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Wet like a dog

All images by Joey Tichenor. Used with permission.

“In 2011, I was getting tired of the work I was shooting in Minneapolis both professionally & personally. I wanted & needed to create a fresh body of work to help stand out a bit in my midwest market.” says photographer Joey Tichenor about his photos of surfers. Like every photographer, Joey goes through dry spells of creativity and needs to evolve to become better. For some of us, that means shooting a totally new type of work.

“A lot of the guys that I admired shot environmental portraiture & documentary work which is where I wanted to focus my energy towards rather than the work I’d been doing. I decided that the best place to do this would be out west in California. I also wanted to see if I could build a network of photographers, agency & art buyer contacts out west in hopes of moving there one day.”

Joey tells us the story in his own words after the jump.

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For years, the Canon version was regarded as the best amongst the cheap lenses out there. Sometimes it was under $100 though most recently it’s around the $120 mark. The Yongnuo version is far under that at around $40.

In their test, Kai finds that the Yongnuo 50mm f1.8 is pretty darned good–though the focusing motor is probably one of the most annoying parts. They found the Canon 50mm f1.8 II to be faster to focus by a hair and they also found the Yongnuo to be worse than Canon’s. Oddly enough, others (like Tony Northrup) found them to be comparable.

The rest of the video as well as the results of their test are after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss 50mm f2.8 touit extra photos (8 of 14)ISO 2001-1000 sec at f - 2.8

Here in the NorthEast of the USA, spring is in the air. With spring comes lots of new opportunities to go out there and take photos of everything around you, but in particular, spring is an excellent time for you to go out there and shoot photos with film. Why shoot film? Because film photography forces you to sit there and get everything perfectly right in the camera before you press the shutter. You’ll make decisions that you never thought of before like how highlights are affecting the scene, how dark the shadows are, and what the colors will look like. It will also force you to do things like spot metering and figuring out the right exposure that you want–not what the camera is telling you.

Here are some great reasons to get out there and shoot film this Spring.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer SLR Magic Bokehmorphic review photos (7 of 15)

While Bokeh is often used as a crutch to create a beautiful image. When used correctly, however, it can do a terrific job to help tell a story visually. We’re not going to encourage to never stop down. In fact, you need to when telling certain stories with images. However, we are going to let you know about a couple of key secrets on how to get the best from your lens and get the best bokeh.

In fact, we do this as part of our lens testing here at the Phoblographer.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Nikon D810 review lead product image (1 of 1)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.0

In today’s Edition of Cheap Photo, we’ve rounded up your last chance for discounts on Canon and Nikon lenses and cameras. Plus you can get $300 off on the 5D Mk II and 6D. The listings are after the jump.

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DIY projects can be really fun, and filmmaker Dustin McLean has a cool tutorial on YouTube on how to make your own softbox. His is mostly targeted at filmmakers, but if you’re a photographer who uses constant lighting then you can use if for your own needs.

Dustin fully states that the $7 spent was just for the diffusion panel, but the softbox was otherwise made from cardboard that was painted black, given black tape on the edges for securement and to ensure that light didn’t escape, and added diffusion/reflective material on the inside. Most of this was all right at home and available to him–and chances are that it is available to you too.

The only tough part that we see is the opening for a flash or a light which we feel needs to be tight to ensure that light doesn’t escape.

The video on making a DIY softbox is after the jump.

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