Shooting with the Fujifilm GFX 50S: Extended Thoughts and Sample Images

The Fujifilm GFX 50S has been in for review for a few days now and I’m sort of wrapping my head around how to test it correctly. That’s kind of tough to explain for many reasons. You see, Fujifilm sent me the camera along with the 63mm f2.8 and the 120mm f4 lenses–both primes which are great for general work, portraiture, and the mainstay of most medium format photographers out there. Zooms are often tough to work with, but in some ways I feel like Fujifilm is genuinely trying to redefine the way people work with medium format cameras, lenses, and sensors.

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Tougher Than You Think: How to Shoot in a Studio Style With Film

Shooting in a studio or studio style with film changes a lot more of the photography game than you’d think. You see, there’s no taking a photo, chimping, and saying you like the image or not. You have to get it right the first time around. There’s also a major difference in what can be done with color correction and a lot more. But the biggest thing is the fact that you and your subject will have a much greater sense of connection due to how you need to communicate a whole lot more.

In this post, we’re going to focus a bit more on the technical details.

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How to Make the Most of One Light in a Portrait Studio

Working with a portrait subject in the studio first and foremost requires you to stop thinking about them necessarily as your subject and instead more as your collaborator. Now don’t get me wrong, you’re essentially going to be the conductor of the orchestra most of the time so to speak–but you need to think about people in a different way. You also don’t need the fanciest cameras, lighting, etc to make this work.

In fact, very soon we’ve got a special workshop dedicated to doing just this with Instax Wide film hosted at the Lomography Gallery Store in NYC. But if you’re interested in getting a sneak peak of what’s going to be taught, read on.

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Marissa Alden’s Beautiful Fashion Portraiture Work

All images by Marissa Alden. Used with permission. 

Fashion photography requires an abundant flowing of fresh ideas and inspiration to create unique and creative results. Marrisa Alden is a passionate photographer based in Melbourne, Australia who ventured into the world of fashion and portraiture after high school.

Marissa told us she started photography at the tender age of 15 when she took photo journalism as a class at school. She then moved on to exploring landscape and surrealism photography which have become a part of her school portfolio. Upon graduation, she delved into fashion and beauty photography and has never looked back since. She fell in love with the creative side of fashion which allowed her to combine her interests in art, styling, beauty, photography, and design. After all, fashion photography is all about pulling the elements of the clothes and the beauty of the model and the scene together.  Continue reading…

In the Studio: Creating Professional Photos With the Instax Wide Film

If you’re one of those people that has always wanted to create a professional looking image with Instant Film, then you’ve come to the right place. Is it difficult? Not really; but it will surely require you to think in a different way.

On January 15th, The Phoblographer’s Chris Gampat will take you into the studio to create Instant Photos that look like they were professionally shot while still retaining that lo-fi charm that everyone loves. You’ll learn about posing for a portrait, idea generation, lighting, light modifiers, and so much more.

You can find out more on our EventBrite page for the event.

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Evelyn Bencicova Captures Her Subject’s True Selves In Truthness

All Images By Evelyn Bencicova. Used Under A Creative Commons License

There are many photographers who can take a technically perfect picture, with stellar lighting and optimal composition. But the mark of a true professional, of someone who has earned their stripes, is the ability to pull emotion from their subjects, the ability to have their subjects so comfortable that they open themselves up to the photographer, sharing their true selves. Continue reading…