5 Affordable Full Frame Cameras for Professional Photographers

A follow up was requested by a reader who told us that Full Frame cameras can be just as cheap as the APS-C cameras we mentioned in another roundup.

After a recent post about APS-C cameras that are used by professional photographers, we were contacted by a reader who wanted to point out that there are Full Frame cameras that can be picked up for around the same price as the most expensive APS-C cameras we listed. This is indeed true, but there are few to choose from. However, if Full Frame cameras are the ultimate goal for you, but you don’t want to shell out much more than $1,500, the Full Frame cameras in this roundup are worth checking out. We’ll take a look at five affordable Full Frame cameras after the break.

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We guarantee the APS-C cameras listed in this roundup will do a fantastic job for many. But if the pull of Frame Frame is too strong for you to resist, or if the type of photography you shoot requires Full Frame cameras, you have some options arond the $1,500 mark.

Portrait photographers, landscape photographers, and those who shoot in a lot of low light conditions will see benefits from Full Frame cameras. The cameras listed below are great performing Full Frame cameras with excellent high ISO performance, solid build, have great lens selections available, and pack a lot of the features found in more expensive bodies. Check out these five great Full Frame cameras that can be used by professional photographers on a budget.

 

Canon EOS RP

 

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • This isn’t Canon innovating on the inside, but instead on the outside
  • This is the smallest and lightest ILC full-frame camera on the market
  • Goes well with a wrist strap and a light prime lens
  • Weather sealing
  • The autofocus isn’t bad, and it’s quite usable in a number of working conditions
  • Pretty good image quality

Cons

  • This camera is begging to be paired with a nice 50mm f1.8 lens.
  • Could have done better with a joystick

Buy now ($1,299): Adorama

 

Canon 6D Mk II

 

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Nice feel to the camera body, though it’s now starting to feel more like the Canon 5D Mk III than the Canon 5D Mk II
  • Weather sealing
  • Pretty fair color versatility
  • The flippy LCD screen is a nice touch
  • You can push the shadows quite a bit, though don’t expect Sony performance
  • Great battery life
  • Very good high ISO performance; we made a print at 13×17 inches from an ISO 6400 photo
  • Canon’s Touch screen menu continues to be the best on the market
  • Canon’s rendition of skin tones continues to be the best on the market

Cons

  • No 4K video means that the long term value of a camera like this is null as the last time this camera was updated was maybe four or five years ago
  • Subpar highlight rendition recovery (update, In Capture One, it isn’t that bad)
  • Autofocus points all towards the center
  • Slow autofocus with Sigma lenses
  • You’re so much better off just using the center focus point and recomposing
  • 26MP is a bit too conservative when there are fantastic 24MP APS-C sensors
  • Lower ISOs don’t feel as versatile as the higher ISO settings
  • A single card slot

Buy now ($1,299): Adorama

 

Pro Tip: No matter what gear you use, if you want it to last, and if you want it to perform at its peak for many years to come, you need to take care of it. We know, cleaning is not the most fun thing to do, but it is one of the most important. Cleaning your camera and lenses doesn’t take long, and you don’t need a big fancy cleaning kit to do it. A basic cleaning kit suffices for getting rid of grease, dirt, and dust that has started to call your camera home. Take care of your gear and it will take care of you.

 

Sony A7 MK II

 

Sony full frame cameras

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Image stabilization is pretty effective
  • Improved grip, though there wasn’t much of a problem with the first
  • Improved battery life performance with the same batteries that every other Sony mirrorless camera uses
  • Better autofocusing than we’ve seen in previous versions in that it acquires a subject faster than before

Cons

  • Slow startup time
  • Not a whole host of differences from the A7

Buy now ($1,398): Adorama

 

Nikon D750

 

Nikon full frame cameras

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Deep grip
  • The intuitive and well laid out control scheme
  • Renders amazing detail and color
  • Clean files at ISO 6400
  • Usable images up to ISO 10000
  • Built-in Wi-Fi transmission
  • Tilting screen

Cons

  • Plastic front plate

Buy now ($1,496.95): Adorama

 

Pro Tip: Full Frame, APS-C, Micro Four Thirds – they all have one thing in common: they use SD Cards. Cameras these days can generate large RAW files, which means you need to be prepared to deal with all of that extra data. Some of the cameras we have listed are also capable of using two memory cards as well, so you will need to stock up on storage for several reasons. Fortunately, SD cards are ridiculously cheap these days, and they are fast and reliable. Do yourself a favor and keep extras in your camera bag, your pocket, or your vehicle so you can be sure you’re covered.

 

Pentax K1 Mk II

 

full frame cameras

Here are the pros and cons from our full review:

Pros

  • Enough weather sealing to last a lifetime
  • Rock-solid build quality
  • Easy to read LCD Screen
  • In-Body Image Stabilization / Pixel Shift
  • Gorgeous 100% coverage viewfinder
  • Excellent image quality
  • Dual SD Card slots
  • Great battery life
  • That little light above the lens mount

Cons

  • Only 33 focus points
  • Autofocus system won’t win any races
  • Extremely heavy
  • No touchscreen

Buy now ($1,796.95): Adorama