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X10T_zpsfe4715a6

It looks like the Fujifilm X100s is about to get an update of some sort very soon. Mirrorless Rumors got a hold of evidence allegedly leaked by photographer David Hobby. the EXIF data of some of the images (which were now taken down)  state that they’re from a new camera called the X100T. This sort of makes sense, as it’s the next letter in the alphabet. However, the S in the nomenclature stood for speed–and we’re not sure what T could stand for.

Fuji Rumors is stating that the camera will boast a 24MP APS-C sensor with faster AF, a new fixed lens, a tilting screen, a new EVF, and a wider phase detection area. These are all upgrades that the X100s needed since the lens attached to the camera was more or less the same as the X100–and the larger megapixels need to work with a newer lens for more resolution.

It’s about time for an X100s update anyway since there have been no major firmware updates to the camera in a while. We’re just going to have to wait and see what comes this way.

Adapters gservo-3628-20140629-3

I have used lens adapters on mirrorless cameras–just like loads and loads of other users do. When I made the decision to buy the Sony A7, my previous experience with adapters influenced my purchase. Instead of buying Sony lenses, I would keep on using my Nikon lenses. It had been suggested one would have to be insane to use Nikon lenses with a Sony camera, which doesn’t make sense to me. With this decision I knew there would be some sacrifice. Yes, it would have been easy just to buy another Nikon camera, but I wanted something that was full-frame and mirrorless. Nikon is not creating the cameras that I want, but I love my Nikon glass.

And with that, begins my story of what I lose with adapters.

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Nikon18-300DX gservo-00576-20140614

Not every photographer wants a prime lens. Not every photographer wants to change lenses. Some situations demand one lens that can do almost anything. This is where the AF-S Nikkor DX 18-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR comes into play. Believe it or not a lens like this does have a use despite our groans about variable aperture–and it’s about convenience.

Let’s see what this lens has to offer [click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Samsung 16-50mm lens review (1 of 6)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 4.0

When Samsung first announced their 16-50mm f2-2.8 lens, we were incredibly excited that they offered something quite different from their previous products. The last very serious lens that they released was their 85mm f1.4, but now the company boasts a whole new level of professional quality–or at least that was the intent.

Samsung’s 16-50mm f2-2.8 incorporates weather sealing into the design, which works perfectly with the company’s NX30 camera. It also is quite a beefy optic to hold while shooting. But beyond this, the lens was designed with 9 aperture blades and 18 elements in 12 groups. And at its pretty hefty cost, we can gladly say that this is one of the best lenses that we’ve tested for street photography.

But as we all know, a lens system works with the cameras that are available to it.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon 35mm f1.8 lead image (1 of 1)ISO 1001-40 sec at f - 4.0

Nikon released their 35mm f1.8 G ED lens earlier this year, and when it was announced it whetted the appetites of full frame lovers everywhere. Though not a direct replacement for the company’s previous lens offering, it was designed with the full frame customer in mind. We believe the 35mm focal length truly shows what the human eye sees and it is a lens that can be used for anything like street photography, wide portraits, events, weddings, candids, food, etc.

With the ability of focus as closely at 9.84 inches and housing seven aperture blades, 11 elements in 8 groups, and weighing 10.76 oz, it is a lens that will probably be on the camera of many a photographer looking to step up their game and become more serious with their craft.

And while we’re confident that this lens will satisfy most customers, we also know that later on you’ll want so much more.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer 35mm nikon vs sigma lead image (1 of 1)ISO 16001-50 sec at f - 4.5

Though DxOMark stated a while back that Nikon’s new 35mm f1.8 G is sharper than its f1.4 brother; we believe that the true test is with the Sigma’s 35mm f1.4 DG–which is the king of the crop in our eyes. And so while reviewing the new Nikon lens, we asked Sigma to loan us one of their lenses in Nikon mount for a head to head comparison.

So who came out on top?

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