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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony A7 Mk II first impressions (24 of 29)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 2.2

Meet Sony’s 4th full frame mirrorless interchangeable lens camera: the Sony A7 Mk II. The camera is sort of being billed as the successor to the A7: which was (and still is) the perfect balance of high ISO output and resolution right in the middle. But Sony has come out with a few new changes to the camera with the biggest one being the addition of image stabilization to the sensor. Other changes added in are the inclusion of more autofocus points, ergonomic changes to the grip, and a couple of additions for video shooters.

Sony brought the New York press out on an excursion to play with the new camera in different environments. And while the A7 Mk II is capable of doing some really cool stuff, we’re not sure that everyone needs it–or at least that’s what we think so far.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic GM5 first impressions images (4 of 5)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 5.0

Want more useful photography tips? Click here.

While this tip may seem completely obvious to those of us that have been shooting for years, we encourage you to pay it forward and share this with those that are newer to interchangeable lens photography.

This is the story of two different people who took the lens off of their camera and put the camera in their one pocket and the lens in their other pocket.

Again: I’m going to repeat that.

This is the story of two different people who took the lens off of their camera and put the camera in their one pocket and the lens in their other pocket.

If you’re a veteran shooter, you know much better than to do this–or at least you know to use a body cap and a lens back cap. But for the less initiated, doing this makes cloth, debris and dust get right onto your camera sensor and at the back of the lens. In both cases, the camera was taking photos with spots in the image and the lens wasn’t working. Why?

Imagine a person putting little bits of dust in your eyes. Would you be able to see? Probably not–and neither can your camera since the sensor is very much like the eye. Then also imagine putting on dirty glasses. Obviously, seeing wouldn’t be the easiest thing to do. That’s what happens when you put a dirty lens on your camera.

But even further, the second person got so much dust on the contacts that the lens couldn’t autofocus. If you want to fix a problem like this, use Isopropyl alcohol or use a special brush to clean the sensor.

And make sure that you maintain your camera. But whatever you do, always protect your camera’s sensor.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony A6000 product images (3 of 9)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 11

Something that we didn’t ever think would be possible is apparently being made by Sony right now. The most innovative company in the photo world has put in a patent to be able to set the individual exposure parameters at the pixel level instead of the sensor level–or at least that’s what Sony Alpha Rumors is stating.

The new Sony patent clearly discloses this. Apparently, it seems to work by assigning the pixels specific roles to be able to accomplish something like this. In theory, this would mean that it would work best with a higher resolution sensor but that it also means that cleaner image quality could potentially comes from the images. It would also require a ton of processing power and Sony batteries are already being quickly drained of power from the EVF and LCD.

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Felix Esser The Phoblographer Lenses Apertures

Consumers who are always concerned about when their camera will become outdated should not only be aware of the technology that has been progressing in sensor performance, but also whether or not lens R&D will be able to keep up. A question dawned on us one day: with sensor technology moving ahead at such a fast pace, will lens technology be able to do the same? Years ago, it was common for a lens to last a photographer 10 years until the next refresh. But in more recent years, we’ve been seeing shorter lifespans of around five years. Part of this is due to developments in autofocusing and sensor technology.

But at the same time, should photographers be afraid that their collection of glass will become obsolete? We talked to the folks at Olympus, Fujifilm, Panasonic, Sigma and Tokina about this.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic LX100 first impressions product images (4 of 6)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 4.5

It’s been rumored for a very long time, and today Panasonic and the Micro Four Thirds world have launched their direct competitor to the large sensor point and shoots. The Panasonic LX100 is not only directly squared against the other high end point and shoots out there, but it is also the company’s dueling sword to Fujifilm’s X100T.

At its heart is a Micro Four Thirds size sensor (the same 12.8MP sensor in the GX7) with a lens that starts at f1.7 (24mm) and ends at f2.8 (75mm) in its zoom range. The lens has Power OIS too–which is very typical for Panasonic. The camera has has the same processing engine as the GH4–which makes is truly a composite camera.

We got to spend some time with the LX100 at Panasonic’s New Jersey headquarters earlier this month. And trust us, it’s a reason to get hyped.

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Pictured here is the DP2. At the moment of publishing this article, photos of the DP1 were not available.

Pictured here is the DP2. At the moment of publishing this article, photos of the DP1 were not available.

Sigma has shown commitment to odd ergonomic design in their announcement today detailing the new DP1 Quattro. To refresh, the DP2 Quattro was their first entry into this series. Sticking to Sigma tradition, the company’s DP1 has a wide angle 28mm equivalent f2.8 lens in front of the new Foveon Quattro sensor. Said lens unit houses one FLD element and two glass mold aspherical elements.

Just like the previous Quattro Foveon sensor, expect loads and loads of details to be rendered from the images. To see just how much, you can check out our review of the dp2 Quattro here.

Sigma states that the DP1 Quattro will feature better battery life, a TRUE III imaging processor, better ISO performance (they claim up to two tops of improvement), better autofocus, improved white balance, new color modes and better metering when it comes to auto exposures. .

But in addition to the camera, the company is also announcing a new LVF for the series with a diopter adjustment of -2 to +1. It magnifies the LCD screen 2.5x.

We have no word on pricing yet, but expect it to hit the stores sometime around December 2014