Film Emulsion Review: Lomography Color Negative 800 (35mm and 120)

Of all the color negative films Lomography sells, my consistent favorite has to be Lomography Color Negative 800. As the company’s highest ISO color negative film, you should expect to get good colors and some amazingly warm skin tones if you’re into that sort of thing. The film is designed for photographers who need a fast film for a variety of reasons. In some ways, I find it to be in-between both Kodak Portra 800 and Fujifilm Superia 800. Where the latter was the bread and butter for photojournalists for years, Kodak Portra 800 is instead meant for portraits in low light–but I’ve seen it capture some stellar Northern Lights photos. Lomography Color Negative 800 on the other hand works pretty swimmingly for both.

I’ve been testing and using Lomography Color Negative 800 on and off for the past few years in a variety of cameras. I can say with all certainty that it’s probably my favorite alternative to CineStill 800T when shooting at night.

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The New Elbaflex is a Nikon F Mount SLR That Takes 35mm Film

The Ihagee Elbaflex is the first new Nikon F Mount Film SLR camera that we’ve seen in a while

It’s time to get excited about film all over again; the new Ihagee Elbaflex film SLR is going to be launching next week on Kickstarter. This camera joins a number of other analog film related products that have been in the works. So what’s so special about the Ihagee Elbaflex?

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Quick Tips For Getting the Most Out Of Your 35mm Lens For Portraits

The photographer using a 35mm lens for portraits will want to listen up!

The 35mm focal length has long been an incredibly popular focal length choice for photographers of all genres and niches, but particularly of portrait photographers. This has especially been the case in the last several year’s thanks to the introduction of great third-party options from companies like Sigma and Tamron which manage to control distortion, fringing, and other optical issues to produce images that are sharp and offer solid contrast.

But what if you are new to the 35mm focal length, maybe you are used to something with a bit more reach like a 50mm or an even more classic portrait lens option like an 85mm or 135mm? If you need some tips on how to make the 35mm focal length work well for you when you are shooting portraits then this post is one you will want to see. Continue reading…

Similar but Different, the 28mm vs 35mm Debate

 

It is a question you may have found yourself asking at some point over the years: 28mm or 35mm? These are two focal lengths that render somewhat similar fields of view, have similar distortion characteristics and are generally around the same size. So, what is the point? Why would one choose to go with 35mm over 28mm, or 28mm over 35mm? That is what we are here to discuss today! Continue reading…

The Reflex Manual Film SLR Will Hit Kickstarter Soon

The Reflex camera is almost here, it will be funded via Kickstarter

We told you all about Reflex, the project to develop and produce the first all manual film SLR in almost two decades, a little over a month ago. Since that time information about the project has been thin, but a new report is now pegging a Kickstarter launch in the very near future. Continue reading…

Film Review: Lomography Lady Grey 400 Black and White (35mm and 120)

With Lomography Lady Grey 400 Black and White film, photographers have yet another choice for black and white film photography. Indeed, the look that it delivers is also something pretty special. It’s not quite Ilford Delta, not at all like Kodak Tri-X 400, doesn’t even work like Agfa APX 400 and looks nothing really like Ilford HP5. Instead Lomography repackages film from FomaPan for Lomography Lady Grey 400, but earlier emulsions were apparently Kodak T-Max 400. The film has been on the market for a number of years now and has received not only a revamp but also more and more praise as we’ve delved deeper into the analog film photography world. With that said, I can say with confidence that Lomography Lady Grey 400 can be used to get great effects by many photographers out there for a variety of reasons.

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We’ve Updated Our CineStill 800T Review; Now Includes 120 Emulsion Tests

Hey folks,

This is an update to tell you we’ve finished reviewing CineStill 800T in both 35mm and 120. Our CineStill 800T Review has been updated accordingly. Besides obviously being a larger format of the film, we find CineStill 800T to be more forgiving with actual daylight. CineStill 800T is a tungsten based film and for that reason I believe it to be best for indoor usage and nighttime photography. It remains, in my mind, to be one of the best color films out there at the moment.

For the uninitiated, CineStill 800T is a tungsten film. It’s more or less Kodak Movie Film that was reformatted for C41 film processing. And it clearly delivers a look digital can’t give us.

Why Shooting Large Format Makes it So Hard to Go Back to 35mm

After shooting 35mm for a number of years I was intrigued by the higher resolution, and richer images produced by medium format cameras. I was a sucker for that ratio you get from a 6×7 negative too, but after seeing Joel Meyerowitz’ book Between the Dog and Wolf, my intrigue in larger formats began to build. “Why go medium when you can go large,” I thought? So I took the plunge, started researching eBay and the Large Format Photography forum (a great resource), and managed to find a kit for sale.

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