web analytics

zeiss touit 32mm sony nex 6

Interviewing a number of photographers this year has made me realize that one of the best ways to actually become a better photographer isn’t to necessarily shoot more like many photographers will tell you to, but to instead shoot less and think more critically and carefully about every single photo that you take. Indeed, a photographer who thinks carefully about each photo that they shoot (in terms of exposure, composition, elements, and overall look) will overall shoot less than someone simply just spraying and praying machine gun style, hoping that each image will yield something better than the last one.

A model that we often shoot for the site recently told me that I’m unlike many other photographers. I know exactly what I want, I shoot it, and I’m done. Others tend to just shoot and shoot and shoot. Folks that have joined me me during my photo walks also say the same thing.

The photographer that sprays and prays will overall come away with more work, but chances are highly against them that they will want to display every single image in their portfolio. To be specific, I’m talking about a photographer presenting their portfolio in an attempt to actually gain better photography work–not someone simply just uploading to their Flickr or 500px.

[click to continue…]

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Click here.

The question of whether one should use TTL vs manual flash output is one that many photographers will experience at one point or another in their careers. Both methods have their advantages and disadvantages. The majority of flashes can shoot in manual mode (thought there are some that indeed can’t and there are also flashes that can do both). But not every flash can fire in TTL mode.

TTL communication requires specific pins on the camera hot shoe and flash to communicate and relay information about the exposure to make the two work together.

In general, TTL has been the king when it comes to photojournalism, weddings, events, and sports. But in situations where you are trying to mix ambient lighting with natural lighting, TTL can be a godsend and eliminate the need for specific metering that will need to be done. In my apartment, I sometimes like shooting a subject in front of a window. Evenly illuminating the subject while properly exposing the outside can be tough, but it is a challenge very easily done by using TTL metering.

Manual light output is typically used on editorial, portrait, headshot, commercial, and fine art photo situations where someone can take their time and set a scene up. It gives the photographer specific control over the light to make it look brighter or darker or exactly the way that they want it. In contrast, a TTL system will read your camera meter and adapt itself to deliver a result that you may not necessarily want.

Manual lighting also works best when working with large light modifiers as a TTL light can sometimes not work so effectively based on various parameters like how large a light modifier is and how far it is positioned from a subject.

Keep this in mind when you’re shooting, and be sure to also check out our massive lighting tutorial roundup.

Leica-Submit-images

Hi everyone,

This is just a note to tell everyone that we’re going to announce the winners of our Leica and Fujifilm contests on Saturday. There are lots and lots of entries in both sections and it’s taking a while to make a decision.

We’re sorry for the inconvenience.

And just to let you know: the most popular image for each contest is not the winner.

Stay tuned!

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer CES 2014 MeFOTO phone adapter (10 of 10)ISO 8001-60 sec at f - 6.3

Since RAW DNG access was unlocked on the Nexus 5 via Camera FV-5, we’ve been playing a bit with it. What we didn’t expect were some incredibly versatile RAW DNG files with very good highlight recovery and pretty good shadow/black level recovery. After bringing the DNG files into Adobe Lightroom 5, we were able to see what the camera’s small sensor is capable of doing.

[click to continue…]

tumblr_inline_nghw91Z21W1qm4rc3

Yesterday, Instagram announced the addition of five new filters to their app. It’s been a while since they introduced new ones, but these are a bit more contemporary than others. The new filters: slumber, crema, ludwig, aden and perpetua are available in the latest update to the app.

Instagram stated in their blog post that these filters were inspired by fashion and design–which probably means that you’re not going to be applying them to your coffee or kitten photos. Of course, you could always be Men’s Wear Dog.

The company also added a new manage button that lets you arrange the filters.

At the moment of publishing this article, they haven’t hit my Nexus 5 yet. But we’re sure that it will roll out to everyone soon.

Kevin Lee The Phoblographer Phase One A-series Product Images-8

Phase One has introduced an all-new line of A-series cameras working together with camera and lens maker, Alpa technology. The new A-series consists of three new camera bodies including the A250, A260, and A280.

The new cameras are based on ALPA’s 12TC mirrorless body. However, each camera is noticeably different from the other. The A280 for instance is a full-frame 645 resolution monster with an 80MP sensor. Meanwhile, the Phase One A260 is equipped with a still admirable 60MP full sensor and capable of hour-long exposures. Lastly, the A250 has a (you guessed it) 50MP medium format sensor plus the ability to stream Live View wireless to an iOS device.

Otherwise the three camera bodies come kitted with a 35mm Rodenstock Alpar lens. Users can also pick up two other available Alpa HR Alpagon lenses including an ultra-side 23 mm or the all around 70mm.

The cameras are available now with the Phase One A250 starting at $47,000, the A260 for $48,000, while the A280 rings up for whopping $55,000. Pricing for the optional Alpa HR Alpagon lenses comes to $9,070 for the 23mm f5.6 and $4,520 for the 70mm f5.6 lens.

See more product specs and images after the break