepared for whatever Mother Nature decides to send your way. Before you head out, make sure to have some weatherproof camera and lens covers. These covers will ensure that your gear does not become damaged when the heavens open up. The best part: they are super cheap!

Fujifilm GFX 100

Landscape Photography

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • 102 amazing Megapixels
  • Under $10,000 for one of the most powerful Medium Format cameras on the market
  • It uses the same autofocus system as the X-T3
  • A gorgeous electronic viewfinder
  • The menu system is perhaps only second to Canon’s in terms of design
  • The image quality is simply jaw-dropping
  • Fantastic high ISO capabilities
  • Very good battery life
  • The top and rear LCD and OLED panels are easy to see and read in bright conditions

Cons

  • Quite possibly the worst ergonomics of any camera we’ve used
  • The thumb rest on the back is poorly designed
  • The body of the Fujifilm GFX 100 feels cheap
  • The buttons are mushy and have hardly any tactile feel
  • AF tracking was hit or miss, as was the eye AF
  • The touchscreen cannot be used to navigate the menu system
  • The grip is too shallow and does not provide a comfortable way to hold this 3lb camera
  • The vertical grip is untextured and incredibly slippery

Buy now: $9,999.95