Review: Alien Skin Exposure X2 (Slightly NSFW)

In this world that we are in now with Adobe virtually refusing to fix the simplest of performance concerns with Lightroom after what has been years of complaints now, more and more third-party processing packages and software is getting looked at by photographers.

One such program is Alien Skin Exposure X2, which as long been a favorite plugin for many photographers looking to add some spice to their images that Lightroom couldn’t. We have had a chance to play with Exposure X2 adding it into our workflow and even giving it a shot as our primary image processor for the last month or so. Today we wanted to share our thoughts on it. Continue reading…

Alien Skin Unveils New Exposure X2 Processing Software

In the same conversation as On1 and Macphun, Alien Skin has been known for a while now thanks to their popular suite of standalone/LR & PS Plugin Compatible photo processing tools. Today the company unveiled their new Exposure X2 release, which allows photographers to do more than ever before in their Exposure software – limiting the back and forth between PS/LR that is needed.  Continue reading…

Review: Alien Skin Exposure 7

Agfa APX 25

Agfa APX 25. Perhaps one of my favorite black and white films.

Film emulsion rendering software is not a new concept, but each offering has their own strengths and weaknesses. Alien Skin has been in this industry for years, and recently updated their flagship software, Exposure, to the 7th edition. Exposure 7 can be used as a standalone software or in conjunction with Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop. Alien Skin, like VSCO, focuses more on an artistic way of doing things and also focuses on just delivering the best images that it can in a simplified way–which is on the other side of the spectrum of DxO. DxO uses loads and loads of science and lab tests.

For the enthusiast, Exposure 7 may be a great option to get the best from your images quickly.

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Alien Skin Software’s Exposure 5 Is All About That Film-Like Look

Kendall-copy

Image by Peter Nyugen

See that girl up above? She doesn’t look very alien does she? Maybe her homeworld is a bit alien, but Alien Skin’s new Exposure 5 is being touted as able to render all your images to look like film–something that is probably alien to lots of digital photographers. It is a plug-in for Lightroom or Photoshop but can also be used as a standalone program. Even further, the company is promising to have accurate looks for Kodachrome, Polaroid film, and more. Plus you’ll be able to add other effects like scratches.

Think of Instagram but a heck of a lot more versatile for users of real software.

Exposure 5 will be available in June 2013 through the company’s website for $199 USD. Owners of any version of Exposure may upgrade for $99 USD. Free upgrades will be automatically sent to everyone who purchased Exposure 4 directly from Alien Skin Software in March 2013 or later.

Review: Alien Skin Exposure 4

Before this year, the last frame of film I shot was probably 20 years ago, using my blue Mickey Mouse camera. Although as this year began, I found myself being drawn to old school, analog, film photography. I ended up challenging myself to shoot one roll of film, each week, for one year. I called this Project OneRollFifty2.

The more I shot film, the more I loved the look of it. Up until this point, I didn’t really know of any way to replicate these looks in digital photography. You could always take a shot into Photoshop, tweak a bunch of things, add textures, add noise, etc. and attempt to replicate film, but if would definitely be difficult to nail a certain film.

Then I heard about Alien Skin’s Exposure 4 software that mimics hundreds of different films and I had to give it a try. Alienskin says, “The result is a photo that looks like it was made by a human, not a computer”. Read on to see if they’re right.

Editor’s Note: This is a guest blog posting by Travis Lawton. You can find more of his work on his website at Travis Lawton Photography as well as his blog at The Lawtographer.

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