Fernando Sciotto Captures the Cycle of Life in Infrared (NSFW)

“The day I found out about Kodak Aerochrome, I knew I must have it,” the photographer Fernando Sciotto tells me. “The film is expired, discontinued many years ago. The colors are unreal. All the mystique around that film seemed poetic to me, so I bought it knowing that one day I was going to need it to do something special. I got it from eBay for about €120 a roll (35mm), and I had it in my fridge for several months.”

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Rob Walwyn Captures the Bushfires’ Aftermath on Rare Aerochrome Film

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“On the 1st of March, 2020, I went for a drive and bushwalk in the Blue Mountains with some friends,” the photographer Rob Walwyn remembers. Two days later, on March 3rd, New South Wales would officially announce that all fires had been contained for the first time in 240 days. When all was said and done, 80% of the Blue Mountains World Heritage Area would burn during the bushfire crisis of 2019-20. 

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Jason De Freitas Transforms New Zealand Into An Infrared Wonderland

“I wanted to have the experience of shooting Aerochrome at least once while I still had the chance,” the photographer Jason De Freitas tells me. He bought his first rolls in 2018, saving them until he found a landscape worthy of the now-famous discontinued infrared-sensitive film and its signature magentas and hot pinks. In the end, he packed his bags and traveled to New Zealand’s South Island, known for its towering peaks, lush rainforests, and secret waterfalls. 

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Doug Golupski: Shoot Kodak Aerochrome Like Slide Film

With Kodak Aerochrome still one of the most enigmatic yet sought after emulsions today, we couldn’t help but ask Doug Golupski to tell us how he works with this film to create stunning landscape snaps.

“If you understand how to shoot slide film, Aerochrome is no different,” Doug Golupski said on the common misconception that Aerochrome is a fragile film that requires special treatment. It is indeed a special infrared film, as his stunning results, and many before him, show us. His Kodak Aerochrome snaps are among the best we’ve seen, so we thought it was only proper to put them on spotlight — and ask him more about his tips and tricks for making the most out of this film. If you’ve ever wanted to grab some rolls but also felt afraid of wasting them, this interview feature should be an insightful resource for you.

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John Berner Talks About How Kodak Aerochrome Inspired His Art

Kodak Aerochrome, the legendary infrared film that has mesmerized photographers with its surreal false colors, has also become instrumental in artist John Berner’s installations.

When Richard Mosse completed Infra in 2011, he probably didn’t expect that it would become one of the most celebrated works of photography, and inspire creatives to seek to paint their own works with its surreal color palette. It was all made possible by Kodak Aerochrome, the famous false color infrared film that needs no introduction. Mosse eventually became the photographer who catapulted the film to cult status, with many citing his work as the stimulus behind their own forays into the legendary emulsion.

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Ryan Struck Photographs Adventure with Kodak Aerochrome Film

All images by Ryan Struck. Used with permission.

One of the things I really enjoy doing is follow up interviews with photographers to share how they’ve grown and made themselves into success stories. In the case of photographer Ryan Struck you’re going to have a giant smile on your face. We interviewed Ryan years ago about the lifestyle surfing work he does on the East Coast. The last time I saw him, he packed up and left New York and moved about. He’s back now, and Ryan is showcasing a special project that he did called World & Color. This project showcases his travels to various places and is shot with the elusive Kodak Aerochrome film.

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Snag Some Kodak Aerochrome Color Infrared 120 Film on eBay!

There are some Kodak Aerochrome Color Infrared films up for grabs on ebay, but you have to be quick!

Aside from vintage cameras, we also keep an eye out on ebay for some cool films to try. Among the most coveted of these is Kodak Aerochrome, the legendary infrared false color film that produces stunning purple, crimson, and magenta hues. We spotted some listed on ebay, but you have to be fast, as the rolls are selling like pancakes (not surprising).

