How One Man Is Striving to Keep the Look of Kodachrome 64 Alive

For more stories like this, please subscribe to The Phoblographer.

“Trawling through blogs and reviews, it because apparent that digital Kodachrome emulation is highly contentious,” says photographer Freddie Child-Villiers to The Phoblographer in an email interview. Freddie is the man behind the Kodachrome project–an attempt at keeping the look of Kodachrome alive and authentic. “…Some users want an accurate reproduction (Jamie Windsor’s being the best that I’ve tested). Others want a look of imagery one would expect from Magnum Photos or National Geographic pages; this is where The Kodachrome Project leans.” Like many folks, Freddie has done a ton of research on Kodachrome. And his project is truly starting to take off.

Continue reading…

My Wishlist: What I Want in the Fujifilm X Pro 3

I tend to skip a generation when it comes to cameras, so the Fujifilm X Pro 3 is next on my list.

I’ve never found it reasonable to constantly upgrade to the next generation of cameras that come out, and that’s why I’ve been holding out for the Fujifilm X Pro 3. I still own the Fujifilm X Pro 1, and to this day it is in my eyes one of the best cameras ever made in the past 10 years. The image quality still holds up as you can easily make the raw files look like film or have them be really high end. While Sony cameras are what I’d use for most of my work, Fujifilm is what I use for studio projects and for my hobby photography. I’ve always preferred the rangefinder style of cameras as they simply just conform better to my hands.

With all this said, here’s what I want out of the Fujifilm X Pro 3.

Continue reading…

The New Capture One Film Styles Pack Promises an Analog Look With Your Photos

The Capture One Film Styles Pack looks really fantastic if you like that style

Photographers who adore the look of analog film presets may greatly appreciate the new Capture One Film Styles pack. Capture One has these before–done by an outside company–but now they’re giving us official offerings. The Capture One Film Styles pack differ from something like RNI Films in that they’re not specific about what film emulsions they’re trying to emulate. But the pack contains around 33 color film simulations and 12 black and white offerings.

Continue reading…

The Yashica Y35 Officially Gets An Upgrade to an F2 Lens

They did it! The Yashica Y35 is getting an upgrade

Good news for backers of the Yashica Y35 camera–it’s getting a lens upgrade. The new lens is something that the company announced would be possible after hitting a specific stretch goal and on top of that they’re adding in what they’re calling a 4G lens. We’re not exactly sure what that means and the comments on the update shows equal amounts of confusion as well.

At this point, if you were complaining about the camera, there really is less reasons to do so now–especially at the stupid low price point.

Continue reading…

Let’s Play a Game: Film or Digital? A Fujifilm Film Emulsion vs Digital Simulation Blind Comparison

Lots of photographers believe that the Fujifilm film simulations on their cameras really look like film. But is that true? To put this to the test, we're having a bit of fun before the weekend hits. This is a blind taste test, can you tell which images were shot with film and which ones were shot digitally?

Look through each section and then check out the answers towards the end.

Continue reading…

How Closely Does Fujifilm Acros Compare To the Digital Film Simulation?

This is a syndicated blog post from our premium publication La Noir Image. Subscribe for as little as $15 for access and free presets; $40/year gets you all that and a tutorial video coming soon; $100/year gets this and a portfolio critique with Chris.

One question that lots of photographers who have shot film wonder about is how closely Fujifilm’s film simulations closely mimic the look of film. Considering how Fujifilm created Acros, it would make a whole lot of sense that their digital simulation would be the closest thing possible to the film, right? Well, that depends on a number of different situations.Fujifilm Neopan Acros can take on different looks based on how you shot it and how you develop it. For example, Rodinal may make it look one way vs another developer. Then you’ll need to consider how the images were obviously shot, how you’re lighting them, etc. To get a better idea though, we’ve been using Acros 100 in a number of situations plus we looked at one digital preset to see how it performed vs Fujifilm’s option.

Continue reading…

How Closely Does Fujifilm Acros Compare To the Digital Film Simulation?

One question that lots of photographers who have shot film wonder about is how closely Fujifilm’s film simulations closely mimic the look of film. Considering how Fujifilm created Acros, it would make a whole lot of sense that their digital simulation would be the closest thing possible to the film, right? Well, that depends on a number of different situations.Fujifilm Neopan Acros can take on different looks based on how you shot it and how you develop it. For example, Rodinal may make it look one way vs another developer. Then you’ll need to consider how the images were obviously shot, how you’re lighting them, etc. To get a better idea though, we’ve been using Acros 100 in a number of situations plus we looked at one digital preset to see how it performed vs Fujifilm’s option.

Acros 100: Landscapes

Fujifilm GFX 50S Acros Simulation

The above photo was shot with the new Fujifilm GFX 50S. The Acros simulation was shot and later on in Lightroom I ensured that that camera profile was applied. In this photo, there are no Graduated ND filters applied.

Minolta a7 Sony 35mm f1.4 Acros 100.

Lomography developed the images above and below from Fujifilm Acros 100 shot at and developed for 100. They’re shot on 35mm film look pretty close but not totally so. Still though, it’s tough to state that this isn’t the closest thing to Acros film. Fujifilm does a fantastic job with their emulsion rendition but another factor could also surely be the lenses. The new 110mm f4 from Fujifilm is pretty contrasty and the optics are far newer than the Sony A mount lens. With that said, it’s a bit hard to compare seeing that Fujifilm doesn’t make a full frame 35mm sensor and their medium format camera isn’t even 645.

Minolta a7 Sony 35mm f1.4 Acros 100.

Acros 100: Studio Portraits

Fujifilm Acros 100

In the studio is where I feel the comparison between Fujifilm Acros 100 and the GFX 50s became more interesting. In a studio setting, you’re truly making your own lighting. Often times a photographer will not care about any sort of ambient lighting because it’s all supplemented by a flash. To that end, the images are typically more high contrast depending on how the photographer lit them. The image above and below were lit in the exact same ways.

Fujifilm GFX 50S Acros

What you’ll see is that both images are very sharp. Acros 100, the emulsion proper, has a bit of grain but not really. The Fujifilm GFX 50S though looks very clean and digital. However, the 6×9 format photo also looks very clean.

Digital Presets vs Fujifilm’s Emulsions Simulation

X100F Acros Simulation

Now lastly, we’re looking at how the Acros camera simulation compares to something like Capture One Film styles. It’s close, but the shadows in the Capture One Film Styles simulation are deeper–perhaps designed to make the film look more high contrast in the lighting type.

Capture One Film Style Acros Simulation