Zak van Biljon’s Dreamy Landscapes Using Kodak Aerochrome

All images by Zak van Biljon. Used with permission.

You wouldn’t necessarily believe it, but photographer Zak van Biljon got bit by the photo bug after using a disposable camera. From the work he produces, you’d think he dove right into medium and large format from the start; but that couldn’t be further from the truth.

He hails from South African, and calls Red Turf his homeland–at least you can tell this from his images shot with Kodak Aerochrome. In 2003 he graduated as best student at the National College of Photography.

In 2004 he left the country and emigrated to Europe. It was in Rome where he discovered another sunlight, and in London where he scored himself on top of booking lists for prestigious underground labels. He continued his career as a part-time commercial photographer in Zurich, Switzerland, exerting his mastery in his fine art projects.

His work ranges from digital to analog, with skills in contemporary advertising and modern art photography. His main focus is the directorial handling of light as shown in his recent art work, capturing the world in infrared. The world seen in red and pink colours provides a new and impressive insight to reality as we know it.

Continue reading…

Understanding the Fujifilm GFX 50S and the Medium Format Mentality

It’s no secret: lots of photographers are drooling over the idea of shooting with the Fujifilm GFX 50S medium format camera. The idea of owning something bigger than full frame 35mm (though not even the size of true digital 645) is something that is bound to attract a whole lot of photographers. Then consider the fact that everyone and their mother is a photographer these days. Everyone will want a medium format camera because they’re becoming more and more affordable. Though for what it’s worth, I’m very positive that not everyone understands medium format.

In fact, you may honestly want to stick with 35mm, APS-C, or even Four Thirds.

Continue reading…

Tutorial: Zone Focusing With Super Wide Angle Lenses

One of the biggest strengths of manual focus lenses and the reason why so many photographers love using them has to do with a process called zone focusing–and Zeiss Milvus lenses like the 18mm f2.8 and 15mm f2.8 lens themselves well to this. For years the methods around zone focusing are what has allowed many photographers to outdo the fastest focusing autofocus cameras and lenses. Street photographers, landscape photographers, and many others have used the technique to ensure that they get sharp photos. When film photography was king, lots of photographers did this to ensure they got “the shot.” Digital photography and its inherent nature requires photographers to get even sharper photos.

When you’re shooting landscapes and architecture, you really want the best you can get. With manual focus lenses, sometimes the best thing to do is to use zone focusing.

Continue reading…

Nils Karlson: On Glaucoma and Shooting with Film

All images by Nils Karlson. Used with permission.

Photographer Nils Karlson is a 41 year old creative living in Germany. “I started photography in my late 30’s, almost a decade after I got a glaucoma diagnosis, which affects my eyesight – my right eye is useless for photography, so I adapted and became left-eyed.” His journey started with messing around with digital photography then moved to 35mm slide film. Eventually, he got into the square format with 120 film–and those are part of his series, “Earth Stands Still.”

Despite the odds being against him, he’s done a fantastic job.

Continue reading…

Review: MacPhun Aurora HDR 2017

Last year, MacPhun teamed up with Trey Ratcliff to create an HDR program for the Mac called Aurora HDR. Back then, it was a pretty good program; and with today’s announcement of Aurora HDR 2017 you get even more editing power overall. Aurora HDR 2017 features lots of new improvements like a polarizing filter, tone mapping, and a sleeker interface. Many experienced photographers will feel right at home here; and many HDR photographers that are careful with their in-camera shootings will be very pleased with what’s possible here.

Continue reading…

Massimo Lupidi’s Landscape Images Are About Feelings

All images by Massimo Lupidi. Used with permission.

“Photography for me is not looking, it’s feeling,” explains Massimo Lupidi in an email to the Phoblographer. “It’s my way of capturing what I see so I can relive those moments, those sensations and feelings again and again.” Massimo is an Ialian self-taught, freelance photographer with a background in travel reportage and scenics too, but he shoots other categories as well such as aerials, environment, creative photography, and people. With over twenty years of photography experience, he has been awarded in the United Nations “Focus on Your World” during the Earth Summit in 1992 and he has shot production stills for award-winning competitions, several exhibitions, covers for magazines, brochures, and books.

He attributes part of his creative vision (especially with landscapes) to attention to details.

Continue reading…

How to Use Zone Focusing To Make Capturing Photographs Easier

There are times and moments where even the best autofocus from the most advanced cameras won’t be able to deliver the image that you really want from them. In a situation like this, more advanced photographers often opt for a different method: zone focusing. Way before autofocus was even a concept, this is the method that was tried and true from many photographers out there. Lots of the world’s most iconic images were taken using this method and what you’ll find overall is that this old way of doing things can greatly help you out.

Continue reading…

Chris Carr: The Curious Findings in Puddle Reflections

All images by Chris Carr. Used with permission.

“As a photographer I pride myself in always looking at things differently.” says photographer Chris Carr. “My photography has come from my desire to share the beauty of this world from many years of traveling. From these travels I have developed an eye for capturing images which elicit a particular feeling, time or place.” Carr’s images have a surreal feeling to them in some ways–or at least his “Puddle Reflections” series does. These photos look to capture landscapes from reflections in puddles. They’re fun and they seem to merge worlds into one another.

Continue reading…