This Website Offers RAWs and JPEGs for Free

Photo by Wesaturate user maxigladkiy

If you’ve ever struggled with finding high-quality photos for your imaging needs, there’s a new website that offers to give them to you free of charge. This is the promise of a website called Wesaturate, founded by Seattle-based photographers Kash Goudarzi and Gifton Okoronkwo, and freshly deployed just this April. The platform claims to be a place where photographers can share and download RAW and JPEG photos for free, which can be particularly useful for those who are still learning the ropes of digital photography, or looking into purchasing their first digital gear.

“It’s great for anyone looking to download free, high-quality images and especially great for photographers who want to learn how to edit photos,” Goudarzi shared with us in an e-mail. “Another popular case is photographers downloading the RAW files of a certain camera before they decide to buy it or not.”

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Film Review: Fujifilm Provia 100f (35mm and 120 Formats)

There’s been a big personal void in my life when it comes to slide film since the first death of Kodak Ektachrome, and I haven’t been able to fill for a while. But perhaps the closest thing to filling that gap is Fujifilm Provia 100f. Lots of folks love negative film; but I’ve always been more partial to slide film. Slide film is sort of like a badge of honor: you have to get the exposure perfectly right and most of the time the camera doesn’t really do it. With negative film and the development process, you’ve got a lot more versatility. But with slide film, you have maybe one stop extra in either direction. Perhaps this is one of the trademarks of what makes film so fun–you have to get the image right and the editing process isn’t as simple as it is in digital.

But either way, I’m genuinely in love with Fujifilm Provia 100. Like any other film though, I adore it in medium format much more than in 35mm.

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How Closely Does Fujifilm Acros Compare To the Digital Film Simulation?

This is a syndicated blog post from our premium publication La Noir Image. Subscribe for as little as $15 for access and free presets; $40/year gets you all that and a tutorial video coming soon; $100/year gets this and a portfolio critique with Chris.

One question that lots of photographers who have shot film wonder about is how closely Fujifilm’s film simulations closely mimic the look of film. Considering how Fujifilm created Acros, it would make a whole lot of sense that their digital simulation would be the closest thing possible to the film, right? Well, that depends on a number of different situations.Fujifilm Neopan Acros can take on different looks based on how you shot it and how you develop it. For example, Rodinal may make it look one way vs another developer. Then you’ll need to consider how the images were obviously shot, how you’re lighting them, etc. To get a better idea though, we’ve been using Acros 100 in a number of situations plus we looked at one digital preset to see how it performed vs Fujifilm’s option.

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The Rule of Tenths is the Photographic Compositional Rule of Thirds on Hard Mode

You’ve obviously heard of the rule of thirds when it comes to composition, but have you heard of the rule of tenths? It’s basically a much more complicated rule of composition. Where the rule of thirds breaks images down into thirds diagonally and horizontally, the rule of tenths goes even further. You go both up and down when breaking your images into ten sections. Essentially, you’re breaking your images into 100 equal parts and composing your images based on those rules. They make a whole lot of sense for things like landscape and architecture, but can become more complicated when working with portraits, street photography etc.

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Before You Build A Photographic Portfolio, Figure Out Your Photographic Identity

Let’s get something absolutely out of the way here: your Instagram page isn’t necessarily your portfolio. A photographic portfolio is a body of work that helps let others know what kind of photographer you are. It’s a product you’re capable of delivering. For example, Toyota’s portfolio includes the Camry and their other cars. Peter Hurley’s portfolio includes headshots. Annie Leibovitz’s portfolio has portraits and editorial work. These are the products that we know they’re capable of producing. And in the same way, a photographer needs to tightly curate that portfolio, specialize (despite what some may tell you not to do, and they’re dead wrong), and put forward images and services that really make them standout from the rest.

But before you even go about doing this, you’ll need to figure out your photographic identity.

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Review: Tamron SP 70-200mm F2.8 Di VC USD G2 (Canon EF)

The Tamron SP 70-200mm F2.8 Di VC USD G2 is an entry point into one of the most popular telephoto zoom lens options out there–and it’s actually a damned fantastic one. Tamron has always created lenses that are high quality, affordable, and built pretty well.But with the Tamron SP 70-200mm F2.8 Di VC USD G2, they’re seriously taking the cake here. This lens offers weather sealing, the same top notch image quality that they’ve been pushing with the new SP lineup of lenses, and image stabilization to boot. So if you’re a portrait photographer, we’re already well aware that you’ve been eyeing a 70-200mm f2.8 lens of some sort.

And if you’re looking for an affordable option, then this is it.

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Film Review: Lomography Color Negative 100 (120 and 35mm Formats)

“It’s Kodak Gold,” I’m often told by Lomography reps about Lomography Color Negative 100. The film is one of the offerings from Lomography that is also a more affordable option at times in both 35mm and 120. Now, some folks may scoff at the idea of shooting Kodak Gold since for years, it was designed for being shot by just consumers. But in truth, it’s capable of delivering some seriously lovely colors. To that end, so too is Lomography Color Negative 100. At times, I genuinely feel like Lomography Color Negative 100 sometimes just intensifies whatever scene is just in front of you. But either way, if you’re looking for a low ISO alternative because you don’t like Kodak Ektar’s colors, then Lomography Color Negative 100 is a very viable option.

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Review: Tamron 10-24mm F3.5-4.5 Di II VC HLD (Canon EF-S)

The Tamron 10-24mm F3.5-4.5 Di II VC HLD is a lens that has been sorely needed for a while: it delivers a wide angle zoom option to APS-C DSLRs while putting in weather sealing, good autofocus performance, light weight, and overall great image quality. It’s a fantastic option for the photographer that has been looking for a way to shoot wide landscapes and cities with their APS-C DSLR while on vacation–or even just for fun. When you consider the weather sealing abilities built into the lens along with the relatively recent major improvements that Tamron has been making to their lenses, there is almost no reason to not consider the Tamron 10-24mm F3.5-4.5 Di II VC HLD lens.

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