Do You Know the Reciprocal Rule of Shutter Speeds?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

There is a great way to get more stable images without worrying about image stabilization from your lens or camera: it’s called the reciprocal rule of shutter speeds. SLR Lounge recently published a video all about it, which is after the jump.

The reciprocal rule of shutter speeds states that:

  • In order to achieve a stable image that is devoid of camera shake, you must shoot at a shutter speed that is the reciprocal of the minimum of the field of view.
  • What does that mean? If you’re using a 100mm lens on a full frame 35mm sensor/film body, then you need to shoot at at least 1/100th to produce an image that contains no camera shake when shooting handheld.
  • If you’re shooting with a 100mm lens on an APS-C sensor that has a 1.5x crop factor, then you need to shoot at 1/150th at a minimum. Here, the crop factor is taking into consideration.
  • If you’re shooting with a 100mm lens on an APS-C sensor that has a 1.6x crop factor, then you need to shoot at 1/160th at a minimum. Here the crop factor is also taken into consideration.
  • Micro Four Thirds shooters need to shoot with a 100mm lens at a minimum of 1/200th because of the crop factor.

The SLR Lounge video below visually demonstrates this idea.

Chris Gampat

Chris Gampat is the Editor in Chief, Founder, and Publisher of the Phoblographer. He also likes pizza.