Review (In Progress): Sony 70-200mm f2.8 OSS G Master (Full Frame E Mount)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony 70-200mm f2.8 G Master lens product images review (1 of 13)ISO 4001-80 sec at f - 2.8

When you consider a camera system, one of the most important lenses to look out for is a 70-200mm equivalent–and Sony has been working on delivering that in the form of the Sony 70-200mm f2.8 OSS G Master lens for full frame E mount cameras. With weather sealing, a white body, 18 groups with 23 lens elements, and a constant f2.8 aperture throughout the zoom range coupled with a small size overall–there is a lot of love about this lens.

Editor’s Note: In conjunction with the changes we’ve been doing here on the site, we’re once again changing our review format. First impressions reviews will be completely replaced with a fuller and fuller review that will be updated overtime. Readers will be given notifications on when the full review is complete. Each section will also be rated with stars and an overall cumulative rating. Additionally, comparisons will be made. If parts seem incomplete it’s because they’re still being worked on

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Red Bull Illume Sneak Peek Offers Glimpse of the World’s Best Action Sport Photography

© Jean Baptiste Liautard / Red Bull Illume

All images used with permission from Red Bull. Lead image by Jean Baptiste Liautard.

Red Bull Illume is one of the world’s top photography contests for the action sports and adventure specialized photographers out there. This is the fourth iteration of this contest, which convenes every three years and started back in 2007, in which thousands of the world’s top action and adventure sports photographers submit their work to the panel of 50 photo editors to be judged. Out of this year’s 34,624 entries from 5,645 photographers located in 120 countries,  11 Category prize winners and 1 Grand Prize winner will be announced. Continue reading…

How to Light a Basketball Court For the Big Game

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Editor’s note, we contacted Patrick to ask for permission to share an image or two. We will update if he responds.

If you know anything about lighting, you’re probably every aware that some of the photos you see in sports are very well lit–especially with basketball. Ever wonder how that’s done? Well photographer Patrick Murphy-Racey created a video on just how: and trust us, it isn’t simple. In fact, it’s quite a production and he shows off that it requires a photographer to get there very early ahead of the game to set up. In fact, Patrick says that you should go the day before if possible.

In the video after the jump, he shows you how to safely install a 4- head Dynalite Arena System into a large, NBA sized arena. The packs used in this video are the AP1600 and they’re used with AH4000 heads, AR0040 reflectors and Avenger clamps. The sync is setup and secured so that all the lights will fire at once.

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95% Dumb Luck: Photographing Baseball with Jim Bryant

Seattle Mariners' Adrian Beltre, right, breaks up a double play attempt by Detroit Tigers' second baseman Placido Polanco in the seventh inning of Major League Baseball game in Seattle on Sunday, July 6, 2008. ©2008. Jim Bryant Photo. All Rights Reserved

Seattle Mariners’ Adrian Beltre, right, breaks up a double play attempt by Detroit Tigers’ second baseman Placido Polanco in the seventh inning of Major League Baseball game in Seattle on Sunday, July 6, 2008. ©2008. Jim Bryant Photo. All Rights Reserved

All images by Jim Bryant. Used with permission.[email protected]://

Photographer Jim Bryant has been shooting sports for longer than many of us have even been alive, and he believes that good baseball photography is 5% being there and 95% dumb luck. Jim, who is well into his 60s, still has perfect 20/20 vision and is typically assigned to photograph the Mariners.

Originally from Columbus, Georgia Jim first got into photography when he would watch his stepfather develop and contact print his 4 x 5 Speed graphic negatives in the kitchen of their home. Today, he totes around three cameras and some very big glass. His job typically entails getting the shots and transmitting the images to the wire services quickly.


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Dhani Borges: High Impact Athletic Portraits

Fotografia de Basquete de Rua da LIIBRA por dhani b 2

All images by Dhani Borges. Used with permission.

“…as I flipped through the magazine I thought, “I could do this, taking skate photos is easy!”, if only I knew how hard it is.” says photographer Dhani Borges about how he got into photography. Dhani’s love of skating stuck with him as he moved from Vancouver to Brazil.

As a working photographer since 2000, he’s worked on creating better photos of athletes that have more of an impact. This started with skating and believe it or not, Dhani used to hate taking portraits. “Currently I find myself shooting for companies that organize marathons and other running related events, food photography, architecture work and major construction projects.” says Dhani.


More than anything though, Dhani proves what’s capable with minimal gear and a great creative vision.

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The BOOMR is a Camera Strap With a Bungee System


It’s very possible that camera straps with a gargantuan lens can be very uncomfortable depending on what strap you’re using and its available padding. This is one of the reasons why some photographers use sling straps, and a new Kickstarter is trying to provide a better solution. It’s called the BOOMR, and it essentially puts your camera on a coiled bungee system around your chest. And yes, it’s an actual bungee. The idea is to provide both padding to your chest/shoulder/neck while using the bungee system to semi-suspend the camera and ensure comfort.

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Getty Photographer Adam Pretty Gives Tips for Sports Photography

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Screenshot taken from the video

Getty Images recently profiled photographer Adam Pretty in a video asking him about his job and tips for sports shooters. Adam says that sports photography is all about pre-visualization. What that means is basically being able to predict a moment that is coming before it comes. This requires lots of anticipation and a very fast shutter frame rate of course too! He also talks about his creative process and how he goes about trying to get different vantage points to create more visually interesting photographs.

One of the coolest things that he talks about is shooting his friend rock climbing with a large format camera and slowing down to get very precise and beautiful images.

The video is after the jump.

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