50mm vs 35mm Lenses: a Visual Guide for Portrait Photography

With wider angle lenses becoming better and better, photographers are bound to ask the question of 50mm vs 35mm lenses and how they relate to portraiture. For years now, it was never recommended that photographers use something like a 35mm or a 50mm lenses. In fact, the shortest focal length recommended was an 85mm–to some degree that’s still true. But in many situations, a 35mm and 50mm lens can be awesome. Photographers who perhaps come from a street background or prefer to work physically closer to their subjects may like the 50mm and 35mm lens options. So in this post, we’re going to explore why you’d choose one over the other.

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The ReEdit: Editing Skin Tones and Getting More Control in Capture One

In today’s episode of The ReEdit, I decided to go back into my portfolio of hard drives to a shoot from 2013. This session was done with a fan favorite: Grace. I was reviewing a Profoto light and the images, even today, hold up. First off, it was done with what’s an old camera by today’s standards, the Canon 5D Mk II. However, when using it with the Sigma 35mm f1.4 Art lens combined with the Profoto light I’m able to get sharpness that rivals modern cameras and lenses. This proves more than anything that your lighting is really what matters. Then I go into the editing process.

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Review: Canon 24-105mm f4 L IS USM II (Canon EF Mount)

Canon has always been a company that is a bit slower to change things, and so when the Canon 24-105mm f4 L IS USM II was announced, I was pleased to see that they did a number to fix many issues with the previous lens. With that said though, years have passed now and the Canon 24-105mm f4 L IS USM II more or less looks like every other option on the market. Some of the new welcome additions are the prevention of lens creep incorporated into the design, a lock to keep the lens locked in at 24mm, better weather sealing, faster autofocus, and less issues with image quality. For years, the previous version of the lens was my bread and butter option. While many photographers reach for the 24-70mm f2.8 lenses, I tend to go for the longer focal range option.

For only $1,099 you’re getting one of the best bang for your buck L lenses that Canon offers. At a more expensive price point than Sigma’s 24-105mm f4 DG OS HSM, you’re paying for weather sealing and the ability to lock the lens at 24mm to prevent it from extending when in your camera bag. that and less contrast in the images. But the Canon 24-105mm f4 L IS USM II’s main strength is in the versatility it offers the photographer.

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What Makes The 35mm Focal Length Special, And Why You Should Use It

We talk a lot about various lenses for new announcements, recommendations, and other reasons. But what we don’t often touch on is the focal lengths themselves, the traits most lenses of that length share and why a photographer would want to use a given focal length. So, we are going to be doing a little series on various popular focal lengths, describing their traits, what they are known for and why you may want to make use of them in your kit. Today we start with our first, the 35mm focal length. Continue reading…

What Makes a 50mm Lens So Special, and Why You Should Use It?

As we mentioned in our 35mm post, we are going to be taking a look at various focal lengths, describing what makes them unique from the others and for what reasons you may want to use them in your kit. 35mm was a great place to start, but today we are moving on to the 50mm lens. It is one of the most popular and most common lenses there is, and that is for a reason, and here is why. Continue reading…

How To Choose The Best 35mm Lens For You

The 35mm focal length is popular for all sorts of photography niches, from weddings to boudoir to wildlife to landscapes. This makes your choice of 35mm lens extra important because you are likely intending to use it in multiple scenarios. You don’t want to spend more money than you need to, and certainly, don’t want to waste money by having to buy another lens should you skimp out too much. So in this post, we are going to talk about things to consider and how to choose the best 35mm lens for you. Continue reading…

Review: Canon EOS M6 (Canon EF-M Mount)

If you were to look at the mirrorless camera world, it would appear that Canon, with the Canon M6, is an entry into the world where they’re still trying to find themselves. To some, they could look like an experimental 20 something trying in vain to get their life together. Yet somehow or another, I genuinely never thought that I’d like the Canon M6. The camera isn’t designed to be the highest end mirrorless camera from Canon, yet somehow or another it’s a camera that surely deserves respect in some ways and groans of frustration at the fact that Canon has gotten this camera almost perfectly right yet it feels like they were purposely holding themselves back. The Canon M6 has at its heart a 24MP APS-C sensor which is smaller than all the other options out there from Fujifilm, Sony, Pentax, Sigma–and let’s be honest because they’re all more or less made by Sony. Designed for the enthusiast, the Canon M6 has some very tough competition from the entire camera world. Yet somehow or another, this truly is a camera that you need to personally experience to understand.

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Review: Sigma 135mm f1.8 DG HSM Art (Canon EF)

If you’re a fan of the Sigma 85mm f1.4 Art lens, then you’re bound to fall head over heels for the Sigma 135mm f1.8 DG HSM Art lens. When it comes to portrait lenses, photographers are typically tied to the 85mm and 135mm focal lengths: and so that makes this latest decision even harder. Both are good. In fact, both are fantastic. But with the new Sigma 135mm f1.8 Art lens, you get what seems like a smaller and lighter lens though surely longer. Plus it has weather sealing and a classic quality about it with just a bit less contrast than many of the other Sigma Art lenses.

But is it the right portrait lens for you?

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