First Impressions: Fujifilm 80mm f2.8 R LM OIS WR Macro (Sample Images Included)

The Fujifilm 80mm f2.8 R LM OIS WR Macro is a lens that seems to be a really interesting one. It’s one of Fujifilm’s largest prime lenses and though it doesn’t sport as wide of an aperture as the 90mm f2, it has lots of features like close focusing abilities. Due to this feature alone, it may be an attractive option not only for shooting macro photos but also as a portrait focal length. When used with the latest camera options from Fujifilm, it’s a lens that offers pretty fast focusing abilities in addition to a fully weather sealed package.

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First Impressions: Fujifilm GF 45mm f2.8 R WR (Sample Images Included)

I applaud Fujifilm for delivering the Fujifilm GF 45mm f2.8 R WR to us in such a short time. Being the equivalent of the 35mm field of view, I also applaud them delivering a wide angle medium format lens with a relatively fast aperture. Like the other Fujifilm GF lenses, this one is weather sealed and is putting an emphasis on delivering only the absolute best image quality from Fujifilm. What’s really interesting here though is that a lens like this delivers the equivalent field of view of an approximately 35mm lens, but is inherently a longer focal length. What that translates into is less distortion for something like portraiture–which I’m positive the Fujifilm GF 45mm f2.8 R WR will be used for.

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Review: Nikon 28mm f1.4 E ED (Nikon F Mount)

When the Nikon 28mm f1.4 came in for review and was announced, I was a bit hesitant. Why? Well, while I was excited about the lens for sure, I’m still not a person that believes that DSLRs are necessarily the future despite the fact that I acknowledge how good they are. And to that end, I believe that if Nikon has a full frame mirrorless camera system and made this lens for it, it would be an even bigger winner than it really is. But the current Nikon 28mm f1.4 is a dream lens in so many ways. If you’re a street photographer, portrait photographer, or a photojournalist then you may really enjoy what this lens offers.

In fact, this is hands down my favorite Nikon prime lens with the exception of the company’s 105mm f1.4.

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An Update to the Ricoh GR II: Will There Ever Be a New Ricoh GR III?

The updated Ricoh GR III could potentially be nothing more than just a myth, but it still stands as a fact that the Ricoh GR II is a popular choice for many street photographers. This isn’t to be confused with the older iteration of this camera, which Eric Kim reviewed for us years ago, but instead an updated version of the Ricoh GR II. The camera is a cult hit with this genre for a number of reasons including the small size, fantastic image quality and the pretty silent operation coupled with great ergonomics.

It’s been a number of years since the Ricoh GR II was announced and so it’s a bit odd the camera hasn’t been updated in a long time. Fixed lens cameras and point and shoots typically have shorter life spans, but the 16MP sensor inside the Ricoh GR II is still capable of putting out very sharp images. We’ve even featured photographers who shoot with it here on the blog.

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First Impressions: Lomography Lomo’Instant Square

In the past few years, I’ve learned to trust in Lomography’s ability to churn out solid instant film cameras, and the Lomography Lomo’Instant Square seems to be every bit as solid as lots of camera I’ve seen thus far. It’s the first camera to use the Fujifilm Instax Square format that isn’t made by Fujifilm. With a very classic design that is sort of an ode to old Kodak instant film cameras, this is one of Lomography’s more curious cameras. Lomo decided to go with a glass lens, a bellows system, and more or less the same sort of system the previous Lomo’Instant cameras have had. It borrows a lot from them and personally speaking, I’m pretty glad that I backed it. For ethical reasons of running a photography blog, I typically don’t like to back Kickstarter campaigns, but this is one that I firmly believed in.

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David Forrest: Documenting How 9/11 Affected The Brooklyn Waterfront

All images by ​​David Forrest. Used with permission.

If you were to think about all the things that happened during 9/11, you’d surely consider that there were probably photographers who wanted to get closer to the tragedy to document it but simply couldn’t–and that was the situation for David Forrest. When the planes crashed into the towers, police prevented people from getting into Manhattan from the other boroughs. But the towers are so large that they’re easily visible from every borough no matter where you are pretty much. So when the smoke and embers came over the city, it travelled quite far and was very visible. And while a lot was happening in Manhattan, the ash traveled to the other boroughs.

David’s story is one that is unlike many others–because while many stories concentrate on what happened in Manhattan, not many people talk about how Brooklyn was affected.

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5 Simple Lens Effects You Can Make For Under $10

Featured image is a screen capture from the video. All credit to Aputure.

We have all seen those really sweet shots on the web or social media where everyone is asking the photographer how they created an effect or produced a shot, and the answer is some silly item they had on hand at the shoot that they shot through to create the effect. It is counter intuitive to most of us, being used to the insane prices on everything associated with photography, but it is true, you don’t need to spend a lot of money to create sweet practical effects at your shoots. Continue reading…

Review: Canon 24-105mm f4 L IS USM II (Canon EF Mount)

Canon has always been a company that is a bit slower to change things, and so when the Canon 24-105mm f4 L IS USM II was announced, I was pleased to see that they did a number to fix many issues with the previous lens. With that said though, years have passed now and the Canon 24-105mm f4 L IS USM II more or less looks like every other option on the market. Some of the new welcome additions are the prevention of lens creep incorporated into the design, a lock to keep the lens locked in at 24mm, better weather sealing, faster autofocus, and less issues with image quality. For years, the previous version of the lens was my bread and butter option. While many photographers reach for the 24-70mm f2.8 lenses, I tend to go for the longer focal range option.

For only $1,099 you’re getting one of the best bang for your buck L lenses that Canon offers. At a more expensive price point than Sigma’s 24-105mm f4 DG OS HSM, you’re paying for weather sealing and the ability to lock the lens at 24mm to prevent it from extending when in your camera bag. that and less contrast in the images. But the Canon 24-105mm f4 L IS USM II’s main strength is in the versatility it offers the photographer.

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