Film Photography Matters Because Black and White Still Matters

There is a whole generation of photographers who still haven’t experienced film photography

At a time where photography has evolved in leaps and bounds in digital advancements, why do some people still choose to shoot with film? Why does this obsolete technology persist? There are a hundred reasons a film photographer today will tell you, but Ian Wong of Digital Darkroom has a rather interesting view to it: film photography matters because black and white still matters.

Ian dropped this thought against the equally interesting shopping scene of Tokyo’s Ginza and Akihabara districts in the latest episode of Digital Darkroom. To document his explorations, he loaded his Contax T3 with two special rolls of black and white films: Kodak Tri-X 400 and JCH Street Pan 400. He shared many other thoughts that analog lovers can definitely relate to, so I’ll let you hear them from him straight in this video.

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New Kickstarter Project Inspires Photographers to Follow in Dorothea Lange’s Footsteps

All images by Kenneth Wajda via Kickstarter

In the spirit of documentary photography from the era of Dorothea Lange, photographer and photojournalist Kenneth Wajda aims to create a photo book of documentary images that will introduce America to the Americans. The inspiration behind it is the initiative of Roy Stryker: the economist, government official, and photographer who commissioned Lange, among others, as part of the documentary photography movement of the Farm Security Administration (FSA).

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Developing Color Films at Home is Easier than You Think

Screenshot image from the video by Jonathan Notley

If you’ve always wanted to learn how to develop your own color negative films at home but feel it’s too complicated, There are actually plenty of resources out there that will tell you it’s actually pretty easy. Part of the misconception is brought by the fact that it needs three chemicals (developer, bleach, fixer, or developer, bleach + fixer, stabilizer) instead of two (developer and fixer) for black and white developing. To show you how it’s easier than you think, English photographer Jonathan Notley has recently made a video tutorial for developing color films using Tetenal Colortec C41 chemicals.

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Jamie Saechao: Striving for Elegance in Wedding Photography

All images by text by Jamie Saechao. Used with permission.

I fell in love with photography while working at a job I absolutely hated! Sometimes you have to find what you don’t love to do in order to discover what your true calling is. I needed a creative outlet and photography allowed me to express myself, connect with others, and feel alive again. I especially loved connecting with other women, celebrating their beauty, and building confidence through portraiture.

I strive to create images that are elegant, timeless, and romantic. I feel most accomplished when I’ve created a portrait that makes someone stop and look a second time… although to be honest I think those images come to you, in the midst of creating. It’s something you have to wait patiently for.

I have also found great joy in documenting nature on film…there is a certain joy in capturing the beauty and simplicity of combining the two!

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5 Compact Film Cameras Used by Professional Photographers Today

Compact film cameras are a great thing for any photographer to be able to throw in their bag. More often than not, they’re more durable than digital cameras and they use good old film–which is bound to give you great results you cannot get with digital if you’re doing it right. Believe it or not, there are professional photographers who today still use some film cameras in order to get a different look from what everyone else is doing out there. The results are often fantastic and even the likes of VICE have done projects where they’ve given disposable cameras to photographers for special situations. Indeed, these cameras are still very good and if a professional photographer can create great results with them, there is no reason why you can’t.

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George Muncey Shoots Large Format Portraits for Dickies

Today, the distinct look of film photography is sought after not only by ardent film shooters and professional photographers looking for alternate mediums, but apparently by brands as well. It’s not even limited to independent brands anymore, as George Muncey of Negative Feedback proves with a recent large format portrait shoot for Dickies.

The highlight of George’s shoot, without a doubt, is that he used his new Chamonix 8×10 large format camera equipped with a Nikkor 300mm f5.6. This impressive view camera is a handmade piece of art in itself, sporting a modern design and constructed using wood and carbon fiber composite material. Shooting large format is certainly a thrilling experience, and using it to do a project with one of his favorite brands was the perfect opportunity for George’s first large format series.

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Shooting Film with the Metz 45-CL4 Flash Looks Awesome

If film is your chosen medium and flash photography is something you’re yet to try, we have something that may be of interest to you. Sure, you could be shooting with your camera’s built-in flash. But it’s worth watching what it’s like to shoot film with an impressive-looking handle mount flash. George Muncey of UK-based film photography website Negative Feedback gives us a demonstration of shooting his favorite flash, the  Metz 45-CL4 Flash.
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