The Fujifilm X Pro 3 Has Something Uniquely Special About It

The Fujifilm X Pro 3 is the best camera on the market for anyone who doesn’t want to stare at a screen all day.

“Aren’t you just sick of all these zoom meetings,” is what a rep called and told me on the phone earlier in the pandemic. She called me out of the blue, and I completely agreed with her. But I didn’t realize how deep her words hit me. The entire staff has discussed how we’re all sick of staring at screens. And the Fujifilm X Pro 3 is the perfect answer to that. Yes, there are options like the Leica M10-D. But you’ll probably complain about its price more than you will the X Pro 3’s screen. 

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5 Ways the Fujifilm X Pro 3 Hints at What the Next X100 Camera Is Like

The Fujifilm X Pro 3’s development was announced at the Fujifilm X Summit, and it’s quite innovative.

The X Pro 3 is a camera we have been eagerly anticipating as the rest of the industry has kept putting out cameras, lenses, etc. It honestly felt a bit like Fujifilm was quiet on the higher end of the X series in 2019. Understandably, this caused some anxiety among some Fujifilm users. I have a specific camera bag packed fill with Fujifilm gear that I use and was becoming antsy wondering how Fujifilm was going to innovate. What they announced came entirely out of the left field for me. But it also opened up even more questions, such as what the next X100 camera may be like.

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What the Canon EOS R Needs Via Firmware Updates

The Canon EOS R isn’t all that bad of a camera; but like the iconic Canon 5D Mk II before it, I hope that Canon gives it a lot of firmware updates.

Let’s be frank here, one of the only ways that the Canon EOS R will really truly survive beyond the glorious lens selection with this much competition is through constant support of the camera. Look at Fujifilm–you can purchase a Fujifilm X-T2 and at the end of the camera’s life cycle you can feel like you’ve got a brand new camera due to how Fujifilm treats their customers. Canon hasn’t always had this same mentality and so it’s time to embrace it even more. After using the Canon EOS R for an extended amount of time, I really think that it’s going to need a few updates via firmware to get folks moved away from other systems.

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This New Tech Could Bring Hybrid Viewfinders To Canon DSLRs

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Canon is cooking up some sweet viewfinder tech in their R&D labs!

One of the biggest benefits of a mirrorless system, in my opinion, is the EVF, especially these days with as good as they have gotten. However, there are still just times and situations where an OVF is an ideal shooting scenario. Unfortunately, there aren’t any cameras out there right now that offer this functionality with TTL viewing. Fujifilm’s X-Pro and X100 series camera have hybrid EVFs but the OVF is not TTL.

That may soon change for Canon DSLR cameras in the next generation, or at least Canon is playing with the idea, as a recently filed patent shows. Continue reading…

Useful Photography Tip #112: Prevent Eye Strain by Adjusting Your Camera Diopter For Your Vision

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon D810 first impressions product images (5 of 8)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 3.2

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When it comes to seeing through a viewfinder, many folks don’t ever bother to adjust the diopter of their camera. But the truth is that you really should adjust it lest your eyes strain when looking through this very small hole. The problem though is with people not knowing how to properly adjust it for themselves.

For starters, consider your eyesight. If you wear glasses you’ll know whether you’re near sighted or far sighted. Depending on your prescription, you’ll want to adjust the diopter accordingly. Diopters often have a +2 or =3 setting to enable photographers to adjust what they see through the viewfinder for their vision.

Both EVF and OVF work differently though. With an EVF, it’s mostly a matter of looking through the viewfinder, turning on text displays and adjusting the diopter until you can see the text correctly. But when working with an OVF, it can become much trickier as what you’re seeing is optical and not electronic. For optical viewfinders, we recommend taking the lens off, pointing the camera at a light source and looking at the focusing points through the viewfinder. Then adjust the setting accordingly until you see them the clearest. When this is done, you’ll have set the diopter for your eye.