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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm x pro 1 street photography test revisited (1 of 5)ISO 800

Is it possible at all to take photos of children in public without being creepy? As it is, taking photos of people in public can sometimes be a touchy subject. Absolutely no photographer that reads this site (I hope) wants to be known as the creep. And in all of our teachings, we have always only preached respect of your subjects. As it is, taking someone’s photograph isn’t disrespect. It’s simply an act. What could be disrespectful instead are the intentions of taking the pictures to begin with–but this connotation is usually associated with men more than women (though creeps come in all shapes, sizes and genders). If your intentions are simply to document the human condition, then depending on the situation, you should always approach with a sense of caution. But if you approach it in a way that doesn’t creep anyone out (no matter what gender you are) then you shouldn’t at all feel ashamed.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Olympus EM5 Link Cosplay shoot (7 of 23)ISO 200

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A couple of years ago, I faced a pretty big logistical problem on a shoot. I had a reflector, my monolight, the umbrella reflector for the light, my camera, and that was about it. While in a very dark spot of Brooklyn’s Prospect Park, I had to find a way to make the output of my monolight look much larger and in turn better diffused while also making all of my images from that day not look the same due to the lighting effect.

With very little ambient light in the area, the best way to actually light Katie in the above image was to reflect some sort of light onto her. The idea of using a large five in one reflector and bouncing the light from my monolight off of it came to me. But instead of bouncing the light off of the reflective side, I configured it to be translucent. And by placing the reflector in the right spot, we were able to create this image–which was almost totally illuminated by the monolight output being diffused by the reflector. That’s when it hit me that a viable option is to always diffuse a flash with a reflector.

So despite the fact that reflectors are usually designed to reflect existing light, you should also try to use them as a normal bounce surface for a flash. The most common way for many people to use a hot shoe flash is to bounce it off of a ceiling or surface. But when that surface isn’t available, create one with a reflector.

The Phoblographer Solargraph (2 of 2)

All images by Oli Stevens. Used with permission.

We’ve featured long solargraphs shot with beer cans before, but every time we run across new ones we find something incredibly fascinating. Take this 10 week Solargraph shot by photographer Oli Stevens. Oli is a Biochemistry Masters student, splitting his time between London and Oxford. He’s primarily a 35mm analog photographer who enjoys pushing the technical limits of film photography. What other way to push them than to play with a super long exposure and to work with the most experimental form of the craft: pinhole photography.

To create the image above, Oli created his very own camera from a beer can and used Ilford sheet film to shoot the image. We talked to him more about the setup, the camera, and his photography.

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Phoblographer (5)

All images by Jacob Loafman. Used with permission.

The first year is always the toughest both as a business owner and as a photographer. It’s all about understanding yourself as a shooter, making sure that your business is profitable, and adjusting to the landscape. We found photographer Jacob Loafman and upon hearing that he has been shooting for just under a year, we were quite shocked to see the incredible quality of his work and his success–which is seemingly rare amongst many budding professionals.

Jacob attributes his success partially to his tagline: “Let’s create together.” He admits that the business side was incredibly tough, and that his beginnings were still very humble.

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Video thumbnail for youtube video Using Flashes for Skateboarding Photography - The Phoblographer

One of the best ways to capture extreme sports athletes in their environment is to use a flash. Flash helps to add drama to a scene while also letting you control exactly where you want the light to come from. Combine this with use of a fisheye and you’re usually well equipped to create awesome images.

Take skateboarding for example: photographer Sam McGuire shot a video a little while back on the importance of flash duration when photographing skaters. Flash duration essentially takes over whatever the shutter speed is and works to stop fast moving motion. Typically, studio strobes have much faster flash duration than speedlights and can freeze motion like a skateboarder grinding a rail.

Sam explains that flash durations are measured in fractions of a second, just like shutter speeds. “The faster the flash duration, the sharper your image will be” says Sam.

His video on using flashes for skateboard photography is after the jump.

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Nikon_D750__D810__D610

And just like that Nikon has scored another winner in the DxOMark book with the Nikon D750. Nikon’s latest full frame camera ranked in 8th place on DxOMark’s top list of cameras with an overall score of 93 points.

As we expected the Nikon D750 trails behind the D810 with the latter producing better color depth, dynamic range, and performance in low light. Oddly enough, though, the D750 also lags behind the Nikon D610 by a very slim margin. It seems the entry-level Nikon full frame camera performs ever so slightly better with color depth.

The most striking thing about these results is the Nikon D750 marks the company’s 6th camera to enter DxOMark’s top 10 cameras list. Currently other Nikon models that flank around the D750 include the D810 and D610 as previously mentioned plus the D800, D800E, and D600. Of course, it can be argued that this lineup is really just all Sony sensors, but it’s very apparent Canon and many other brands are not showing up at all.

We’re still working on our own Nikon D750 and we’re honestly blown away by the image quality it puts out and the flexibility of its RAW images. Image samples are after the jump.

Check past the break for a few of our first sample images with the camera