When Shooting Portraits, Primarily Expose for the Skin Tones

One of the things a lot of people don’t understand about portraits is this: when you’re photographing a person they are the absolute bigger priority in the image. Even in environmental portraiture, their environment is important but the primary object is still the person you’re photographing. For that reason, a whole lot of portrait photographers will shoot in aperture priority because all they care about is the depth of field in the scene. But honestly, there’s a whole lot more to it than just that. You should be exposing your scene based on your subject’s skin tones as a priority and everything else should be secondary. Luckily, modern cameras are so good that you can do just that.

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Portrait Photography Tip: ALWAYS Ask for Consent To Touch Your Subject or Model

Today I’d like to talk about something that I feel is really important in the portrait photography world: and that’s consent. To start this off, let’s begin with the story of how I was taught to originally take portraits. Years ago in photojournalism class, my professor asked me to pose someone for a portrait using his camera. I started off giving her (my subject) an idea, and like every other awkward person who doesn’t know what to do, I went in to try to move the subject. Then my professor told me to stop. He told me to instead ask her to do something. So I came up with an idea and asked her to move her hair, etc.

“Do you know why I asked you to do that, Chris?” He asked.

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Portraiture: Various Imaging Formats Visually Compared

If you were to look at the various imaging formats currently available on the market, would you be able to easily tell the difference between the bunch? We’re out to prove a point in today’s posts: most people most likely would not be able to tell if a photo was shot on Micro Four Thirds, Medium format, or full frame. Just take a look at this sample gallery we’ve put together.

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A Real World Visual Demonstration of How Various Focal Lengths Work for Portraiture

Fact: lots of photographers don’t know how well a focal length will work for them when it comes to portraits. But don’t worry any longer, we’ve tested a number of them on full frame cameras when it comes to portraits and we’ve got just what you need.

We’ve gone through our reviews index to round up a number of images from various focal lengths to show you how they render portraits.

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How to Create Better Portraits for Instagram

Portraiture and gaming the system on Instagram isn’t always so simple. In fact, it’s pretty difficult. But photographers have been trying to cut through all the noise as best as they can for as long as the platform has been around. Getting better photos for Instagram starts in-camera, then with the editing process, and then with creating better content overall on the platform. So here’s what you should know.

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5 Tips on How to Choose a Location for Natural Light Portraiture

Shooting portraits in natural light can honestly sometimes be tougher than using a flash; but that’s considering you haven’t done any sort of scouting beforehand. However, natural light portraiture can be pretty simple if you can find a way to figure out the artistic vision parts, as the technical parts can be pretty simple too once you pay attention and carefully think about what you want.

Here are a bunch of tips on how to make the most of natural light for portraits.

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70mm IMAX Film vs 120 Film: What’s the Difference?

When it comes to a lot of photography, 35mm has been the standard for many years. In cinema, Super 35mm has been–and it’s around the size of APS-C digital. But what about larger formats? In photography, we’ve got 120 film and in cinema there’s IMAX. IMAX is considered large format in cinema and arguably it’s really beautiful. IMAX film is rated to be around 70mm in size; visually it’s really 65mm and 5mm are used for audio.

But how does it compare to 120 film?

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Question: Should You Enter Street Photography Competitions?

After purchasing our three video Street Photography Marketing workshop, photographer Michiel de Lange had further questions to ask like, “Should I enter a street photography competition?” Considering what happened recently with Sal Cincotta and judges at Shutterfest, it’s a very big problem that is in the industry which can mean that sometimes you get completely swindled out of your money.

But that doesn’t mean they’re all bad.

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