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Taking a photo with a tablet

A colleague of mine recently asked a question about wedding photography after talking about his experience of shooting his first one. He ended it very stressed out and eventually complained about so many folks holding up iPads and phones to take a photo during the ceremony and in some instances getting in the way of his photo-taking opportunity. While yes, it’s unfortunate that it ruined his shot I believe that event shooting and wedding shooting has changed to the point where we as photographers should instead be embracing this instead of trying to fight it.

Let’s be honest here, no one in the crowd taking a photo with their phone, tablet or even a little DSLR is your competition. Absolutely no one is going to shoot a photo and then charge the bride and groom for it. Yes, they’re getting in the way. Yes, it’s annoying. But instead of fretting over how a single image of yours is now ruined, turn it into something else immediately. If you’re at the back of the hall and you suddenly see cameras, phones and tablets go up you shouldn’t try to fight it. Embrace it and shoot that instance because at the end of the day your job is to be a documentarian.

If you’re at a wedding, and trying to snap a photo of the cake or a specific moment and someone’s flash is getting in the way and messing up your exposures, then that’s one thing. You can easily and politely ask them to stop for around 30 seconds so that you can take photos that the happy couple will remember and cherish later on in life. But if someone is simply just taking a photo, then that shouldn’t really bother you or prevent you from doing your job.

Of course, you can always ensure that this doesn’t happen to begin with by getting more creative with your angles and positioning as well as having a second shooter if that option is available to you in your budget. Furthermore, I don’t think that we can really stop people from taking pictures at this stage of the game. Everyone has a phone on them or a tablet and everyone loves taking photos all the time even though it’s not anywhere in the same realm or reason as to why you’re doing it. At certain times, telling folks to stop taking photos isn’t a bad idea–but again only at certain times.

Otherwise, it’s time that we embrace it rather than fight it.

Model: Asta Paredes

Model: Asta Paredes

We’ve done a couple of tutorials on how to edit skin tones and make them look better in Adobe Lightroom, but today we’re sharing a video specifically walking you through how we edited a single image. You’ll see just how simple it really is to get perfect skin tones just by working manually with the color channels. The video is after the jump.

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TimeofWar09

All images by Olivier Valsecchi. Used with permission.

Olivier Valsecchi was born in Paris in 1979 and after taking the plunge into photography has been published and exhibited around Europe, the US, and Asia. After winning a Hasselblad Masters award for his portrait series Dust, he created Klecksography in 2012. His new Drifting series is a journey through art history where each picture merges the tradition of the reclining nude with the still life painting genre from Flanders.

His series called “Time of War” is an ode to the struggles that we go through every day and how we battle against it. At first we thought the images featured powder, but we later learned that it’s all ashes. It builds on the dust series and involves religious symbolism as well as creative expressionism about our times.

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ice

All images by Valerie Susloparova. Used with permission.

Playing with forced perspective in photography can be fun–and it’s often even better when you have full control over the creative freedom the same way that 23 year old Russian illustrator Valerie Susloparova has. She’s an illustrator that uses photography to present her work in a fun and lighthearted way. Valerie tells us that she’s inspired by photos of animals–specifically her favorite Instagram pets. “I draw an illustration and then want to present it (in an) interesting and funny (way). Ideas appear in my head with the speed of light.”

After she illustrates the image, she finds a way to interact with it in a fun manner and then takes that photo for her Instagram.

Valerie says that her Labrador was her first model and that she tried to do the same thing with food and portraits, but now she’s just focusing on animals.

Her ultimate goal with the photos? When we asked about a photo book, she said that maybe she’ll do a calendar or prints on shirts.

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Cinestill photo

If you had asked me years ago if I would be reviewing film in the year 2015, I probably would have laughed in your face. There is no way that a couple of years ago that any editor would have thought that a company would be making new film products. But indeed, there have been. CineStill, founded by the Brothers Wright photography team, have repacked Kodak cinema film by taking off a layer that makes it safe for typical C-41 processing. For CineStill 800T, the company gave us ISO 800 film that is Tungsten balanced–which means that it’s best used with a flash or daylight.

In my personal experience, ISO 800 film has been very grainy except when it’s Kodak Portra and pushed a stop. But in this case, CineStill has given us the finest grain 800 film I’ve ever seen.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony 28mm f2 lens review product photos (2 of 7)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 2.8

Besides the 55mm f1.8 and 35mm f2.8, the only other compact autofocus prime lens that we have for the full frame E-mount is the Sony 28mm f2. It was recently introduced as part of the growing line of full frame E mount lenses. Targeted at street photographers, architecture shooters, candid shooters, and many more this lens is one of the few primes that also isn’t Zeiss branded.

With nine aperture blades, nine elements in eight groups, no image stabilization, and weighing in at 7.05 oz this lens has the potential to become a very standard lens for many.

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