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point and shoot

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon D810 review lead product image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

At least every other day, we receive an email or message of some sort asking about what camera someone should purchase. In fact, I’ve been dealing with emails like this for years via the Phoblographer and during my time at B&H Photo. Usually, it’s from someone who knows nothing about photography. A former colleague of mine recently messaged me and said something along the lines of “Hey, the wife and I are thinking about buying a DSLR. I heard the D800 is good. What should I get?”

Granted, he and his wife know nothing about photography and when I tried to tell him that they don’t need a DSLR or anything as high level as a D800, he thought that I was completely insane. Then I offered alternatives from Fujifilm and Sony in the high end point and shoot world. He retorted with “Okay, just tell me this then: Canon or Nikon?”

Again, I told him that a DSLR is over his head, unless he really wants to learn how to use one to its potential. In truth, it’s also serious overkill.

“Why do you want a DSLR?” I said.

“Better pictures.” He said.

“Yes, but you’ll only get better pictures if you really want to dedicate yourself to learning how to use one. And with a kid on the way you won’t have the time.” I returned.

The point though is that not everyone needs a DSLR or a mirrorless camera. To be incredibly honest, most of the work that I do for the site or the paid photography gigs that I do doesn’t require super high end cameras. But to be fair, I have great lighting knowledge.

Still though, I seriously think that everyone needs to stop just reaching for DSLRs and mirrorless cameras and instead take a strong look at what the high end point and shoot market is offering. There are loads and loads of great options.

And of course, no one is making a bad camera.

 

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon G1x product images (7 of 7)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 4.0

When walking around the streets of any big city, the best camera is always the one that you have on you. But lots of us here at the Phoblographer love point and shoots. These cameras are lightweight, better than a phone, small, and so low profile that no one will think that you look like a creep. But what we care about a whole lot more is the image quality–and many modern cameras perform more than well enough to please even the most snobbish of shooters.

Here are our picks for the best cameras for street photography.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon G1x product images (7 of 7)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 4.0

When we first had the chance to play with the Canon G1x Mk II back around CES 2014, we were quite impressed with the specs and the build quality. Its previous version, however, had both high ISO problems and autofocusing issues–which plagued the otherwise very good camera. Canon decided to give it another shot with very modest improvements where it counts. Their efforts created what we believe to be an almost perfect companion camera–almost a notebook for your life.

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Olympus XZ-2

Olympus XZ-2

In the world of enthusiast’s compacts, lenses with fast initial apertures have become somewhat a standard. The Panasonic LX-series first featured an f2.0 lens in the LX3, then came the f1.8 lenses in various models, and for a while now we’ve had f1.4 lenses in the Lumix LX7 and the Samsung EX2F. But in the next Olympus model, we might just see an über-fast 50mm-equivalent f1.0 lens.

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fishing

Just when we though the era of the point-and-shoot was over, new models come trickling in. And it seems that when Olympus introduced the Stylus 1 a while back, a new era of the point-and-shoot began. This is the era of the specialized point-and-shoot that comes with a clever twist, something that makes each model unique and stand out from the crowd. And above all, that makes it a camera you’d actually consider to buy for a change.

The latest point-and-shoot models from Olympus are the rugged TOUGH TG3 and the superzoom model SH-1, and both are trying to win your heart with unique features. Read on past the break to find out if one of them is for you.

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Review: Sony RX10

by Julius Motal on 03/25/2014

julius motal the phoblographer sony rx10-4

In the pantheon of cameras that were, are, and will be, it is rare that a point-and-shoot will turn heads. That’s not to say that there haven’t been any, but so many compromises are made with cheaper cameras that it’s easy to forget about them altogether. Enter the Sony RX10, a point-and-shoot camera with an impressive lens and a DSLR aesthetic in the Cyber-shot line. It’s a bridge camera, and in Sony’s case, the halfway-point between its Cyber-shot and Alpha lines. Consider it a Cyber-alpha, really. Throughout the monthlong review period, I often forgot that I was working with a point-and-shoot, but I never completely forgot.

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