Video: Joel Meyerowitz on Creating Unspoken Connections in His Street Snaps

Screenshot taken from the video

At a time when everyone has the means to dive into street photography, how do you make your photos different from everyone else’s? Joel Meyerowitz, another legendary name in the field, offers an insightful answer. As a New York City snapper, he’s a renowned pioneer of color street photography at a time when it was deemed amateur, and celebrated for his candid photographs that show his sharp observation skills. Meyerowitz’s frames are filled with people captured at the right place and the right time. It’s definitely a nod to the style of the photography legends who inspired him: Henri Cartier-Bresson and his decisive moment, Robert Frank and his famous documentary work on the American society, and Eugene Atget’s definitive work documenting Paris at the cusp of modernization.

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Bruce Gilden Explains What Makes a Great Street Photograph

Screenshot taken from the video

Magnum photographer Bruce Gilden himself spent decades perfecting his signature style of filling the frame with candid close-up portraits, making him one of the revered – and often imitated – street photographers in that arena. With street photography being one of the most popular categories today, it’s one of those genres many photographers take a stab at, albeit mostly blindly. To make things extra challenging, there are really no hard and fast rules you can follow to guarantee a compelling street snap; all those guides and photo books can give you is something you can start with. What you can do, however, is diligently and persistently practice until you get your own style, voice, and storytelling technique.

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Six Film Emulsions to Travel With on Your Next Trip (and a Few Recommended Cameras)

Lots of photographers are wary of bringing film with them on their next airplane trip, but the experienced photographers have learned how to do it. Sure, your phone, a good point and shoot, or a small ILC camera will work great but there is something absolutely unique about what film will do for the experience. Typically, folks love to look at and fall in love with their travel photos as soon as possible. But when you delay that otherwise instant gratification just a bit, you’ll be much more thoroughly surprised later on. Even if you shoot instant film, there’s still a Je Ne Sais Quoi about that moment that enhances the experience.

Here are a few of our favorite film emulsions

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10 Tips on How to Get Your Photography Exhibited

Featured image pulled from video featured below. Credit to Shutterbug and Jordan Matter

When you are getting into photography there are some things that many aspiring photographers dream about accomplishing; for some that something is like getting published in a big name magazine; for others, that something is like having their work exhibited at a gallery. Both are lofty goals, but today we are going to take a look at the latter. Jordan Matter recently teamed up with Shutterbug to put together this great video featuring 10 tips on how to get your photography exhibited, and it offers some great advice!

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Useful Photography Tip #179: The Golden Rules of Working with Film

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When it comes to working with film, there are a number of photographers who have obviously done it for years already. But interestingly enough, you don’t apply the same techniques necessarily that you would with digital photography. So here’s what you can do and the Golden Rules of Working with Film Photography:

  • Slide film: Expose for the highlights, but personally I like to overexpose just a tad due to the way that I light.
  • Color Negative film: Overexpose the film by around a stop. I’ve found great success in then developing normally.
  • Black and White: Lots of photographers like exposing for the shadows and developing for the highlights. Personally, I tend to shoot a lot of black and white film the box speed or giving it a bit more light or less light depending on my personal tastes. But with some films, you may not want to underexpose them–like Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400 which is a near infrared film that needs a lot of light.

That’s it! Good luck!

The 7 Best 35mm Lenses for Portrait Photography

While the 35mm focal length isn’t always considered to be prime (pun not intended) for portraiture, it’s still fairly popular and a very versatile focal length. In fact, because it’s got a field of view that is the way that so many photographers see, it’s bound to be a favorite focal length. Luckily, over the years a number of those lenses have improved to simply just become better. So if you’re looking for a 35mm lens for portraiture, look no further than our favorites in this list.

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Video: How Amateur Photographers Can Take Better Pictures (Without Buying a New Camera)

Lots of folks consider themselves hobbyists and amateur photographers–and they always wonder how they can take better pictures. Lucky for those folks, The Project Photography came up with a number of great tips the advanced photographers use and consider (because of course they have experience) but that others may not. Even those more experienced in photography may find something they have forgotten about.

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In Camera Double Exposure? Here Are 4 Great Cameras To Consider!

Double Exposures, in the original meaning, was when a photographer exposed a frame of film twice. When done by accident the results were likely bad, but when done artistically, with forethought and intent, the results could be really special. Obviously these days with digital sensors there is no frame to expose twice, so our cameras must be programmed to mimic this. Some rely on photoshop to mimic this effect, but for many, getting it in camera is the preferred method.

As noted above, not all cameras offer such functionality. So if this is a feature you are looking for, which cameras should you be considering? Here are some great camera options that we would recommend.  Continue reading…