Three Lenses Every Beginning Canon DSLR User Needs

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So now you’re a Canon DSLR owner. Congrats; you’ve made a great decision by joining up with one of the most comprehensive and well supported camera systems out there. Not only will get you some truly spectacular image quality, but you’ll also be rewarded with loads of great features to make image taking an even better experience.

But now that you’re a DSLR owner: know that your image quality mostly comes from your lenses. In fact, your lenses can indeed be more important than your camera. And with that in mind, consider these favorites of ours.


Canon 50mm f1.8

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The nifty 50 is the lens that everyone (including us) recommend that you spring for from the start. If you’ve already got one, good. If you don’t, then this is the one you’ll need. First off, it’s dirt cheap and can be had for sometimes under $100. This is partially due to its older construction and plastic body.

So why is it such a great lens. Well to begin with, you’ll get a wide open f1.8 aperture (f-stop.) This will let you achieve images with bokeh–which is that creamy, blurry background that you’ve been dreaming of. When the lens is opened up to f1.8, you can also shoot easily in low light without a flash.

This lens performs at its sharpest at around f4, but you get the best balance of subjects being in focus and bokeh blur at f2.8. To really get the most out of this lens, you’ll want to set your camera to manual mode instead of aperture priority or automatic. The reason for this is because then you’ll be able to experiment with the full range of exposures that a lens like this allows you to have.

Just also remember that if you put this lens on an APS-C sensor DSLR, it will give you the field of view of an 80mm lens. Don’t know what we’re talking about? If you own a Rebel, a 70D (or double digit number with a D) or a 7D, then you’ve got a camera with an APS-C sensor and therefore the camera doesn’t use the full capabilities of the lens.

In the long run though, you’ll probably either sell this lens or stick with it forever.

Check out our review here.

Buy Now: Adorama | Amazon | B&H Photo

Pro Tip: When you're shooting with a lens wide open, you'll get your most accurate performance when you manually select your focusing point. Consult your camera's manual on how to do just that; but with Canon cameras in general it means pressing a button and then the directional buttons on the back of the camera.

Pro Tip: When you’re shooting with a lens wide open, you’ll get your most accurate performance when you manually select your focusing point. Consult your camera’s manual on how to do just that; but with Canon cameras in general it means pressing a button and then the directional buttons on the back of the camera.

Sigma 30mm f1.4 II (New Version)

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If you’re looking for a true 50mm field of view on an APS-C camera, then you’re going to want this lens. Sigma’s 30mm f1.4 is designed to be used with APS-C sensor cameras like a Rebel to give off a near equivalent field of view of a 50mm lens. But what we were pleasantly surprised to find is that the lens also works damned well on a full frame camera.

By that, we mean that there is barely any bothersome vignetting and it also performs very sharply. However, it is sharpest nearest to the center and then it start to taper off near the corner. The reason for this is most likely for the fact that it wasn’t designed to be used with a full frame camera.

Sigma’s 30mm f1.4 also feels quite nice in your hand–almost like a small piece of fruit. The image quality it can deliver is contrasty, sharp, and almost devoid of flaws. If you really, really, want to pixel peep though you’ll find some purple fringing.

But in all honesty, that means nothing when it comes to your photo being viewed as a whole.

Check out our review here.

Buy Now: Adorama | Amazon | B&H Photo

Tokina 12-28mm f4 II

969884You know that longing feeling that you have for shooting landscapes and stuff? Well if you want to do it with a APS-C camera, then Tokina’s 12-28mm f4 lens is an excellent option. The build quality is pretty darned good; but what you’ll be floored by is the sharp image quality corner to corner.

So who specifically is this lens for? If you’re a traveller going from city to city wanting to shoot architecture, street photographers wanting a zoom, or essentially anyone wanting to shoot wide no matter what will want this lens.

As the only zoom on this list, it might also be the lens that you get addicted to due to its versatility and the image quality that we can’t sing praises of enough.

Check out our review here.

Buy Now: Adorama | Amazon | B&H Photo

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