These High-Resolution Cameras Capture Immense Details with Ease

Nikon cameras - Z7

If you need a high-resolution camera to capture intimate details in landscapes, fashion, or product shots, check out these cameras.

It wasn’t long ago when we were dreaming of mainstream cameras having sensors that packed over 30 megapixels. Today, we have an abundance of high-resolution cameras that can capture an immense amount of details, and are quite affordable when you consider the amount of tech and power these cameras pack. If you’re a landscape photographer, high-fashion photographer, product photographers, or if you get a high from pixel-peeping images, the high-resolution cameras we list in this roundup are the ones you should take a closer look at.

The high-resolution cameras here have at least a 30-megapixel sensor. Anything over 24 megapixels can be considered high-resolution simply because, for most people, 24 megapixels is more than enough: especially seeing as most people post online these days and don’t bother to print. The cameras listed below are for those who need to be able to capture fine details in whatever it is they are shooting. Pick up any one of these and you’ll be able to pixel peep for days. Check out some of our favorite high-resolution cameras below.

Sony A7R IV – 61 Megapixels

The next Canon EOS R needs to crush the Sony A7R IV

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Improved ergonomics
  • Blazing fast autofocus
  • Excellent weather sealing
  • Anti-flicker shooting
  • Dual UHS-II SD card slots
  • More resolution than most photographers will need

Cons

  • Limited touchscreen functionality: You still can’t navigate the menus or interact with the display
  • Large file sizes (to be expected)

Buy now: $3,497.98

Nikon D850 – 46.8 Megapixels

Innovative cameras - Nikon D850

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Fantastic image quality
  • Built like a tank
  • Buttons that light up
  • The touch screen makes the menu navigation so much better
  • Great color depth and versatility
  • Wifi and Bluetooth
  • Putting the ISO button on the right side of the camera by the grip is the better long term strategy
  • Weather sealing
  • Lots of video options
  • Dual card slots
  • The best viewfinder of any DSLR we’ve used

Cons

  • Slower autofocus than the Nikon D810 in some situations
  • We wish the white balance levels were a bit more adjustable
  • Sort of shocked the dual card slots aren’t both SD

Buy now: $2,996.95

Fujifilm GFX 100 – 102 Megapixels

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • 102 amazing Megapixels
  • Under $10,000 for one of the most powerful Medium Format cameras on the market
  • It uses the same autofocus system as the X-T3
  • A gorgeous electronic viewfinder
  • The menu system is perhaps only second to Canon’s in terms of design
  • The image quality is simply jaw-dropping
  • Fantastic high ISO capabilities
  • Very good battery life
  • The top and rear LCD and OLED panels are easy to see and read in bright conditions

Cons

  • Quite possibly the worst ergonomics of any camera we’ve used
  • The thumb rest on the back is poorly designed
  • The body of the Fujifilm GFX 100 feels incredibly cheap
  • The buttons are mushy and have hardly any tactile feel
  • AF tracking was hit or miss, as was the eye AF
  • The touchscreen cannot be used to navigate the menu system
  • The grip is too shallow and does not provide a comfortable way to hold this 3lb camera
  • The vertical grip is untextured and incredibly slippery

Buy now: $9,999

Canon 5Ds – 50.6 Megapixels

canon cameras

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Solid build quality, though heavy
  • Lots of resolution for those who need it
  • Beautiful viewfinder
  • Very deep color versatility
  • Weather resistance
  • Some of the best autofocusing capabilities we’ve seen with a Canon DSLR

Cons

  • Odd menu changes if you’re a veteran Canon user. Micro adjustment isn’t in the same spot anymore
  • Lack of Wifi, but can use EyeFi Cards
  • Still can only do second curtain flash with Canon flashes
  • We expected much more highlight recovery
  • Not a lot of lenses can resolve 50MP very well

Buy now: $1,299.99

Captured with the Sony A7R IV

Pro Tip: You can capture images that are bursting at the seams with detail with high-resolution cameras, but don’t forget that these megapixel warriors will produce file sizes that will blow your mind. RAW images, like the one above from the Sony a7r IV, will have a file size of roughly 60mb, and images from the Fujifilm GFX 100 are over 100mb. If you shoot with cameras like this make sure you have plenty of spare SD cards. Trust us when we say you’re going to go through them quickly.

