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Daughter Performing Magic

Creating the Photograph is an original series where we interview photographers about a photo that they shot and how it was achieved. The results are some knowledge passed on to you. Want to be featured? Email chrisgampat[at]thephoblographer[dot]com.

Photographer Corey Boland is a physical therapist that wears the photographer cape and cowl at night, but like the great Williams Carlos Williams before him, he surely has a creative and artistic side. We found the image that is the center of this post when he posted it on Reddit–naturally though, we know exactly how it was lit. But even though the methodology is fairly common, many don’t know how a photo like this is achieved. Nor do they always have the creative vision to pull something like this off in a very smart way.

Here’s Corey’s story.

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julius motal the phoblographer tips night 06

It would be wonderful if we had the best possible light for each shot at any time of day. For better or worse, the golden hour is just that–a period of beautiful light that happens once before dusk and once after dawn, providing there are ideal conditions. There will be occasions when you’re photographing at night, when you’ll only have street lights, neon signs, headlights and similarly limited light sources. It can be somewhat daunting, but here are some tips for photographing at night. [click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer MyMiggo camera strap large review images (7 of 9)ISO 4001-1000 sec at f - 2.8

If you want a single photo of a still subject, there is no real good reason why you need to sit there shooting loads of images over and over again. This just results in you going through image after image after image until you find the one that isn’t blurry. Well instead of feeding into and working around the problem, the proper procedure involves eliminating the problem to begin with.

If your camera doesn’t have in sensor stabilization or your lens doesn’t have stabilization built in, then you should consider the techniques used by photographers years and years before the technology existed. No, we’re not talking about tripods–let’s be honest, they aren’t always practical.

Instead, here is how you eliminate camera shake to begin with.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Samsung 85mm f1.4 review images (1 of 2)ISO 1001-800 sec at f - 2.0

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Check them out right here.

Before you even get into reading this piece, know that we’re talking about an actual lens focal length, not equivalent to field of view. Look at it this way: you like taking photos with a 50mm lens, right? Let’s say you’re working with Micro Four Thirds camera options. In order to get a 50mm field of view, you need to slap a 25mm lens on your camera. But guess what? That 25mm lens will still act like a 25mm lens. It will be just as distorted and even though you’re still using the center area of the lens more or less you’ll still get all the problems that a lens like that faces. To get rid of that distortion, you’ll need a longer focal length. I found this out the hard way when working with a subject of larger stature. Though I felt the images looked great, she didn’t–and the only thing that really could have helped would have been a longer lens.

To eliminate that distortion to begin with, you’ll need to work with longer focal lengths. The generally accepted portrait focal length is an 85mm or longer. Now again, I’m not talking about an 85mm equivalent field of view on Micro Four Thirds. I’m saying that I need at least an 85mm focal length. Yes, the M43 coalition does a great job with making sure that their lenses are superb, but if you’re going to do portraits then you should eliminate any sort of distortion problems from the start.

Moving up to larger formats like APS-C or Full Frame, we think that the 85mm to the 135mm range is a great area to start working. Remember, the main thing that you’ll need to do is keep the distortion down to begin with.

Tamron-SP-15-30mm-f2.8-Di-VC-USD-full-frame-zoom-lens

Tamron has been relatively quiet this year in terms of new lenses, but just in time for Photokina 2014, the company has a brand new wide angle zoom offering. Tamton has announced the development of a new 15-30mm f2.8mm lens with vibration control built in. This pretty much trumps Nikon’s 14-24mm f2.8 in terms of usefulness and more or less also trumps Canon’s 16-35mm f2.8 offering as well for landscape and architectural uses.

This lens features 18 elements in 13 groups, aspherical elements, low dispersion elements, an ultrasonic silent drive motor, vibration compensation with three ceramic ball bearings, and a new eBAND coating. According to them, the new coating is “A nano-structured layer (1nm = 1/1,000,000mm), with dimensions smaller than the wavelengths of visible rays of light, is deployed on top of multiple coating layers to maximize efficiency.”

“Reflections occur at the interface between the lens and the air because of the difference in refractive indices of the two substances. The nano-structure of the eBAND Coating renders an extremely low refractive index by minimizing the differential with that of air while actively inducing air to its own structure, thus significantly suppressing the extent and degree of reflections.”

More tech specs are after the jump. We also have no word yet on pricing.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Zeiss Rokinon Sigma 85mm f1.4 three way comparison (1 of 3)ISO 4001-125 sec at f - 3.5

With Zeiss’s new 85mm f1.4 Otus reviewed, we took it upon ourselves to do an informal comparison of two of its biggest and closest competitors: the Rokinon 85mm f1.4 and the Sigma 85mm f1.4. Now granted, neither of these lenses are said to be targeted at the higher end photographer. But with Sigma’s offering being a couple of years old and Rokinon’s not being so old either, we decided that it would be great to see just how the three perform against one another.

Editor’s Note: Again we are saying that this is an informal comparison to see how the three stack up against one another. We’d like to remind our readers though that each offering is pretty darn solid, but if anything this is more of a measure of how the technology has progressed.

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