3 Affordable M-Mount Lenses to Adapt to Your Camera

The cool thing about Leica M-mount is how versatile the lens lineup is. It’s easy to get many of them used at great prices. But it’s also very possible to score M-mount lenses from other manufacturers for extremely affordable prices. Lucky for you, we’ve reviewed tons of M-mount lenses by Leica and lots of other manufacturers too. So we’re rounding up a bunch that are affordable and we think you’ll really like.

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The Phoblographer’s various product round-up features are done in-house. Our philosophy is simple: you wouldn’t get a Wagyu beef steak review from a lifelong vegetarian. And you wouldn’t get photography advice from someone who doesn’t touch the product. We only recommend gear that we’ve fully reviewed. If you’re wondering why your favorite product didn’t make the cut, there’s a chance it’s on another list. If we haven’t reviewed it, we won’t recommend it. This method keeps our lists packed with industry-leading knowledge. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Pro Tips on Using M-Mount Lenses

If you’re interested in using M-Mount lenses, here are some things everyone should know:

  • The Leica M-Mount was created originally by Leica. It was made during a time when manual focus was the way to do things.
  • All M-Mount lenses aren’t made by Leica. A lot are more affordable. The ones we’re recommending in this list are from Chinese manufacturers that we’ve reviewed and liked. These lenses were tested and adapted onto either Sony E-mount cameras or Leica L-mount cameras.
  • Leica branded lenses will always have a far superior build quality to anything else out there. There are zero exceptions to this rule.
  • All of these lenses can be used while zone focusing. This method can let you get a scene or subject in focus faster than some autofocus cameras.
  • All of these lenses have gorgeous bokeh, which is probably why you’re reaching for them.

7Artisans 28mm f1.4

In our review, we state:

“The 7Artisans 28mm f1.4 has a very unique image quality to it. But admittedly, it isn’t unique enough for me to be able to pick it out from the rest of the crowd. I’d liken it to some cheap glass. And essentially that’s what it is. These flaws it exhibits aren’t even necessarily picturesque. I’d expect problems like this from Lomography and for that to then be called a feature of some sort. But that’s not the case here. Overall, the lens’ image quality is just okay. It isn’t spectacular. If anything, I’d say the image quality is less than rudimentary in comparison to many other lenses on the market. To that end, every variant of a 28mm lens is pretty much better than this one. But it isn’t terrible. The workaround here is to shoot in black and white–sort of.”

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Mitakon 50mm f0.95 III

In our review, we state:

“The Mitakon 50mm f0.95 III doesn’t start to get really sharp until f4. That’s totally understandable if you’re going for a more classic look. It was only 13 years ago that lenses weren’t that sharp until you stopped them down that much. It’s totally a wonderful look. This also makes you shoot with more intent.”

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7Artisans 50mm f1.1

In our review, we state:

“Oh man, am I in love with this lens. Want that soft look? You can get it. Want that super sharp look? It’s got that. Want lens flare? Oh man, does this lens control it just right! The 7Artisans 50mm f1.1 surely has character to it. In the same way that I’ve always felt Leica, Zeiss, and Voigtlander lenses have a specific character to them, so too does this one. I don’t think it’s meant to be 100% perfect but it’s surely gorgeous in every single way.”

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Chris Gampat

Chris Gampat is the Editor in Chief, Founder, and Publisher of the Phoblographer. He also likes pizza.