Farrah Skeiky Photographs Big Differences in the Modern Punk Scene

“Listen, it’s not ‘thirty, flirty, and thriving,'” explains photographer Farrah Skeiky to us in an interview. “It’s ‘thirty, flirty, and if the shoe doesn’t have the word Air or Jordan in the name, I’ve put in gel insoles,’…I stretch, I drink at least a gallon of water every day, and I take my vitamins.” Farrah embodies lots of the ideals of the modern punk and hardcore scene in her photography. She’s done lots of diversity, LGBTQ+, and cause-centered work over her career. And like lots of other photographers, she couldn’t wait to get back to shooting when the pandemic died down a bit.

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“Flora” Is an Upcoming Zine for Double Exposure Fans

If you’re into double exposure snaps and want some creative inspiration, you might want to support this zine project on floral doubles.

Double exposures may not be a recent invention in the photography world, but the last decade saw more and more photographers experimenting with it. We’ve seen this creative technique become popular for portraits juxtaposed with buildings, seascapes, foliage, and flowers. If you’re particularly interested in floral double exposures, we found a zine project you might want to support on Kickstarter.

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‘Their Grind Not Mine’ Is a Zine That Explores the Human Form

All images of the zine by Lester Jones. Used with permission.

“I shot quick candid portraits and my obsession with documenting this further was born,” said Lester Jones. a photographer who connects to the daily life of the people he lives amongst. His project – and now zine – Their Grind Not Mine, takes a candid look at the mundane, difficult routines people endure. Shot in several major cities around the world, the work looks at the cultures and behaviors of the human form. In this collection of street portraits and street photography, Lester has turned every day, monotonous normalities into something interesting and compelling.

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This Photo Zine Showcases the Ubiquitous Vending Machines of Japan

This project could be a nice addition to photo zine collectors who are also fans of all things Japan.

Attention, photo zine collectors! If you’re fond of projects that are set in the eye-catching streets of Japan, here’s one you might want to support. Perth-based Natalie Blom is putting together a Vending Machines of Japan zine, which highlights the vending machines dotting virtually every corner in the country.

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What I Learned After One Year of Trying to Make My Own Zine

I spent a year rounding up the work of some of the best analog photographers for a zine, and I learned so much along the way.

It’s 2018; who the hell in their right mind would want to sit there and create a zine? Well for one, me. In fact, tons of photographers do it for their own marketing purposes. Emulsion, my latest zine and experiment with my company, was more or less a labor of love for a year. Editorially, I had no help. Business wise, I need to thank my good buddy Justin Kirck for helping to keep me sane throughout the process. Kickstarting this was difficult, going through all the submissions was daunting, laying out and coordinating all the assets was draining, and getting all of this printed was as smooth as it could have possibly been from Blurb with all the variables we had. But after a year, I did it. Though I’m very forward about typically saying “we” on this blog, this venture was something specifically spearheaded and done by me.

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Blurb Now Offers to Print Your Zines With Upgraded Economy Magazine Paper

Still haven’t ticked making your very first zine off your to-do list? Blurb has a new offering that will convince you to jump right in and do it.

Blurb has been one of the top self-publishing platforms for magazines and books, and with its new offering, it may become even more popular. If you make your own zines or plan to make one sometime in the future, you may want to check out the platform’s new Economy paper upgrade.

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On Making Your Own Photobook: What You Need to Know

Coffee table books, zines, photo books–whatever you want to call them, printing is obviously involved with the process of creating one. Photographers looking to have another way of showing off their portfolio rather than just showing off something on an iPad should truthfully consider the idea of looking at and presenting their projects in a photo book of some sort. This doesn’t mean that they need to be big, sprawling editions like the ones that you’re destined to see at a bookstore. Instead, they can be a bit more compact to fit onto a coffee table, in a messenger bag, or toted along for a trip to the beach. When you’re creating a photobook, you should really have these and a number of other things in mind.

When Should You Make a Photo Book?

Don’t get me wrong here, all photographers at one point in their career or not should make a photo book. But when? Well, here are some tips:

  • At the completion of a big photo project that you’ve been working on for a while
  • When you’ve got a very big portfolio of images. You can use them as mailers to send out to clients
  • When you’re looking to find a way to be more experimental with the images that you create
  • When you need money

To make them more valuable, you can also consider making them in only limited numbers.

