Review: Lomography XPro Slide 200 Film (35mm Format)

To begin this review, I’m going to say flat out that Lomography XPro Slide 200 film has to, hands down, be the weirdest film I’ve ever worked with. But it’s also been a pleasure and a very fulfilling learning experience in my own pursuits of bettering my photography knowledge. To say this wasn’t a challenge is an extreme understatement. Within three rolls, I tried to “get it right”. Pretty simple you’d think, right? Well, yeah–even I’d sit there and call me a dumbass. Except that Lomography XPro Slide 200 film isn’t a conventional film at all.

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Developing Film with the Wrong Chemicals Kills Instagram Any Day

CHAMPAGNE

CHAMPAGNE

All images shot and developed by Matthew Cetta. Used with permission

Developing your film with the wrong chemicals has been long known to many photographers–and the more savvy of us call it cross processing. But NYC based photographer and owner of Synapse Shots Matthew Cetta has been experimenting with what he calls Photogenic Alchemy. Basically, what he’s doing is developing film with loads of other weird chemicals: like absinthe. The project involves using a Holga that he converted to shoot 35mm film and he started the project to help him get out of a deep depression.

Matt states that the results made him feel like a kid again, and that everything once again became experimental and new. The project has been going on for a while now, and some of his other examples are after the jump.

If anything, it should teach us to never pigeon hole ourselves, and instead to embrace our creative freedom.

Be sure to also follow Matt on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

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Cross Processing an Image in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 3

Cross Processing—it’s been all the rave for quite some time now and you’ve probably seen it all over the interwebs. Back in the film days, cross processing meant developing your film with the wrong chemicals in order to get some weird and kooky effects. In the digital age, it can be done with manipulation and understanding of color theory. Though I’m often one to go against trends myself, I’ve done this for wedding clients and they loved it. Since many readers of this site use Adobe Lightroom 3, I’m going to show you step by step and screenshot by screenshot just how to do this and without dropping hundreds of dollars on a Lomography camera and film. However, I’ll also tell you that if you haven’t tried the plastic cameras, you should do so at least once.

If you want to read more, you can read about processing the image in Photoshop Elements as well.

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