Panasonic S1R – 47.3 Megapixels

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Good image quality
  • Decent autofocus, but not great by any stretch
  • Weather sealing throughout the body and the lenses
  • Direct buttons to get you exactly what you want
  • We really like the top LCD screen

Cons

  • The buttons and switches can probably get in the way of your shooting unless you thoroughly memorize them
  • It’s big, and it gets bigger when you put a lens on it
  • Abysmal battery life

Buy now: $3,697.99

Pentax K1 Mk II – 36.4 Megapixels

High-Resolution Cameras

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Enough weather sealing to last a lifetime
  • Rock-solid build quality
  • Easy to read LCD Screen
  • In-Body Image Stabilization / Pixel Shift
  • Gorgeous 100% coverage viewfinder
  • Excellent image quality
  • Dual SD Card slots
  • Great battery life
  • That little light above the lens mount

Cons

  • Only 33 focus points
  • Autofocus system won’t win any races
  • Extremely heavy
  • No touchscreen

Buy now: $1,679

The Hasselblad X1D II – 50 Megapixels

High-Resolution Cameras

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • It has a gorgeous design
  • The touchscreen is the best in the business
  • The user interface is, again, the best in the business
  • Image quality is simply stunning
  • Incredible build quality second to none
  • The resolution of the EVF and rear LCD are excellent
  • Great weather sealing

Cons

  • Only contrast detection for autofocus
  • Autofocusing in low light is not a thing
  • The autofocus on this camera is incredibly slow by modern standards, even in excellent lighting conditions
  • No eye or face detect, and no continuous focus modes
  • No rear joystick or thumbpad to choose focus points

Buy now: $5,750

Canon EOS R – 30.3 Megapixels

High-Resolution Cameras

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Build quality
  • Weather sealed like crazy
  • Autofocus is good
  • Protects the sensor when off
  • Canon’s menu system is still simple
  • Ergonomics feel nice
  • With a lightweight lens, it feels just as nice as a Sony camera
  • These are some of Canon’s best RAW files in years
  • Good battery life
  • Fast Wi-Fi transfers, though not as simple as Sony’s

Cons

  • Needs Dual SD cards
  • Needs a joystick
  • The magic touch bar is odd and could use refinement
  • Optimizing the way the ISO, aperture, and shutter speed dials work, such as the automatic remetering for ISO, not cool
  • Canon needs to improve or change their face and eye detection
  • Bigger than Sony, but the L lenses are about on par with their G Master glass

Buy now: $1.799

High-Resolution Cameras
Captured with the Fujifilm GFX 50R

Pro Tip: High-resolution cameras are fantastic, but they can be a little more tricky to use. Features like IBIS can go a long way in helping you get tack sharp images, but there is no substitute for a sturdy tripod, and you’re going to need one if you want to get the most out of these huge sensors. Not sure where to start when buying a tripod? Check out our review section. We have reviewed dozens of tripods, and our real-world tests will help you make a great choice.

Fujifilm GFX 50R – 51.4 Megapixels

High-Resolution Cameras

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Great image quality
  • Excellent high ISO output
  • High-speed sync with the Profoto Air system is a delight
  • Autofocus isn’t all that bad
  • Weather sealing is top-notch
  • Lightweight
  • Not that large overall
  • The ergonomics are very good

Cons

  • The autofocus could still use some revamps

Buy now: $3,499

Nikon z7 – 45.7 Megapixels

High-Resolution Cameras

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Good feeling in the hand
  • Solid weather sealing
  • Lots of focusing points
  • Good high ISO output
  • Lots of resolution
  • A touch screen
  • Image stabilization is very good
  • The viewfinder is beautiful
  • We genuinely appreciate the top LCD screen
  • Outstanding battery life

Cons

  • Little things annoy us, like not being able to push the joystick in to bring the focusing point back to the center
  • Why the hell is there an XQD card slot?
  • We’d really prefer dual card slots
  • Did we mention the autofocus isn’t up to par?
  • Nikon created a brand new camera system and yet they decided to keep the single most awkward mounting system that, like their DSLRs, requires you to screw the lenses into the left instead of to the right like LITERALLY EVERYONE ELSE DOES!
  • The muscle memory learning curve is steeper than with other cameras

Buy now: $3,396.95

Brett Day

Brett Day is the Gear Editor at The Phoblographer and has been a photographer for as long as he can remember. Brett has his own photography business that focuses on corporate events and portraiture. In his spare time, Brett loves to practice landscape and wildlife photography. When he's not behind a camera, he's enjoying life with his wife and two kids, or he's playing video games, drinking coffee, and eating Cheetos.