Kickstarter? Or No?

If you’re considering a photo book and you’re of the more web savvy audience out there, then chances are that you’ve considered making a photo book by use of Kickstarter funds. Lots of photographers do it, we report on them often over at the Phoblographer. There are photographers who do Instant Film nudes and make a whole lot of money in the process of making the book. Then there are photographers who do things like documentary stories. Besides funding, Kickstarter has a few great tie-ins. For example, there’s the marketing involved. Companies often sit there scouring Kickstarter looking for ways to get money by building the marketing initiative of certain projects. Big blogs (my own included) also often look for these projects to report on. So if you’re looking to go big with your photo book, then try going for a Kickstarter. But in order to do that:

  • Consider the possibility of mass appeal
  • Get a gauge of the pricing you need
  • Consider setting the bar astronomically low. The reason why is because people are more likely to donate once they know that a project has been successfully funded.
  • Do a media outreach campaign
  • Post it to Reddit
  • Share it in Facebook groups
  • If you can find collaborators, ask them to help you promote it.

Choosing the Work to Be in Your Photo Book

Here’s where all of this starts to get pretty tricky. If you’re curating a project, it isn’t a good idea to put every single photo from the project in there. Why? Well, not every photo looks good in the space of a book. This is determined by a number of factors:

  • Colors: I’m going to get to this more later, but that is tied into the types of paper used
  • Vertical or Landscape: PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE do not be that photographer that puts a photo across the layout so that it gets broken in half by a page fold/crease

And then there is the obvious stuff of curating a project. What I tell a lot of photographers is that you should look at the project and find photos that reach out to people emotionally. If it can make them react then they’re bound to sit there looking at the image and every little part of the photo. If someone is just thumbing through your work, then consider that to be death.

Layout 101

So if you’re not going to make photos go across the fold of your zine or book, then what do you do? Essentially, you’ll need to find ways to make them work on a single page. There are tons of layout options. You can put photos all by themselves or you can stack them next to other other. What I tell a lot of photographers to do though is to try to keep them as far away from the crease as you can. If you’re using a service like Blurb or Adobe’s options then they’ll give you warnings about this. Ensure that your images are also at a high DPI designed for printing. If they’re not, then lay those photos out smaller. The bigger and thicker your book is, the more you’ll need to work to keep those images away from the crease.

Oh, also don’t forget about text. Lots of photographers tend to opt out when it comes to text but as a neutral viewer, I can’t tell you how important it can be. Additionally, the placement of the text shouldn’t make the eye strain. So go a bit bigger with the font.

The Types of Paper

If you’re creating a photo book for the first time, consider the types of paper that you may want to work with. Some folks go for a luster type of paper with a bit of gloss, but consider the fact that if someone is viewing your book under a light source that the light is going to reflect off of the paper. That sometimes doesn’t do justice to the images. In my living room, I’ve got a number of zines and some of my favorites have matte pages or something with just a bit of gloss to them. Gloss can make colors look better, but it isn’t always the best viewing experience. So you’ll need to balance your needs here.

While this may seem like a null issue to some photographers, it’s a big one to others.

On Making Your Own Photobook: What You Need to Know

Coffee table books, zines, photo books–whatever you want to call them, printing is obviously involved with the process of creating one. Photographers looking to have another way of showing off their portfolio rather than just showing off something on an iPad should truthfully consider the idea of looking at and presenting their projects in a photo book of some sort. This doesn’t mean that they need to be big, sprawling editions like the ones that you’re destined to see at a bookstore. Instead, they can be a bit more compact to fit onto a coffee table, in a messenger bag, or toted along for a trip to the beach. When you’re creating a photobook, you should really have these and a number of other things in mind.

When Should You Make a Photo Book?

Don’t get me wrong here, all photographers at one point in their career or not should make a photo book. But when? Well, here are some tips:

  • At the completion of a big photo project that you’ve been working on for a while
  • When you’ve got a very big portfolio of images. You can use them as mailers to send out to clients
  • When you’re looking to find a way to be more experimental with the images that you create
  • When you need money

To make them more valuable, you can also consider making them in only limited numbers.

Kickstarter? Or No?

