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The winners of our Leica, Fujifilm and Calumet contests have been decided. The two photo contests were two of the toughest that we’ve ever hosted with loads and loads of great street photography and landscape entries. But in the end, only a couple of folks are getting brand new cameras.

Did you win? Hit the jump to see for yourself.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Peak Design Slide Camera Strap review product photos (1 of 6)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

Though we typically tend to review more fashionable straps, we in no way discriminate against those that try to appeal more towards the functional side of things–like the new Peak Design Slide camera strap. The strap feels essentially like a seat belt that can buckle you up to your camera as you cruise together down the road of life.

That was a pretty cheesy line, right?

Seriously though, the Peak Design Slide strap is a bit deceiving. At first, it looks like a typical sling strap like those from BlackRapid. But in actuality, it’s much cooler than that. In fact, it’s the single most versatile camera strap that we’ve ever seen and tested.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony 16-35mm f4 product photos (5 of 7)ISO 1601-50 sec at f - 4.0

Wide angle zooms are amongst some of the most sought after lenses by the photographers that love to shoot wide. Combine that with a constant aperture and you’ve got a photographer that will be happy for days. So when Sony announced their 16-35mm f4 OSS lens for the E mount system, we knew that it was going to be a hit. Due to the company’s collaboration with Zeiss for many years, the two have worked together to produce better and better lenses.

But while this lens will be highly sought after by many photographers, it probably shouldn’t be in everyone’s camera bags.

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flickr2

Flickr has apologized for selling creative commons images as wall art, turning a profit from images specifically labeled not for commercial use. As a penance Flickr has pulled down all the CC pictures from its wall art selection any sales it’s made with the photos will be refunded.

Bernardo Hernandez, head of Flickr at Yahoo, posted a blog post entitled “An Update on Flickr Wall Art,” humbly noting “we’re sorry we let some of you down.”

“[…] [M]any felt that including Creative Commons-licensed work in this service wasn’t within the spirit of the Commons and our sharing community,” Bernardo wrote. “We hear and understand your concerns, and we always want to ensure that we’re acting within the spirit with which the community has contributed.”

Flickr’s Creative Commons section has long been a special part site, which allows photographers to freely post and share their images for anyone to use with the only caveat that these photos cannot be sold for money. Oddly enough Flickr broke its own rule in November by adding a large portion of the CC collection Wall Art printing service. Soon after the Flickr community began complaining that the image-hosting site was selling photographers’ work without giving part of the profit to the original artists.

Still Flickr was technically within its own rights picking only images with a “non-commercial” restriction. In the same statement Bernardo outlined the Wall Art service will continue, but it will not tap into creative commons-licensed images unless photographers reach out to the Flickr curation team themselves. Jump past the break to

Via DIY Photography

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Lomography LCA 120 product photos (1 of 7)ISO 2001-200 sec at f - 4.0

Earlier this year, Lomography announced the smallest 120 film camera with automatic metering ever made: the LCA 120. Traditionally, no photographer that uses 120 film on a regular basis has ever consistently wanted to shoot with a fully automatic mode. This is why many of these cameras have interchangeable backs, lenses, and various settings. There were also various medium format rangefinders, but those are another story.

The LCA 120 is a medium format (6×6) automatic metering camera with the only variable being ISO control. Focusing involves flipping a switch for zone control. Otherwise, this camera is also the most straightforward and simple medium format camera that I’ve ever touched.

This makes the LCA 120 arguably one of the best cameras that the Phoblographer has tested for street photography.

So what’s the problem?

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Kevin Lee The Phoblographer Breakthrough Photography X-Series Filters Product Images-09

With the many advances in technology that have happened over the years, lenses have become better and better at reducing flare from sun and light overall. This has to do with how glass has become better and how the chemistry involved in the coatings has improved.

Many, many years ago back in the film days, photographers needed to use UV filters with their lenses. One of the biggest reasons for this had to do with glare from the sun and extraneous light that caused flaring that didn’t look so great. Indeed though, lens flare can sometimes look great but it is very situational.

Then the digital photography revolution happened, and the UV filters started to degrade the image quality that you’d see. The reason for this had to do with the glass involved.

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