Review: Zeiss 35mm f1.4 Milvus (Canon EF)

The Milvus lineup of lenses from Zeiss are more or less their workhorses; and with the addition of the new Zeiss 35mm f1.4 Milvus lens, I’ve never been more convinced that they’re the absolute best lens maker on the market. Yes, Sigma–that mean even above what you’re capable of. While Zeiss’s mentality has always been about MTF charts and curves, in the past few years they’ve been working on a transition that’s catering not only to that crowd, but also to those who care more about the stuff that can’t be measured in a lab. For example, Zeiss lenses have always had a special character about them–I’ve seen folks on our Facebook page talk about it fairly often when their optics come up.

So what’s even more appealing about the Zeiss 35mm f1.4 Milvus lens is that they’re targeting at portrait photographers.

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Review: Canon EOS M6 (Canon EF-M Mount)

If you were to look at the mirrorless camera world, it would appear that Canon, with the Canon M6, is an entry into the world where they’re still trying to find themselves. To some, they could look like an experimental 20 something trying in vain to get their life together. Yet somehow or another, I genuinely never thought that I’d like the Canon M6. The camera isn’t designed to be the highest end mirrorless camera from Canon, yet somehow or another it’s a camera that surely deserves respect in some ways and groans of frustration at the fact that Canon has gotten this camera almost perfectly right yet it feels like they were purposely holding themselves back. The Canon M6 has at its heart a 24MP APS-C sensor which is smaller than all the other options out there from Fujifilm, Sony, Pentax, Sigma–and let’s be honest because they’re all more or less made by Sony. Designed for the enthusiast, the Canon M6 has some very tough competition from the entire camera world. Yet somehow or another, this truly is a camera that you need to personally experience to understand.

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First Impressions: Kodak Ektra Smartphone

Earlier this year, the Kodak Ektra smartphone was announced and photographers looked on with curiosity. The Kodak Ektra is manufactured by Kodak–you know, the same company that makes fantastic film. And so the inspiration for the Ektra was to be revolutionary in the same way that the Ektra camera was years ago. The Kodak Ektra was the first film camera with a manual film advance on it according to Kodak, and so they were trying to bring back a sense of that spirit with the new phone. On that idea, the phone isn’t designed for the uber-hipster techie that doesn’t believe themselves to be a hipster, but instead it’s designed for the creative hipster–you know, the stereotypical one that you’d say is one but is actually just on a different creative level than lots of people are. Take for example Thomas Leuthard, who has been using the phone to great success.

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Review: Fujifilm X100F

In many ways, the Fujifilm X100F is both the closest thing to a perfect camera and the most infuriating camera at the same time. By itself, the Fujifilm X100F boasts quite a bit of upgrades over its predecessor, the X100T, that truly make it competitive and viable. And as always, it isn’t at all a bad camera; but it could have been something much better. With the same 24MP X Trans Sensor at the heart of the company’s two flagship cameras, and that retro-gorgeous camera body that makes lots of photographers weak in the knees, the Fujifilm X100F will undoubtedly sell well–and it deserves to.

But after four iterations of the camera, there are things about it I still don’t understand.

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On Imagining the Idea of a Medium Format Sony a7s II

The idea of a medium format Sony a7s II isn’t really a completely farfetched one when you consider how photography and technology have evolved hand in hand. For years, medium format photography has been stated to be better than 35mm photography–at least in terms of the analog film world. In the digital world though, the two tend to be able to hold their ground with one another due to algorithms, processors, etc. The medium format world has also always been about getting higher megapixels, more emulsion, more details, more surface area, etc. In the film world, it results in grain that could look less unsightly and more pleasing than film typically allows.

So with that said, why can’t a medium format sensor have less megapixels and an incredibly clean high ISO output?

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Could Phase One Be Coming Out with a 100MP Medium Format Black and White Digital Back?

Hey La Noir Image subscribers, it’s time to really start to drool over the possibilities because there are hints of a Phase One black and white back in the air! We got a tip off from reader that perhaps a medium format 100MP Black and White digital back could be on its way from Phase One. The company has previously made apochromatic camera backs, which are essentially black and white camera sensors and that many photographers absolutely dream over.

While yes, photographers can easily go ahead and turn the images into black and white in post-production, it’s simply still not the same experience. Some photographers only shoot in black and white for example.

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The Nikon D7500 is the Nikon D500’s Little Brother

After announcing that the company is going to focus on their mid to higher end cameras, Nikon is announcing the Nikon D7500. This camera is almost everything that the company’s award winning Nikon D500 is. With that said, the company skipped ahead in numbers to the D7500 because they thought that the changes were really that significant and large. The key differences between the two cameras are burst, XQD, build, controls and AF system.

At the heart of the Nikon D7500 is the same 20.9MP imaging sensor that the Nikon D500 has. It can shoot 4k video and has an EXPEED 5 processing engine. On top of that, it eliminate the Optical Low Pass filter. Its ISO range is 100-51,200. More details from the press release are after the jump.

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