Review: Metz 64 AF-1 Flash (Sony Alpha E)

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Metz flash product photos (1 of 10)ISO 6401-50 sec at f - 4.0

Editor’s Correction: In an earlier version of this article, we called the flash the 54 AF-1. It is indeed the 64 AF-1. We apologize for this mistake.

Metz believes that the future of the flash is very…touchy. To be specific, we’re talking about a touch screen. So when the 64 AF-1 was shown to us around Photokina 2014, we were quite intrigued. The flashes are available for Canon, Nikon, Fujifilm, Sony and the Micro Four Thirds world. It tries to be futuristic with its massive touch LCD screen. Metz has been long known in the industry for having a more affordable alternative to the camera manufacturers, but in recent years they’ve stepped back to Phottix, Lumopro and Yongnuo.

The Metz 64 AF-1 otherwise is like many flashes on the market: it can rotate around and tilt its head. Unlike Sony’s flashes, the 64 AF-1 isn’t a cobra head design. But like many of Sony’s flashes, some of the settings can be controlled via the camera thanks to its interactions from the multi-interface shoe. This means that it will work with the NEX 6, A7, A7s, A7r, A7 Mk II, A99, A77, A77 Mk II and a couple of others.

The flash is also one of the first designed for the new Sony shoe since the company introduced it a couple of years ago. While it’s a good first attempt, it fails in certain aspects.

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A Comparison of How Olympus and Sony’s 5 Axis Stabilization Work

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Olympus OMD EM10 product photos (3 of 7)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.5

Sony and Olympus entered a gentleman’s agreement years ago to start collaborating in closer ways. With the latest announcement of the Sony A7 Mk II, it’s easy to believe that they have the same stabilization process. For many years now, Olympus has held the honor of having the best in-body image stabilization that we’ve seen. Indeed, whenever I need to shoot in impossibly low light, the camera that I reach for is my OMD EM5 paired with a Voigtlander 17.5mm f0.95 lens to shoot at very slow shutter speeds and with the lens wide open. Due to the depth of field and size of the sensor, shooting at f0.95 gives me the full frame equivalent of f2 in focus.

In a situation like that, technology like this could be very advantageous. But that isn’t a reason to discount what Sony is doing with its new 5 Axis Stabilization.

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DxOMark’s Sensor Scores State Canon 7D Mk II Looks Antiquated

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon 7D Mk II first impressions images (1 of 7)ISO 2001-160 sec at f - 3.2

Today is a sad, sad day for many Canon users. Photo Rumors is reporting that the 7D Mk II’s sensor seems very subpar in comparison to many of the latest DSLRs and APS-C sensors. According to DxOMark the 7D Mk II, which received a modest megapixel bump from the earlier version should have performed amazingly given Canon’s history of innovation. Unfortunately, the sensor here is on par with that of much older cameras. In fact, the sensor from the Nikon D300s outperforms it in some ways.

To put this in perspective, the D300s was one of the first cameras that we reviewed on the site. That was almost five years ago.

More after the jump.

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First Impressions: Sony A77 Mk II

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony A77 Mk II first impressions images (1 of 9)ISO 2001-60 sec at f - 3.2

There were rumors flying about of the new Sony A77 Mk II. And we’re happy to say that they indeed were true. A couple of days ago, Sony showed it off to us at their NYC headquarters. Complete with a new 24.3MP APS-C sized sensor, 12 fps shooting capabilities, over 70 AF points, and loads more, we can see it aimed squarely at the offerings of the big two: Canon and Nikon.

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