Fujfilm’s Fun Underwater Cameras Will be Discontinued on March 31st

Fujifilm Underwater Cameras
If you want a fun, disposable camera that you can take swimming you need to act fast because the end is nigh for Fujifilm underwater cameras.

Summer vacations are always fun and being able to take pictures in the pool can help make those memories last a lifetime. Fujifilm underwater cameras have been go to cameras for many people from vacationers, to photographers who are looking to get a little creative with their work. They have always been affordable, and reliable, but this March they will be discontinued. 

This news comes to us from sources within both Fujifilm and retailers. The reasoning? Well, they’ve got no more ISO 800 film.

Super cheap, fun 35mm disposable cameras are always a blast to use. I always remember using them as a child, and I used to be so excited when the pictures were ready to pick up, but times have changed. These cameras are unfortunately falling by the wayside now, and the latest casualty seems to be the Quicksnap Fujifilm Underwater cameras that so many water loving photographers have used in the past.

 

The Fujifilm Quicksnap Waterproof cameras come pre-loaded with 800 speed color film which is good for 27 exposures. These little 35mm cameras will work just fine up to depths of 17ft, so if you hand one to a younger photographer in your family you can be safe in the knowledge that if it’s dropped in the deep end it will be just fine. Remember though, after March 31st these fun little cameras will be discontinued, and that’s a real shame.

These cameras can be used for more than just vacation pictures though. If you have been wanting to play around with photography involving water these would be a good way to break into that genre. At the very least they will be able to give you a feel for what it’s like to make images either partially or fully submerged in water. There will no doubt be some amazing opportunities to create some very unique images.

Snap some of these Fujifilm underwater cameras up before they’re gone for good; and before another nail gets driven in the film photography grave.