The Intrepid 4×5 Enlarger Lets You Print and Scan 35mm, 120, and 4×5 Films

The Intrepid 4×5 Enlarger would be a great addition to your darkroom for printing and scanning 35mm, 120, and 4×5 negatives if you also happen to already have a 4×5 camera.

Dreaming of setting up the darkroom of your dreams? If you already have a 4×5 camera, you could just be a step closer to it. After two years of designing and testing, The Intrepid Camera Co. has recently unveiled a new DIY photography tool to add to your darkroom checklist. The Intrepid Enlarger is a nifty contraption that attaches to any 4×5 camera just like a film holder, and allows you to scan and make prints not only from 4×5 film, but also 35mm and 120 as well.

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Curious Looking Film Digitizer Promises to Help Scan Your Negatives Better Than a Scanner

Calling all film photographers: Looking for an alternate way to scan your negatives? Check this gadget out.

For serious film photographers, getting a proper film scanner is just as important as getting the right gear. It’s an investment (a pretty expensive one at that) but if you don’t do your research properly you might end up just throwing your money away on a model that produces substandard results.

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Kodak’s New SCANZA Film Scanner Looks Like an Upgraded Wolverine F2D

The new Kodak SCANZA Digital Film Scanner is a lot like the Wolverine F2D but with a few updates.

If you shoot film and you’re willing to look past the shady moves that Kodak pulled off at the 2018 CES, you might want to keep reading. There’s no denying that the company has been strong on their film game in recent years, so it makes sense that they had a bunch of film photography stuff at their CES booth. One of these was the SCANZA Digital Film Scanner, a 14/22 Megapixel scanner that can take 35mm, 126, 110, Super 8, and 8mm film negatives and slides.

If the SCANZA looks familiar to you, it’s most likely because it looks and works a lot like the Wolverine F2D. We reviewed the Wolverine last year and found that, while the quality isn’t comparable to that of pricier, pro-level scanners, it’s not so shabby either. We imagine Kodak’s new film scanner to produce the same quality of scans as the Wolverine.

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The New Nikon ES-2 Film Digitizing Adapter Will Make Film Scanning So Much Easier

In addition to the new Nikon D850 DSLR, the Nikon ES-2 Film Digitizing Adapter is making its debut too. What’s that? Film? Yes. By using this adapter with Nikkor macro lenses and a flash, you can get high resolution scans of your 35mm negative or slide film images. When you’re using the Nikon D850, the camera will work to convert the images in-camera to positives. Considering the world’s rise in analog film photography and Nikon’s history in the film industry, it makes a whole lot of sense and is a really nice move to see Nikon doing this.

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Review: Wolverine F2D Mighty 20MP 7-in-1 Film to Digital Converter

With analog film photography on the rise, there is obviously the need and want for many city dwelling photographers with little room in apartments to want to scan their photos; and that’s where the Wolverine F2D Mighty 20MP 7-in-1 Film to Digital Converter comes into play. No, it’s not a drum scanner. And it’s surely not one of those scanners well over $1,000. But it’s also not supposed to be. This film scanner scans 110 film, super 8 film, and 35mm negative and slide film in addition to black and white. For only Check on Amazon though, you really can’t complain about the quality.

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First Impressions: Helmut Film Scanning App (Beta)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer First Impressions Helmut (1 of 8)ISO 40001-125 sec at f - 1.0

Today, Helmut launched as a free download in the Android store in its Beta production phase. Helmut is a new app that is touted as being a great way to scan your old film images and has already won an award. To take the best advantage of this app, it is highly recommended that one uses a lightbox. However, there have been DIY hacks involving Macro lenses and flashes before. For this quick test, we used an iPad Mini and a MacBook Pro Retina display.


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