If you’re considering a photo book and you’re of the more web savvy audience out there, then chances are that you’ve considered making a photo book by use of Kickstarter funds. Lots of photographers do it, we report on them often over at the Phoblographer. There are photographers who do Instant Film nudes and make a whole lot of money in the process of making the book. Then there are photographers who do things like documentary stories. Besides funding, Kickstarter has a few great tie-ins. For example, there’s the marketing involved. Companies often sit there scouring Kickstarter looking for ways to get money by building the marketing initiative of certain projects. Big blogs (my own included) also often look for these projects to report on. So if you’re looking to go big with your photo book, then try going for a Kickstarter. But in order to do that:

  • Consider the possibility of mass appeal
  • Get a gauge of the pricing you need
  • Consider setting the bar astronomically low. The reason why is because people are more likely to donate once they know that a project has been successfully funded.
  • Do a media outreach campaign
  • Post it to Reddit
  • Share it in Facebook groups
  • If you can find collaborators, ask them to help you promote it.

Choosing the Work to Be in Your Photo Book

Here’s where all of this starts to get pretty tricky. If you’re curating a project, it isn’t a good idea to put every single photo from the project in there. Why? Well, not every photo looks good in the space of a book. This is determined by a number of factors:

  • Colors: I’m going to get to this more later, but that is tied into the types of paper used
  • Vertical or Landscape: PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE do not be that photographer that puts a photo across the layout so that it gets broken in half by a page fold/crease

And then there is the obvious stuff of curating a project. What I tell a lot of photographers is that you should look at the project and find photos that reach out to people emotionally. If it can make them react then they’re bound to sit there looking at the image and every little part of the photo. If someone is just thumbing through your work, then consider that to be death.

Layout 101

So if you’re not going to make photos go across the fold of your zine or book, then what do you do? Essentially, you’ll need to find ways to make them work on a single page. There are tons of layout options. You can put photos all by themselves or you can stack them next to other other. What I tell a lot of photographers to do though is to try to keep them as far away from the crease as you can. If you’re using a service like Blurb or Adobe’s options then they’ll give you warnings about this. Ensure that your images are also at a high DPI designed for printing. If they’re not, then lay those photos out smaller. The bigger and thicker your book is, the more you’ll need to work to keep those images away from the crease.

Oh, also don’t forget about text. Lots of photographers tend to opt out when it comes to text but as a neutral viewer, I can’t tell you how important it can be. Additionally, the placement of the text shouldn’t make the eye strain. So go a bit bigger with the font.

The Types of Paper

If you’re creating a photo book for the first time, consider the types of paper that you may want to work with. Some folks go for a luster type of paper with a bit of gloss, but consider the fact that if someone is viewing your book under a light source that the light is going to reflect off of the paper. That sometimes doesn’t do justice to the images. In my living room, I’ve got a number of zines and some of my favorites have matte pages or something with just a bit of gloss to them. Gloss can make colors look better, but it isn’t always the best viewing experience. So you’ll need to balance your needs here.

While this may seem like a null issue to some photographers, it’s a big one to others.

Instants: An 80-page Nude Photo Book Made of Impossible Film (NSFW)

Instant Film, and film in general really, is enjoying a burst of popularity recently and it is bleeding over into all genres of photography. Many photographers are using instant prints, be it [amazon_textlink asin=’B00G6C7XUG’ text=’Instax’ template=’ProductLink’ store=’thephobl-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’6a75d295-658d-11e7-a5c1-6390a05ab344′], [amazon_textlink asin=’B01LX5RTQX’ text=’Impossible’ template=’ProductLink’ store=’thephobl-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’770b423f-658d-11e7-95bd-c577930df58e’] or one of the many other options on the market for whole projects with really interesting and wide-ranging results. One such project that may be of interest to some of you is a new nude photo book over on Kickstarter called Instants. Continue reading…

Zine Review: She Shoots Film No. 1

A while back we wrote about She Shoots Film: a special analog photography zine put together by a number of designers and photographers using money from an IndieGoGo campaign. The magazine, which has won quite a bit of acclaim thus far, is a continuation of the underground photography culture’s progression into moving off of the social web and back into a distraction free environment. Spearheaded by four women, She Shoots Film may excite some photographers and turn others off simply because, well, we live in a marginalized world. Though if you remove the fact that the magazine is put together by women and features exclusively women, then you’re bound to be amazed by not only the quality of work presented in the first edition, but the very subtle details put into the actual production of the zine itself.

