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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Instagram for the iPad (1 of 1)ISO 2001-20 sec at f - 4.0

“It’s not about the ROI.”

That’s what social media managers and influencers used to say all the time. ROI is short for return on investment–and as most photographers know, you’re bound to invest a heck of a lot more into this industry than you will ever give back.

But in today’s day and age, while many professional photographers spend most of their time on marketing, we should be using our skills as creative image makers to actually market ourselves and the types of work that we do much better. What you’ll learn is that social media isn’t about trying to create a following and gain returns from it, it’s about proving to people that they should be interested in you and your work.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 16-55mm f2.8 WR review Graham's images (16 of 19)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 2.8

It’s extremely common for most photographers these days to simply just hold down a shutter button and hope that they get the right shot. But in the end, that just gives you loads and loads of extra images that you don’t necessarily need and you’ll end up with less keepers than you’d like. Fixing that problem means that you need to think about (in the brief window of time) the end result. And for that, you need to think about what you possibly see in a scene and how you can quickly capture it to ensure that you deliver a result that your mind’s eye saw.

Sounds really, really tough to do, right? It’s not that bad if you make the job easier for yourself by doing things like shooting in aperture priority where you have a bit of control over the image or you have an autofocus point already pre-selected for the scene. Automation of some of the settings lets you get to that end game image that you have in your head and greatly improves your chances of actually getting it.

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Pro Tip: Manual focus lenses make you require the way that your brain tells you to shoot. Instead of just putting a viewfinder to your eye, focusing, and shooting, sometimes you pre-focus, put the viewfinder to your eye and either shoot immediately or touch up just a bit. You can do this using the depth of field scale.

Pro Tip: Manual focus lenses make you require the way that your brain tells you to shoot. Instead of just putting a viewfinder to your eye, focusing, and shooting, sometimes you pre-focus, put the viewfinder to your eye and either shoot immediately or touch up just a bit. You can do this using the depth of field scale.

Modern autofocus is quite good–don’t get us wrong. But when push comes to shove and you need to capture a moment in a split-second, some focal lengths are easier to work with than others. Part of this has to do with depth of field at a specific distance and the other has to do with the specific focal length. For what it’s worth, a telephoto lens and a wide angle lens focused out to 7 feet away and shooting from the same distance will have a varying amount of the scene in focus. The telephoto will have less in focus while more of the scene will be in focus with the wider angle lens.

But at the same time, you may not want to be so close to the scene that you’re within arm’s length of the person or scene being photographed. So to do that, we’re recommending three focal lengths that are best for candid photos.

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Photographers Hoodie from Teespring front

Wedding photographers have called them “Uncle Bob.” Indeed they’re a plague to us. Folks sometimes say, “Oh, we’ll just ask so and so to shoot for us, it’ll be fine.” The concept of Uncle Bob has evolved over the years as DSLRs and other interchangeable lens cameras have become more popular and everyone begins to try their hand at photography.

For the site’s reviews and tutorials, I often shoot actresses, actors, models, and mix in some paying clientele. But they’ve all talked about a specific type of photographer that they call “The Guy with the Camera.” When they get a new look, their agents always tell them to get new photos done. In some situations, their agents say, “Don’t you have a friend with a camera that can do it for you?”

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 35mm f2 review product images (6 of 6)ISO 8001-50 sec at f - 3.9

The 35mm lens is one of the most classic and popular focal lengths that many photographers work with. We often see lots of posts on how to make the most of 50mm lenses, but there aren’t enough with 35mm lenses. The 35mm lens is arguably more akin to the human perspective since it focuses not only on what’s directly in front of you but also includes your peripheral vision. It’s too wide for portraits and we’d even argue that 50mm lenses are also too wide for portraits but they can work if you’re not shooting very close up and include a least half of the subject in the shot.

35mm lenses are also excellent for weddings, food, street photography and lots more. Here’s how to make the most of this iconic lens.

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julius motal the phoblographer covr photo product image-6

An inherent problem happens when you’re an editor of a photography website tasked with reviewing the images of many people. Photographers from all walks of life tend to want to make us look at their images–and we are incredibly grateful for that. But at the same time, we find many websites to be seemingly made during the Geocities days only to give way to your Myspace. Website design and navigation has progressed further than this, and the problem is that many photographers don’t understand it.

Here’s the key: make your website simple to use and navigate and folks will want to go through it all.

Don’t be lazy. You’re better than that.

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