Six Great Cameras That Won’t Get Checked at a Concert

Sony_RX1-3

Heading into a concert? We’ve got good news and bad news for you.

Let’s start with the good news: you’re about to see what will hopefully be an awesome show.

The bad news: the venue may not let your pro-grade camera in. In fact, even as long as it looks pro grade, you’ll need to check it. So for that reason, you’ll need something a bit more low-profile that will fool the guards when they check your bag. The only way to do that is to not have such a serious looking piece of kit on you, but still having something comparable to the cameras that you may use.

Here are a list of cameras that won’t get checked at a concert.

Fujifilm X30

Fujifilm X30As of the publishing of this post, we’ve published our Fujifilm X30 review. We indeed tested it at a concert–and not only did it get through the doors with no problems but it also did a great job. With a 28-112mm f2-2.8 zoom lens and a 1/2″ sensor at its heart, we found the X30 to be quite excellent. What we were most amazed by is its high ISO abilities; which are bound to be used at concerts.

This camera is one that we recommend mostly for its street photography uses, but considering how excellent the autofocusing is, you may want to think twice. On top of that, we were also stupified by how much detail can be pulled from the RAWs. The fact that a 1/2″ sensor means that you probably won’t be stopped down very much due to the way that depth of field works; and that you’re bound to have more than enough of your scene in focus when shooting.

We recommend getting up close and personal with this camera if you can. But you probably won’t be able to, so at least try to get a better seat if at all possible.

Read the review.

Editor’s Note: we totally believe that both the X100s and X100T could also do a fantastic job, but we haven’t reviewed the X100T as of the publishing of this article. Nor have we had a lot of time to play with one.

Buy Now: Amazon

Sony Rx100 Mk III

Sony Rx100 Mk III

 

Sony’s Rx100 Mk III houses a larger sensor than the Fujifilm X30–in fact the 1 inch sensor at its heart is very capable. At its widest focal length, the lens opens up to f1.8 while it goes down to f2.8 when zoomed in all the way.

One of the biggest upgrades on the Rx100 Mk III over its predecessors is the inclusion of an EVF that pops up if the user chooses to utilize it while shooting. It is also one of the various ways of powering up the camera for use.

So why would this camera be so great for concerts? The small sensor size means that at f1.8 you’ll be getting lots of the scene in focus as opposed to using a full frame camera. The 1 inch sensor in this camera also delivers incredible high ISO results that are very detailed. We put it against the Canon G1X Mk II and while the latter won out, the Sony didn’t go down without a very tough fight.

Read the review.

Buy Now: Amazon

Sony RX1

Sony RX1

As one of two point and shoots on the market with a full frame sensor at its heart, the RX1 it an absolute no-brainer when it comes to selections for concerts. With a fully working aperture ring around a 35mm f2 Zeiss lens and a 24MP full frame sensor, you can capture images at higher ISOs than any other camera on this list with even cleaner results. In fact, the 35mm field of view can be perfect for shooting concerts if you’re up front.

But for what it’s worth, consider the fact that a full frame sensor will have less of an area in focus at a given aperture compared to others on this list. The reason for this has to do with depth of field. In real life practice, that can mean that you have more out of focus images.

For that reason, we recommend this camera only to those that have been shooting for years and are bold enough to call themselves experts.

And just think: the security at the concerts will have no idea.

Read the review.

Buy Now: Amazon

Canon G1X Mk II

Canon G1X Mk II

What happens when you take one of the most traditional companies in the camera industry and get something completely untraditional from them? You get the G1X Mk II.

Canon’s G1X Mk II is so unorthodox because of its sensor size: which is slightly larger than Micro Four Thirds sensors. Yes, this camera indeed has a larger sensor than some interchangeable lens cameras. With a wide angle lens that opens up to f2, you’ll want to get up close and personal while shooting concerts.

The camera has lots of nice controls like a ring around lens to control exposure parameters and otherwise other dials to do similar functions. Plus it has a touch screen and a tilting LCD screen.

But more than any other camera on this list, we believe that the Canon G1X Mk II has the best color rendition.

Read the review.

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Panasonic LX100

Panasonic LX100

We’re still waiting on our Panasonic LX100 unit, but the camera so far seems to show lots and lots of promise. Take the GX7’s sensor, a Leica lens specifically developed for said sensor, an EVF, retro control dials and you’ve got a camera that many Micro Four Thirds fans have been waiting for for many years.

Again though, we haven’t finished our review of the camera as of the publishing of this piece.

Read the preview.

Buy Now: Amazon