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DxOMark is announcing their Sigma 50mm f1.4 Art lens findings today. According to what they did in the lab, the company concludes that the lens is outperformed by the 55mm f1.4 Zeiss Otus lens only in terms of light transmission, distortion control, and vignetting control. Otherwise, they’re basically exactly spot on when it comes to sharpness numbers. The even more fascinating news is that they both wipe the floor with Canon’s f1.2 L offering–and hopefully will dispel the myth that someone should only go for all L glass when building their Canon kit.

The company didn’t test the lens on the Nikon D800E and we figure that this is mostly because the units going around right now are Canon mount.

More findings are after the jump.

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Korean astro-photographer Kwon, O Chul has been photographing the night sky for years. His star-spangled work has grazed several books and been featured on different exhibits in South Korea and Malaysia. He’s also created and published a number beautiful timelapse videos over the years, traveling to the best locations South Korea has to offer.

As a culmination of his five years worth of work with the cosmos, Kwon has released a four-minute timelapse video of epic proportions, shot with Canon EOS 5D Mark II and Mark III. Cosmos Odyssey: The Journeys of an AstroPhotographer is a stunning, star-filled short that takes us through the glorious landscapes of South Korea, Tanzania, Australia, and Canada, all bedecked with shimmering night skies as far as the eye can see.

Light displays, star trails, and the Milky Way make cameo appearances in this awesome video and it’s a gorgeous synopsis of a talented photographer’s work. Watch it in its entirety after the jump.

For more of Kwon’s timelapses, check out his Vimeo page.

Via Canon Watch

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 Kodak Hawkeye II DSLR NASA

Did you know that one of the first digital SLRs was actually used by NASA back in 1991? Neither did we. It was in fact the very first camera that qualifies to be called a DSLR. However, back then, that meant something entirely different from what it means now. In 1991, Kodak retrofitted a Nikon F3 SLR body (yes, one of those old-school cameras that ran on this ‘film’ stuff) with a digital back that contained a tiny CCD sensor. In order to get the image information out of the camera, you needed a separate processing and storage unit that you’d carry over your shoulder.

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julius motal the phoblographer sony a7 product image

When Sony’s full-frame E-mount system was first launched last year, it comprised four dedicated lenses for the A7 and A7R cameras. These were the two primes, the FE 35mm f2.8 and FE 55mm f1.8, and the two zooms, the FE 24-70mm f4 and the FE 28-70mm f3.5-5.6. An FE 70-200mm was also announced along the cameras, and will be available soon. While five lenses is quite a solid setup for a brand-new photographic system, these particular ones offer too little choice for demanding photographers.

The good news is, though, that Sony has been promising more lenses for the system, including a wide-angle zoom, another fast prime lens and a macro lens. Zeiss also announced that they are working on new lenses for the full-frame E-mount system, and theirs will be manual primes just like they made for various DSLR systems in the past. Another fast, manual prime lens has recently been announced by Chinese manufacturer Mitakon and should also soon be available.

Sony Alpha Rumors now heard from an anonymous source that over the course of this year, a total of fourteen lenses for Sony’s full-frame E-mount system will become available. This means that in addition to the five lens previously announced by Sony, there will be nine more coming this year including the ones from Sony and Zeiss that we mentioned above. Together with the Mitakon lens, these will make for a total of 15 lenses.

That’s actually not too bad for a system that by the end of the year will be just over a year old. Also, among these 15 lenses, there should be enough choice for most photographers that are contemplating switching to the A7, A7S or A7R. And let’s not forget, because these cameras are mirrorless E-mount cameras, you can adapt almost any full-frame lens to these cameras, and even use autofocus with some when you have the right adapter. So overall, the lens choice for these cameras is already pretty huge.

Canon 24-70mm f4L IS

Canon better come out with a new image stabilization version of its 24-70mm f2.8 lens already. Canon Watch has spotted the fourth patent in a row that illustrates the Japanese Camera company is planning to develop a new IS version of the ever popular 24-70mm f2.8 lens.

As of late Canon has been putting out patents on IS versions of all its lenses from the other extremely popular 17-40mm f4 lens, long telephoto lenses, and even its standard nifty fifty. The 24-70mm f2.8 however seems like the most likely lens candidate to get the IS treatment as it’s one of Canon’s most sought after lenses.

What’s more, third party lens makers are starting to catch up. Last year Tamron introduced its 24-70mm f2.8 SP VC complete with vibration compensation. We’re also still hanging onto earlier rumors of a Sigma 24-70mm f2 lens, which will probably come with image stabilization. Sigma’s already crammed optical stabilization into the 24-140mm f4 DG OS HSM—which isn’t available on official Canon glass—so it is extremely its new 24-70mm lens will also feature IS.

Via Canon Watch

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer EyeFi Mobi Cloud intro (1 of 1)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 4.0

When EyeFi first launched the Mobi card, it seemed as if they greatly improved the service. The Mobi card was centered around transferring JPEG images to your phone quickly and easily through a two step process. If you wanted to send RAW images, you’d need to go with something else like the Eye-Fi Pro card.

Today though, the company is announcing not only a rebranding but a new service in EyeFi Cloud. The cloud is a premium service that they are pitching to those that use multiple devices. EyeFi Cloud enables someone to shoot and image, send it to their phone (or other device) which then in turn beams the images into the cloud. When the images hit the cloud, they’re accessible from your other devices such as your computer, tablet, or phone.

But we’re not sure that it’s for everyone.

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