Do We Really Need More New APS-C DSLR Cameras?

canon aps-c cameras
The camera sounds interesting, but surely it’s time to say goodbye to the APS-C DSLR. 

A recent report has suggested that Canon may be making a new APS-C DSLR that will combine two of their popular APS-C based cameras into one new shiny body. While the camera certainly sounds interesting, surely there has to be a point in time when Canon and others lay the APS-C DSLR to rest. Mirrorless cameras, especially in the flavor of APS-C have taken over the APS-C market, and most consumers (and many professionals) are picking Mirrorless APS-C cameras over DSLRs. 

The report that was recently published on Canon Watch, suggests that instead of making a new 90D and a 7D Mk III, Canon may well combine both together into one APS-C DSLR that takes the best from both models and joins them together in matrimony. An APS-C DSLR that would have a full tilting, flippy screen, Dual Pixel AF from the EOS 80D, and a strong, rugged, weather sealed body, with the high burst rate from the 7D Mk II sure sounds good–but honestly, making this camera as anything other than a Mirrorless camera that can compete with offerings from Fujifilm and Sony would surely leave egg on the faces of Canon once again.

APS-C DSLR

Current offerings from Canon in the Mirrorless world have left a lot to be desired. It’s almost as if they are afraid to really leave DSLRs behind. It’s this fear that has led Canon on the path to disappointment after disappointment. The once proud industry leader needs to embrace Mirrorless technology, and they need to stop putting out half measures to try and appease the Canon faithful who are yearning for more.

“An APS-C based Mirrorless camera from Canon that can take on the likes of the X-T3, and the offerings from Sony is exactly what they need to get their fans excited once again.”

APS-C DSLR cameras are dying a rather quick death now. Sony and Fujifilm have taken this market segment by storm with their A6xx series, and the X-T series of APS-C Mirrorless cameras. Meanwhile aging APS-C DSLR cameras are left to gather dust on shelves in stores all over the world, while Mirrorless cameras can hardly be kept in stock.

Consumers, hobbyists, and pros have all flocked to APS-C offerings from Sony and Fujifilm (myself included), and if Canon wants to stop hemorrhaging the largest part of their customer base they need to come up with something special; I don’t know, something like a Mirrorless APS-C based camera with insane video and stills capabilities that could take on say the Fujifilm X-T3? Yes. That might just work. A hybrid, Mirrorless 80D and 7D Mk II combined into a Mirrorless camera would be marvelous.

“Current offerings from Canon in the Mirrorless world have left a lot to be desired. It’s almost as if they are afraid to really leave DSLR’s behind.”

The idea of a Canon APS-C monster that combines incredible video performance, the ability to capture exceptional stills, and that has high burst rates for sports, all inside a small, tough weather sealed body has me (and i’m sure countless others) quite excited. Canon need to be careful though. If they release this camera, and it’s in the form of an APS-C DSLR, it will be dead on arrival. Mirrorless is the way forward, and while many may not like to admit it, DSLRs are on the way out. They may still be around for a little while, but honestly, if companies think they can hold on to past glories with new DSLR’s they are destined to fail.

An APS-C based Mirrorless camera from Canon that can take on the likes of the X-T3, and the Sony a6400 is exactly what they need to get their fans excited once again. Going forward they can transition other lines such as the Rebel series into low cost, Mirrorless based APS-C cameras too. Doing this would surely change their outlook on how the camera market looks to them. The APS-C DSLR is done, it’s finished, it’s dead, and a new APS-C DSLR from any manufacturer at this point would be a major misstep. Let’s hope Canon and others embrace Mirrorless technology and put APS-C DSLR cameras to rest.

How do you feel about APS-C DSLR cameras? Do you think their time is up thanks to affordable APS-C Mirrorless options from Fujifilm, Sony, and others? Let us know in the comment section below.