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Chris Gampat Asta's Multiple exposures (6 of 8)ISO 1001-250 sec at f - 8.0

Is the above image a photograph or is it something else? Is it digital art? Is it something created by someone who took loads of photos and layered them on top of one another?

Even so, does that mean that the image is no longer a photograph?

To create this image, what I did was a multiple exposure in camera. Asta was given instructions to do one pose, then another and then another. Using the Canon 5Ds, I layered each exposure on top of one another. The purists, who say that a photograph is a photograph as long as it just came out of the camera, would argue that this is indeed a photo. But if the images were not done in camera and layered on top of one another in Photoshop, they very much would not call the final image a photograph.

Why?

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Screen Shot 2015-06-22 at 16.35.49

Hey folks,

We’re teaming up with EyeEm in a worldwide contest where we’re giving away a brand new Canon 6D DSLR. Want ot know how to win? Hit the jump for the rules and info from EyeEm

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm XT10 first impressions (2 of 15)ISO 2001-750 sec at f - 1.4

Want more useful photography tips? Click here.

Cameras by default are set to metering a scene through the evaluative setting, but they have three different settings. Evaluative will analyze an entire scene and figure out a way to create the scene that the camera thinks you want. Center-weighted metering meters a scene based on what’s in the center of whatever the camera is pointing at and sees. Spot metering meters the scene off of a specific spot that you choose. This is best used in combination with manual autofocus point selection.

Most people shoot and never think about their metering mode. Then when they chimp their LCD screen and don’t like the image, they simply just overexpose or underexpose. But to avoid that altogether, the best route to take is to first consider what you want in the end vision of your photo.

In the image above, Erica was being strongly backlit by the sunlight coming down the avenue. In the evaluative mode, the camera would have compensated for this and made her very dark in order to cater to the highlights. But in spot metering mode, the camera metered for her face due to my metering off of it and autofocusing off of it.

If I didn’t switch to spot metering, the camera would have needed to be set to overexpose the scene by around a stop at most. This can save you a bunch of time in post-production but it can also just make your life easier as far as actually getting the image you want the first time around goes.

In general, the best reason to use spot metering would have to be if only a specific thing in the scene is more important to you and the image more than anything else–such as with a portrait. With a landscape, you’re probably best off with evaluative metering unless you spot meter the highlights, then spot meter the shadows, then find a happy medium point. If you figure this out, you can then go ahead and get the exact photo that you want with less attempts.

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 90mm f2 first impressions product images (1 of 9)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 3.2

While Fujifilm has had the 56mm f1.2 X lens available, they’ve lacked a longer and more flattering portrait lens. But earlier this year, the company announced their 90mm f2, which has a 135mm equivalent field of view. To date, it’s the company’s biggest prime lens and in some ways is almost as large as the DSLR equivalent that we’ve seen on the market. With a large focusing ring, it’s also quite nice to hold while remaining ergonomically balanced with many of the company’s higher end cameras.

The Fujifilm 90mm f2 R LM WR lens has a $949 price point and incorporates weather sealing, seven aperture blades, three extra low dispersion elements, Super EBC lens coatings, and 11 elements in 8 groups. Weighing 1.19lbs, it’s also fairly hefty for a lens designed for a mirrorless camera.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

One of the biggest features of a great food photo has to do with the way that the colors pop out and seem to grab you. Many photographers know that it’s all about the lighting, the textures, the props and any little touches that are added in to make the food even more scrumptious. One of the technical ways to create an image that makes your viewers hungry has to do with contrast. This is the reason why so many food photos have colors that are very dominant and others that add punch and grab your attention.

Here are a couple of tips to help you create more vivid and beautiful food photos.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Canon G1X review images (21 of 28)ISO 3201-320 sec at f - 2.0

There are a number of things to consider before setting out on a trip – lodging, money, luggage, etc. – and for photographers, taking pictures is very close to the top of the list. If you’re visiting a city you haven’t been to before, it’s wise to do a little research before you go in order to get a sense of the place and know what to bring. If you’re starting out, here are some things to keep in mind ahead of your trip to a new metropolis. [click to continue…]