web analytics

macro

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 50mm f2.8 Touit product photos (6 of 7)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 2.8

We’re going to do you some justice: we’re not going to give you a list of lenses that will give you better macro images; that’s far too simple. The truth is that when combined with modern cameras, most any lens can do an incredible job. Instead, we’re going to tell you how to make your images even better without spending the equivalent of another lens.

The key to better macro images and better photos overall has to do with one thing: light. Yes, you can use natural light but it won’t always give you what you need to create an image that simply pops off the screen and grabs your viewers. Instead, you need to be in control of your light.

[click to continue…]

yUPy2by

Image by Miguel Jalo. Used with permission.

Photographer Miguel Jalo captured an absolutely incredible image of a mosquito who landed on him and began to feast on his blood. The image was posted to the PhotoCritique Subreddit, where many also found it to be a great catch.

Miguel states that he used a Nikon 40mm lens at F16 and ISO 100 and was afraid to get closer to the subject lest it get scared off. While folks are critiquing the background and cutting off the legs, Miguel still caught the important parts of the image that otherwise make it incredible and while framing it quite well.

“I shot this at f16. Was afraind to go any further because that particular lens starts losing sharpness. Those light(s) are the result of the in camera flash not being able to (light) up the whole frame. It was one of the problems with that lens in particular, because if you wanted 1:1 magnification (true macro) you’d have to get really really close to your subject.” states Miguel.

For what it’s worth, the image is very detailed and shows us a moment that we rarely ever see and are too often too busy swatting the mosquito.

H-HS043_k_front_slant (1)

Though they’re usually better known for lots of their very premium grade lenses, Panasonic today announced two new lenses: the LUMIX G 42.5mm F1.7 ASPH. POWER O.I.S. and the LUMIX G Macro 30mm F2.8 ASPH. MEGA O.I.S. lenses.

The 42.5mm f1.7 is obviously being targeted at portrait shooters, and is a more affordable version than their 42.5mm f1.2 lens. At its heart, it houses 10 elements in 8 groups, a close focusing distance of 12.2 inches, a metal mount, multi-coated lens elements, and POWER O.I.S.

But on the other side of the spectrum is the 30mm f2.8 MEGA OIS lens which is targeted at macro shooters. Panasonic states that it’s got a 1x life-size magnification, a focusing distance starting at 4.13 inches, has a metal mount, and 9 lenses in 9 groups including an aspherical element.

The Panasonic 30mm Macro f2.8 will be available in April and the Panasonic 42.5mm f1.7 in May at $399.99 each.

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon MR14 II ring flash review product photos (1 of 14)ISO 2001-50 sec at f - 4.0

Earlier this year, Canon introduced their MR-14 EX II ring flash. As the successor to their aging offering, the new flash brought minor upgrades with it including new ergonomics, a new LED lamp to help with focusing, and new controls on the back. But otherwise, it’s a mostly unchanged flash. To begin with, it was very specialized and the world of macro photography has changed quite dramatically as the years have progressed. Many photographers tend to go for diffusion off of large panels instead of direct light from a harsh flash.

And while you should be excited about the ETTL capability improvement that this flash brings, you should also scratch your head a bit about how it fits into Canon’s ecosystem.

[click to continue…]

Macro Flash Adapter

Image courtesy of the Flash Adapter website

We don’t think we’ve ever encountered something this special ops looking in the photo world, but this new Macro Flash Adapter may take the cake. It has an incredibly interesting design that takes light from your hot shoe mounted flash and distributes it to the four panels that you see. It is much different from the contemporary ring flash adapter which ideally is in the shape of a perfect ring. But this adapter fills in the sides, top, and the direct light. This takes the light from a single flash and spreads it out over a smaller area compared to a ring flash but puts the light in the spots where it really counts. There is no word on how much light loss there is but based on previous ring flashes adapters that we’ve worked with, we’re guessing around a single stop of light loss. If you’re shooting in TTL, then get ready to add +1 EV to your flash output. All of the panel are really big too when talking about objects at the macro scale–so the light will obviously be very soft.

The Flash Adapter is of Polish origin and created by photo enthusiasts Agnieszka and Ernest Lysak.

A video of how this crazy contraption works is after the jump.

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 60mm f2.4 review product photos (5 of 8)ISO 4001-40 sec at f - 4.0

The Fujifilm 60mm f2.4 lens was one of the first that Fujifilm released when the X series system was announced. As one of the oldest in the system, it is also in the hands of many users. Marketed as a macro lens, its 90mm field of view also does a great job for portraits when needed.

Sporting a wide open aperture for f2.4 and 10 elements in 8 groups, the lens is further made better with nine aperture blades.

Sadly though, it’s very easy to deem this lens the jack of all trades and master of none.

[click to continue…]