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Magnum Photographer Susan Meiselas Talks About the Importance of Photo Books

All images by Susan Meiselas and Magnum Photos. All images are used with permission.

The Photobook–it’s at a place within the digital world where sometimes it can be tough to wrap your head around it depending on what generation you’re in. But like zines, they’re a great way to market yourself and get the story out about the work you’re doing. Just ask Susan Meiselas of Magnum Photos. A decorated and veteran photographer, Susan has been photographing social conflicts for years now, and in a few days from the publication of this piece, she’ll be on a panel hosted by Magnum. Specifically, her panel in the one day symposium will cover Photobooks on Social and Political Conflict.

Before the event starts, I had the opportunity to ask Susan a few questions about her thoughts on the role of the photobook today.

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Babette de Jong: A Talent for Fantastic Analog Film Landscape Photography

All images by Babette de Jong. Used with permission.

When Babette de Jong sent us an email to submit to the analog zine, I carefully went through her submission as I have with everyone who entered to be featured. Babette’s strength is in landscape photography. She loves film photography and strives to get it all as perfectly right in camera as she possibly can.

But more importantly, she’s just a good photographer. And her submission is after the jump.

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Less Than 48 Hours are Left in Our Analog Zine Kickstarter! Go Donate!

Hi everyone,

As you most likely know, our Analog Zine Kickstarter was fully funded. Again, a genuine thank you to everyone who donated. But I’d like to summon everyone’s attention who was interested in donating to the project but didn’t because it was too early on. With less than 48 hours left in the campaign, at this point you’re basically just buying a zine with the option of a year long basic subscription to La Noir Image; our premium black and white photography website.

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Our Analog Zine Kickstarter Ends in a Few Days. You Can Still Donate!

Hi everyone,

This is one of our last reminders: our Analog photography zine Kickstarter is now fully funded. Again, a big thank you to everyone who made this possible. It means a whole lot to us. However, if you still want one and were afraid to donate before, you’ve got no worries now. At this point, you’re essentially just buying a zine with the option of also getting a subscription to La Noir Image.

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10 Days to Go on Our Kickstarter: Help Us Make a Beautiful Zine about Analog Photography

Hey everyone,

We’ve got 10 days left to get our Kickstarter fully funded and we’re almost there! But we can use more support. Just a reminder: our zine is going to be all about analog photography. It’s going to feature 100 pages of photos and short interviews profiling a number of photographers on why they create photos. In this way, we’re looking to inspire photographers and their creativity and not just base it around the gear–although there will be short tidbits on what the photographers use.

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Be Inspired By Some of the World’s Best Modern Analog Photographers

Hey folks,

We’re still raising funding for our Analog Photography zine which we’re going to deliver later on this year. We’re profiling some of the world’s best analog photographers in this by pledging 100 pages of beautifully printed photos and stories from these photographers.

You can head on over to our Kickstarter or check out some more information about it after the jump.

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The Creation of a Street Photography Zine with WhiteWall

One of the myths around Street Photography is that it is an art-form you get into with no expectation of earning money or getting recognition. Though it may be easy to write it off as gospel, the truth is that recognition/generating sales in Street Photography is all about how you market yourself. In today’s uber-connected world there’s no shortage of places you can post your work – Instagram, Behance, or a personal website are all great places to start but if you want to get your work noticed by galleries then you’re going to need a printed portfolio of your work to really stand out.

And that’s where WhiteWall seems to truly excel!

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Why the Zine Can Be the Most Effective Way to Market Yourself

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Samsung 50-150mm f2.8 OIS review product images (10 of 10)ISO 4001-40 sec at f - 4.0

Instagram, VSCO, a website, Twitter, Facebook–they’re all great ways of marketing yourself and your photography. But they all have something very much in common: they’re all online. Online, there is no transparency, you can’t fully experience something and everything you see is behind a screen. Your monitor may be adjusted differently from the way someone else’s is and they’ll get a different viewing experience than others.

Everyone (every big wig in photography marketing that is) says that you should be on these platforms. We don’t disagree with them at all. In fact, we completely agree. But we also think that you should try something different: a zine.

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