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Camera FV-5

When Nikon announced the update to their 300mm f4 earlier this year, the updates seemed very intriguing considering the way that they designed the lens. It features a special fresnel design that can keep the size down quite a bit, and in doing that they developed a lens that can easily fit into a camera bag while attached to your camera. That’s important for bird photographers, landscape photographers wildlife shooters, sports shooters, and those that like photographing random things and have lots of money to burn.

The 300mm f4E PR EF VR lens from Nikon has 9 aperture blades, 16 elements in 10 groups, and can focus as close as 4.6 feet. With the price tag coming in at just under $2,000, you’re still getting a pretty good deal, but that’s still quite expensive overall.

One thing’s for sure though: they sure didn’t skimp on the quality.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 16-55mm f2.8 WR review Graham's images (16 of 19)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 2.8

It’s extremely common for most photographers these days to simply just hold down a shutter button and hope that they get the right shot. But in the end, that just gives you loads and loads of extra images that you don’t necessarily need and you’ll end up with less keepers than you’d like. Fixing that problem means that you need to think about (in the brief window of time) the end result. And for that, you need to think about what you possibly see in a scene and how you can quickly capture it to ensure that you deliver a result that your mind’s eye saw.

Sounds really, really tough to do, right? It’s not that bad if you make the job easier for yourself by doing things like shooting in aperture priority where you have a bit of control over the image or you have an autofocus point already pre-selected for the scene. Automation of some of the settings lets you get to that end game image that you have in your head and greatly improves your chances of actually getting it.

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Photoblog04

All images by Damian Strohmeyer. Used with permission.

Damian Strohmeyer is a Boston based sports photographer that has been shooting for wires and magazines for many years. Like many of the more seasoned veterans, he started out at a small paper and spent hours slaving away in darkrooms. Sports was always in his blood as he played in high school and loved it. This love of sports eventually gave way to his first chance to shoot the Super Bowl in 1987.

Like any photographer that’s been doing this for years, Damian has adapted to the digital world and marketing techniques along with honing his people skills to ensure that he networks effectively to find his next gig.

We talked to Damian about shooting the Super Bowl, sports photography, and the times that he missed the shot–just in time before Super Bowl Sunday.

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julius motal the phoblographer sports illustrated

This week’s cover.

In a depressing move, Sports Illustrated laid off its last six staff photographers, reducing the photography department to the director of photography. According to an NPPA post, the move was a consequence of internal restructuring and economic constraints. So, like their forebears at the Chicago Sun-Times, they axed the last six people who knew their way around a camera.

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julius motal the phoblographer sony 70-200mm f2.8 G product image-6

I don’t always handle big lenses, but when I do, it’s the Sony 70-200mm f2.8 G SSM II (or it’s equivalent across camera systems). I’ve been a Sony shooter for a long time, but the closest I ever got to this lens was Minolta’s beercan, the 70-200mm f4. Times have changed, and with that, so has lens technology. The 70-200mm arrived in the same box as the Sony a77II, which has been a joy to use, and while this lens isn’t all that affordable, it’s a strong addition to anyone’s kit.

With a constant aperture starting at f2.8 and stopping down to f32, the lens also features a nine-blade aperture and some of the company’s other technologies.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon 7D MK II review product images (1 of 10)ISO 4001-30 sec at f - 4.0

We’ve been waiting many years for it, and this year the Canon 7D MK II has finally come. Canon in years past has been a very conservative company when it comes to new products. Not many changes have been made to many of their previous offerings with the Canon Rebel series being the most obvious amongst these. The 7D Mk II though is a camera surely designed for current Canon customers and users.

With a modest bump in the megapixel count from 18 to 20.9MP, the 7D Mk II also delivers better high ISO results than many of its immediate competitors. And while this can be a huge selling point, there is something holding that back.

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