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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss Rokinon Sigma 85mm f1.4 three way comparison (2 of 3)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 3.5

With the very recent announcement of the Canon 5Ds and Canon 5Ds R, the industry has taken a huge step forward. A camera with a sensor that can shoot over 50MP images in the 35mm format is changing the game completely. But with that, we’re always wondering about lenses. A while ago, we asked Lens manufacturers about how lens technology will be able to keep up with sensor technology.

But to find out what lenses could potentially work with such a high megapixel sensor, we did some research and asking around. As we get more information, we will try to update this list.

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X-A2_Tilt_Front_Brown

Fujifilm is today announcing a couple of new additions to their camera lineup. And when it comes to their new X-A2 and the XQ-2, they’re putting a big emphasis on taking selfies.

No, we’re not kidding.

The new Fujifilm X-A2 has a 175 degree tilting LCD screen so that you can see your beautiful bug before you shoot yourself in the face with that 16.3MP APS-C sensor. It’s being bundled with the new Fujifilm XC 16-50mm f3.5-5.6 II OIS zoom lens complete with seven aperture blades and delivering up to 3.5 stops of stabilization. The camera also sports the company’s Eye-AF, Macro AF, and multi-target AF modes.

But it’s not alone! It’s being joined by the new XQ2–housing a 12MP 2/3 X-Trans CMOS II sensor with phase detection and the EXR II processor. There are even more cameras being announced too. Hit the jump for more.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony A7 Mk II first impressions (24 of 29)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 2.2

Meet Sony’s 4th full frame mirrorless interchangeable lens camera: the Sony A7 Mk II. The camera is sort of being billed as the successor to the A7: which was (and still is) the perfect balance of high ISO output and resolution right in the middle. But Sony has come out with a few new changes to the camera with the biggest one being the addition of image stabilization to the sensor. Other changes added in are the inclusion of more autofocus points, ergonomic changes to the grip, and a couple of additions for video shooters.

Sony brought the New York press out on an excursion to play with the new camera in different environments. And while the A7 Mk II is capable of doing some really cool stuff, we’re not sure that everyone needs it–or at least that’s what we think so far.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic GM5 first impressions images (4 of 5)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 5.0

Want more useful photography tips? Click here.

While this tip may seem completely obvious to those of us that have been shooting for years, we encourage you to pay it forward and share this with those that are newer to interchangeable lens photography.

This is the story of two different people who took the lens off of their camera and put the camera in their one pocket and the lens in their other pocket.

Again: I’m going to repeat that.

This is the story of two different people who took the lens off of their camera and put the camera in their one pocket and the lens in their other pocket.

If you’re a veteran shooter, you know much better than to do this–or at least you know to use a body cap and a lens back cap. But for the less initiated, doing this makes cloth, debris and dust get right onto your camera sensor and at the back of the lens. In both cases, the camera was taking photos with spots in the image and the lens wasn’t working. Why?

Imagine a person putting little bits of dust in your eyes. Would you be able to see? Probably not–and neither can your camera since the sensor is very much like the eye. Then also imagine putting on dirty glasses. Obviously, seeing wouldn’t be the easiest thing to do. That’s what happens when you put a dirty lens on your camera.

But even further, the second person got so much dust on the contacts that the lens couldn’t autofocus. If you want to fix a problem like this, use Isopropyl alcohol or use a special brush to clean the sensor.

And make sure that you maintain your camera. But whatever you do, always protect your camera’s sensor.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony A6000 product images (3 of 9)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 11

Something that we didn’t ever think would be possible is apparently being made by Sony right now. The most innovative company in the photo world has put in a patent to be able to set the individual exposure parameters at the pixel level instead of the sensor level–or at least that’s what Sony Alpha Rumors is stating.

The new Sony patent clearly discloses this. Apparently, it seems to work by assigning the pixels specific roles to be able to accomplish something like this. In theory, this would mean that it would work best with a higher resolution sensor but that it also means that cleaner image quality could potentially comes from the images. It would also require a ton of processing power and Sony batteries are already being quickly drained of power from the EVF and LCD.

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Felix Esser The Phoblographer Lenses Apertures

Consumers who are always concerned about when their camera will become outdated should not only be aware of the technology that has been progressing in sensor performance, but also whether or not lens R&D will be able to keep up. A question dawned on us one day: with sensor technology moving ahead at such a fast pace, will lens technology be able to do the same? Years ago, it was common for a lens to last a photographer 10 years until the next refresh. But in more recent years, we’ve been seeing shorter lifespans of around five years. Part of this is due to developments in autofocusing and sensor technology.

But at the same time, should photographers be afraid that their collection of glass will become obsolete? We talked to the folks at Olympus, Fujifilm, Panasonic, Sigma and Tokina about this.

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