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FAROE-11

All images by Daniel Zvereff. Used with permission.

Photographer Daniel Zvereff was featured last year on the Phoblographer for his Introspective project. During that time Mr. Zvereff was on a tour of self-discovery that we’re sure many photographers and artists take. Interestingly, the project used Kodak Aerochrome to turn greens in his images into purples. Since then, Daniel has completed a number of other personal projects: with one of our favorites being his journey to the island of Faroe. Faroe is an island where there are quite literally more sheep than people.

Beginning a documentary project like this takes planning and lots of thought. So we chatted with Dan about what it’s like to be a documentary photographer and the Faroe project.

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Dancer with second curtain flash

Dramatizing movement is one of the coolest things that you can do in a photograph that otherwise captures it all in a single frame. While many photographers love to do this with long exposures, adding a strobe element via second curtain flash can create even more drama. When you add second curtain flash, what the camera does is freeze a specific moment in the image while dramatizing the movement of the rest of it. It’s a lot of fun–and we do it occasionally in our reviews.

Photographer Phillip McCordall created a tutorial video last month showing us a very proper and fairly old school way ot creating a photo like this in a studio setting with a dancer. He combined second curtain flash usage with a slower shutter speed and just the right aperture and ISO mixture to create the images that you’ll see in the video below.

Want to try this for yourself? We recommend grabbing a dancer or a ballerina. But this can be done with a lot more than just them. I’ve done this with fire dancers and athletes before. You’ll just need to think in terms of a long exposure for the most part.

Mr. McCordall’s video on photographing dancers with long exposures and second curtain flash is after the jump.

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Video thumbnail for youtube video Photographer Joel Grimes Shows You How Effective Reflectors Are - The Phoblographer

They have to be the most underused and overlooked light modifiers out there, but reflectors are also some of the most useful that every photographer should include in their kit. They come in many different shapes, sizes and colors to help you accomplish exactly what you need to do. Adding reflectors are also often a much better alternative to filling in shadows than slowing down your shutter speed is.

Photographer Joel Grimes recently did a video with Westcott featuring their Rapid Box (which we weren’t the biggest fans of) and showing us how a single light positioned above and in front of a model can illuminate them very well but can leave shadows under their chin–which can sometimes make the model look not as flattering depending on the situation. In the one presented in the video, it isn’t that terrible at all.

However, Joel also adds a reflector to the show and shows us a comparison between the two–and effectively demonstrates how the shadows are mostly eliminated.

What’s also important though is the model’s stance and pose. If you look at her during one of the side shots, you can see a bit of Peter Hurley’s influence in the way she sticks the chin out.

Joel’s video with Westcott on how reflectors kill shadows is after the jump.

Via ISO 1200

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony NEX 7 product images (2 of 6)ISO 400

After a relatively quiet appearance at Photokina, Sony might have an exciting new Sony A7000 mirrorless camera complete with a new 24MP sensor coming down the pipeline. The camera will more than likely be a successor to the Sony NEX 7 and Sony Alpha Rumors claims it will arrive in 2015.

An anonymous source suggests the camera will be weather-sealed, retain its rangefinder style, and feature full tethering capabilities. On top of this the Sony A7000 will purportedly have a maximum shutter speed of 1/8000th of a second, which will be great for shooting wide open in daylight. It will also supposedly be the second Alpha camera able to capture 4K footage after the Sony A7s, but it’s not clear whether the Sony A7000 will also need an external recorder to do so. This makes complete sense as the company doesn’t have an APS-C mirrorless camera with weather-sealing. Granted, the A7 series isn’t weather-sealed but is splash and moisture resistant.

Supposedly the Sony A7000 will come kitted with a new mark II version of the 16-50mm f3.5-5.6 power-zoom lens with much improved shooting quality. As it stands the current kit lens that comes with all Sony cameras is pretty terrible with poor corner sharpness and rampant color fringing.

Lastly, Sony is also purportedly working on a new Sony Zeiss 16-70mm f4 lens that will also be weather-sealed. It seems like the company is starting to take the higher end production scale even more seriously if any of this is at all true.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Elinchrom Pro HD 1000 Watt second light product images (11 of 11)ISO 4001-40 sec at f - 3.5

Elinchrom doesn’t have a name as strong Paul C Buff, Profoto, or Broncolor–but their products are in the hands of many pros who do some incredible work with their lights. When we first saw the ELC Pro HD 1000 watt second light at a meeting with the company, we saw some very rudimentary features. And for the most part, Elinchrom isn’t reinventing the wheel. But the big selling points of this light are the 1000 watt second output, 1.4 second recycle time, and the promise of being able to shoot 20fps at the lowest power setting.

But is that enough to make you want to upgrade?

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