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Kevin-Lee The Phoblographer Nikon 20mm f1.8G ED Product Images (5 of 12)

Right now, there are loads of Canon 70D bundles available with a printer. Plus, there are refurbished Nikon camera deals.

Still going on: if you purchase a Fujifilm X Pro 1, 35mm f1.4 and 18mm f2, you can get the entire package for $948 with free shipping. Indeed, we still use the Fujifilm X Pro 1 for our testing and the camera’s quality is still very top notch.

Not interested? There is still a dead where we found number of lenses from pretty much every manufacturer and mount for under $200. Go take a look.

We’ve also found discounts of at least 10% on over 4,000 camera lenses over at Amazon, some at over 25% off, 50% off, and 70% off.

Still in effect, here are some that are 25% off, but there are also lots of wide angle lens options available.Plus, there are discounts on 50mm f1.8 (nifty 50) lenses.

More discounts are after the jump.

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All images by Ken Herrmann. Used with permission.

“When I first visited Calcutta and flower market, I was fascinated by the flower sellers and the way they wear the flowers on – as big robes.” says photographer Ken Herrmann.  “Also the way they treat the flowers, cuddling them and caress them, I think was interesting.”

That’s part of the idea of Ken’s Flower Man project. Ken is the man behind Hollywood Characters, and has an eye for creating telling and revealing portraits.

In an email, Ken tells us that he was inspired to convey the contrast between the masculine yet “dirty” flower sellers and the colorful sacred flowers they sell. To do this, he worked with a simple and neutral background. Ken’s aim was to highlight the aesthetics among chaos and poverty in Calcutta. “I love that you can still find an authentic, old-school version of an Indian city here. In a way, time has been made, the old Victorian buildings have been preserved and you can still experience the human-pulled rickshaws. The city lives in many ways up to its characteristics – city of joy.”

The Flower Man portraits are after the jump.

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Nikon D300

For many years now, photographers have thought that the Nikon D7200 and 7000 line in general hasn’t been a true successor to the Nikon D300s. While Nikon has stated that there will be no D400, an interesting forum thread was started on Fox2. The New Camera reports that it will sport a 24.3MP APS-C sensor at the heart.Additionally, it’s possible that it will have a 51 points AF system, ISO range up to 51200, and will also supports recording 4K UHD.

In some ways, it makes a lot of sense as Nikon has been pushing the megapixel count on their APS-C sensors–and so has the industry in general.

If a new flagship APS-C camera arises, it’s also bound to include tougher weather sealing and will perhaps be hyper targeted the way that the Canon 7D MK II was. That camera was really, really targeted at bird photographers–and those are the pros that really love their APS-C DSLRs and lens collection.

If the Nikon D400 comes in September the way that the reports are saying, then it will be right before Photo Plus 2015.

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The story of Galaxy is similar to that of the Impossible Project except that Galaxy is trying to revive an old Kodak process. According to the company’s Kickstarter page, Kodak discontinued a line of direct positive paper back in the 1970s. For the uninitiated, direct positive paper is photosensitive paper where the image develops right onto the paper. Think of it like a wet plate or a Polaroid except that the paper doesn’t have the chemicals built in for development like Instant film does.

Galaxy found a book all about it and set about trying to find a way to re-create the paper in some ways. However, Galaxy believes that they can actually do a much better job and make the paper available in higher ISOs comparable to 120 film. They also claim that they can make the paper available with a higher dynamic range, and with an easier development process.

The paper, if funded fully on Kickstarter, will have a fixed grade contrast as well as a glossy embossed surface. Photographers will be able to shoot with it in 4×5″, 5×7″, 8×10″, 11×14″, 16×20″ with custom sizes available in 4×10″, 7×17″, 8×20″, 12×20″, 14×17″, 20×24″ and some rolls of different sizes. The idea of simply being able to shoot at 20×24″ with direct positive paper is thrilling!

So what will this mean for photographers? For those of us that still love to shoot with film (and there are a heck of a lot of you that read this site) we’ll have more options available in large format as both Kodak’s and Fujifilm’s numbers seem to be dwindling. Smaller and less traditional companies seem to be trying to keep it alive and do very well according to a recent investigation we did.

Large format positive paper offers a quality that you simply can’t duplicate with digital cameras. The grain is organic, the dynamic range may not necessarily be the same but the image is truly analog and tactile. If you shoot a 20×24 image, you can easily frame it and put it on your wall instead of needing to do the print out. That image is very much an original.

Head on over to the page’s Kickstarter for more info.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon 5Ds review images (5 of 24)ISO 4001-200 sec at f - 4.0

That beautiful natural light effect that everyone loves in their food photography can be created at any time of day or night–and you don’t need to wait for the best times of the day for it to happen. By using a flash (mostly out of the hot shoe but sometimes in it) you can create those really beautiful food photos that make you want to indulge in all the things.

And to be honest, it’s really, really not hard to do. If anything, food photography with a flash is a one trick pony and what will make the images better are adding textures and interesting compositions/patterns. That part is all up to your own creative freedom.

Here’s how you can use flash for better food photography.

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Mary and Tommy's Engagement (27 of 46)ISO 100

Shooting engagement sessions is one way to start to dip your toe into eventually photographing weddings. The session typically tells some sort of story in a way that combines aspects of photojournalism and portraiture, and it’s designed to make the happy couple not only become more excited about marriage but also to be put on the wedding invitations. After you’ve spoken with and planned the session with your couple, you’ll need to get the right gear.

Here are a couple of lenses that we recommend from our reviews index.

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