Portraiture: Various Imaging Formats Visually Compared

If you were to look at the various imaging formats currently available on the market, would you be able to easily tell the difference between the bunch? We’re out to prove a point in today’s posts: most people most likely would not be able to tell if a photo was shot on Micro Four Thirds, Medium format, or full frame. Just take a look at this sample gallery we’ve put together.

Micro Four Thirds

Pen F with Voigtlande 17.5mm f0.95

Olympus Pen F and Voigtlander 17.5mm f0.95

Model: Natalie Margiotta


Pro Tip: Most modern lenses can handle backlighting with ease. Do it, it gives portrait subjects a beautiful glow.

Fujifilm 90mm f2

To make a man look more elegant, it’s not only all about the attire but it’s also about the specific pose. Have him shift his weight depending on which shoulder is the higher one. The lower shoulder should be bright forward more and the head should be tilted slightly.

35mm Full Frame

Fernando’s skin tone is associated with orange, his shirt is blue and the trees are green.

Fujifilm G Format

Atlantic, Portrait

California, Portrait

Alaska, Portrait

645 Digital

Model: Natalie Margiotta

645 Film

Pro Tip: This image was shot with Kodak Portra 400, which isn’t a slide film. But if you really want to start working with film, start shooting with your camera set to the daylight white balance so that you gain a familiarity with the various types of lighting scenarios and how they’ll affect your scene.

This image was shot with Kodak Portra 400 on a Bronica ETRS: which means that it was done in the 645 format.

Pro Tip: the latest emulsions of Kodak Portra were designed to be scanned. We recommend Portra 400 more than almost anything else out there.

6×7 Film

6×9 Film

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