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Lomography Announces a Brand New Formula for LomoChrome Purple 400

It’s been a few years since Lomography announced LomoChrome Purple, and just today they’ve announced a new update to the film. The new Lomochrome Purple 400 film is designed to be a whole lot more stable. With that said, we start out with a recommended and set exposure at ISO 400 vs the previous version of the film which was said to need a lot of light. To that end, it wasn’t uncommon that photographers shot it at ISO 200 or even 100. The new Lomochrome Purple will continue to shift blues to greens, greens to purples and yellows to pinks. The new emulsion increases the film’s sensitivity to red hues.

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Jack Seikaly: Digital Infrared Photography Influenced by Kodak Aerochrome

All images by Jack Seikaly. Used with permission.

“I’m a confused pessimist at heart. I view a world that is in a constant state of chaos and anarchy, generally getting worse over time,” says Jack Seikaly about his infrared photography. “The message I try to portray in my infrared shots is this: ‘the world may be terrible, but look at all the beauty it also has to offer.'”

Born in London, raised in Beirut, and living in Montreal, Jack has been given the privilege to view the world from multiple perspectives and understand different cultures. Along the way, he’s been taking photos. Like many others out there, he was infatuated with the HDR photography process until he started to go towards the world of Infrared. “I’ve now opened my eyes to the wonders of infrared, continuously evolving my technique and style,” he tell us.

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New Petition Asks Kodak to Revive Kodak Infrared Ektachrome Film

Lead Photo by Steve Harwood. Used with Creative Commons Permission

A new online petition on Change.org is appealing to Kodak to bring back yet another film emulsion: Kodak Infrared Ektachrome. This film is not to be confused with Kodak Aerochrome–which we’ve featured very prominently on this website. Kodak discontinued the film along with a lot of their infrared films due to people just not buying it–as is the case with lots of films being discontinued. However, with a new generation of photographers starting out in digital and then picking up film afterwards coming to the fore, Infrared film may have a new home soon.

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Kodak Aerochrome: Standard Use and Cross Processing

All images by Nick Seaney. Used with permission. Lead photo done in E-6.

Photography Nick Seaney has been shooting film for a very long time, and like many photographers he returned to film again because he hated sitting in front of a computer afterwards to edit. When he finally had a chance to play with the amazing Kodak Aerochrome infrared film, he was ecstatic to experiment with it and figure out all the cool possibilities is has.

For those not in the know, Aerochrome is an infrared film developed for use by the US Military to find guerrilla forces in places like the Congo. However, it’s been used by other photographers for more creative and interesting uses.

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Kodak Aerocolor IV Film is a Great Way to Burn Over $1,500

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No, the film above isn’t Kodak Aerochrome or Lomochrome Purple–instead, it’s something much different though we’ve understand why experienced shooters might believe it to be otherwise.. The image above is from Kodak Aerocolor IV negative film 2460 and it costs you quite a pretty penny depending on the configuration you get of it: we’re talking well over $1,500.

Aerocolor IV is an ISO 125 color aerial film that is designed for aerial photography; and that’s just what the Canadian government has used it for. For years though, Aerochrome III infrared (not Aerochrome III color) was designed to deliver similar looking results with turning greens into pinks/purples as you see above. However, Aerocolor IV is a color aerial film, not an infrared.

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New Petition is Trying to Revive Kodak Aerochrome

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Image by Dan Zvereff. Used in our previous interview with him.

For all the lovers of the analog world out there, you should know that a recent Change.org petition to revive one of the greatest films that the world has seen: Kodak Aerochrome. Shooting Film first caught wind of the story and states that UK based Jasmin G is calling on Kodak Alaris and the Lomography company to revive the film. Lomography tried to do a variant called Lomochrome Purple, but it totally isn’t the same thing. While Lomochrome puts an emphasis on purple colors, Aerochrome put it on a pinkish purplish red.

How do they do this? For starters, Aerochrome was an infrared film originally developed for surveillance reasons. Years ago, the US would fly planes over the Congo and other regions with dense vegetation to find guerilla troops. When developed, the film would render the greens into a color like what you see in the image above that leads this story. However, later on the commercial world started to use it for art projects. Dan Zvereff and Richard Mosse are two famous photographers that come to mind at first. We have a full introduction to the film at this link–which also explains how it works.

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