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It looks like the Fujifilm X100s is about to get an update of some sort very soon. Mirrorless Rumors got a hold of evidence allegedly leaked by photographer David Hobby. the EXIF data of some of the images (which were now taken down)  state that they’re from a new camera called the X100T. This sort of makes sense, as it’s the next letter in the alphabet. However, the S in the nomenclature stood for speed–and we’re not sure what T could stand for.

Fuji Rumors is stating that the camera will boast a 24MP APS-C sensor with faster AF, a new fixed lens, a tilting screen, a new EVF, and a wider phase detection area. These are all upgrades that the X100s needed since the lens attached to the camera was more or less the same as the X100–and the larger megapixels need to work with a newer lens for more resolution.

It’s about time for an X100s update anyway since there have been no major firmware updates to the camera in a while. We’re just going to have to wait and see what comes this way.

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According to a new Sony patent found by Sony Alpha Rumors, the company is trying to eliminate rolling shutter completely. The company first started to talk about this when they announced the RX10: and their method was to eliminate rolling shutter and issues by outputting the entire sensor readout pixel for pixel. However, it’s easier for them to do this with a 1-inch sensor.

For the uninformed, rolling shutter is a video issue that occurs due to what’s known as line skipping. By that, when the camera reads a scene, it takes out individual lines of information. This is different from Global Shutter: which in the entire frame is used.

Sony’s new tactic in the new sensor design pictured above is to read the entire plane four lines at a time. What they’re also claiming is that high ISO noise will be reduced and dynamic range will be increased.

While this will greatly help them in the video market, many of the pros still seem to reach for Arri and Canon camcorders–and Sony is going to have to find a way to get them back. Back around 2005-2009, Sony had most of the pro market. Since the Canon 5D Mk II was released, Canon took it and continued to build on it with the 1DC, C300, C500, and the 5D Mk III. Further hacks from Magic Lantern made some of the cameras even better. But Sony has been making attempts at fighting back through the A7s and a couple of other products.

It may be too early to see this technology at Photokina just yet, but we’re sure that we’ll be hearing about it some time down the line.

Chris Gampat the Phoblographer Sony Rx100 Mk III and Canon G1x Mk II comparison (6 of 7)ISO 400001-60 sec at f - 1.8

Two of this year’s best point and shoot cameras are the Canon G1X Mk II and the Sony RX100 Mk III. Both cameras share a decorated lineage and both are aimed at the enthusiast that wants a pocket camera with a large sensor.

But just which one is better?

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Sony A7s sensor

Yes! It’s one of those days again where our friends from DxOMark release another sensor test, and this time it’s the one of the new Sony A7S. Just yesterday, we reported on Michael Reichmann’s first impressions review of the A7S, and he was so bold as to claim that the camera exhibits medium format-like image quality. Well, according to DxOMark, things aren’t quite as shiny. Head past the break for more.

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When Sony’s A77 was released, ti was very highly regarded by many photographers. So when Sony announced their A77 Mk II, the world knew that they had to find a way to outdo not only that camera but lots of the other flagship APS-C competition. DxOMark announced the results of their sensor lab tests today, and apparently it’s slightly worse than the Nikon D7100 and above the Pentax K3. From the results, it has the worst ISO performance of the three–which makes us believe that it is a very similar if not the same sensor in the new A6000 mirrorless camera (review here).

Nikon seems to be leading the pack though with only slightly worse color depth than the other two.

All three cameras have 1.5x crop APS-C sensors and of course this test only shows the sensor performance. The K3 and D7100 are both very hefty tanks of cameras. In fact, we ran the K3 under water and it survived.

For more, you can check out our Pentax K3 and Nikon D7100 reviews. We have only had first impressions with the A77 Mk II so far though, and when we’ve completed the review a four way comparison will be done.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 135mm f2 review images (5 of 11)ISO 1001-125 sec at f - 3.2

Whether you’re shooting during the summer or winter, the sun’s rays can always be bent to your will when shooting portraits of people outside using natural light. In order to get the most of the sun’s abilities and also take the most advantage of what your camera and lens are capable of, here are some items that we think you really need.

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