Moo’s Latest Business Cards are Made From Cotton

Lots of photographers have trusted MOO for years when it comes to business cards. And now the company just got a whole lot cooler. They just announced Cotton business cards. Yes, Cotton. If you’re a photographer who prints often, then this isn’t only exciting but also very familiar. You see, lots of papers these days are made with cotton because it gives you a much different quality and feel than what’s possible with paper. Some papers are a mixture of trees and cotton.

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Canton Vander Built’s Beautiful Classical Take on Black and White Photography

All images by Canton Vander Built. Used with permission.

Photographer Canton Vander Built describes himself as a photographer who is more interested in light, form, movement, color, perspective, and shutter speed than in any particular genre of photography. To that end, he says that his favorite subjects are those that are present before him at the time. At the other end of the spectrum, CVB’s work explores the boundaries between recognizable imagery and the most minimal aspects of shadow and light that comprise an “image.”

Canton draws influence form Anne W. Brigman, Martin Munkacsi, Seydou Keita, Daido Moriyama, and Francesca Woodman. When he shoots, he’s most likely toting around his Lecia SL with Vario-Elmarit-SL 24-90mm f2.8-4. But don’t scoff just yet, because he’s also a fan of the Nikon D810 with Nikkor AF-S 50mm f/1.8G and a few other pieces.

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The New Rollei Vario Chrome is a Versatile Slide Film

It’s a great day when a new film emulsion is announced, and the new Rollei Vario Chrome was just born into the world. Rollei states that it’s a slide film that seems to be pretty versatile. It can be exposed between ISO 200 and ISO 400. Specifically, it’s being targeted for use in low-level daylight illumination–so think about a cloudy day or something like that. Additionally, Rollei Vario Chrome has a warmer color tone to it which a lot of folks may really like since many modern digital photos tend to go warmer vs cooler.

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Review: Lensbaby Velvet 85mm f1.8 (Sony E Mount, Full Frame)

When the Lensbaby Velvet 85mm f1.8 was put into my hands a few months ago, I was really curious about this lens. The previous one coming in at 56mm was incredibly soft. Now, that’s all part of the charm of the Velvet series–but when it’s so soft that focus peaking sometimes won’t even work, then it can be tough to get anything in focus with the lens. But the Lensbaby Velvet 85mm f1.8 is different in a whole bunch of ways. It’s still soft wide open, but you can make that work for you in a number of ways: one of which is to work with a studio flash system.

With the announcement of the Lensbaby Velvet 85mm f1.8 available in a number of mounts, this only makes the choice of which 85mm lens to choose for the Sony camera system even more difficult.

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The Lomography Lomo’Instant Wide Gets a Legitimate Modification

All images by Albertino. Used courtesy of his website and blog post.

In many ways, the Lomography Lomo’Instant Wide an almost perfect Instant film camera except for the fact that it doesn’t have manual exposure abilities. But Albertino, the same man that designed the Lego Instax camera, finally has his own hack. The hack involves taking the lens off the camera and using a third party one mounted to it.

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Review: Platypod Pro Max

I’ve had the Platypod Pro Max in my possession for a really long time now; and my lack of getting this review out doesn’t have to do with laziness or priorities, but instead trying to illustrate how it’s actually useful for many photographers. You see, the Platypod Pro Max is marketed as being able to go where tripods can’t. But at the same time, it doesn’t have a lot of the same advantages of a tripod. You can’t extend its height because it’s a flat plate, but you can indeed place it in a variety of other flat surfaces. So with that said you pretty much just secure a ball head onto this thing, then put your camera on and you’ve got something that you’re ready to work with. But then the question begs why you’d still use it to begin with.

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A Critique of Portraits with Tony and Chelsea Northrup

On last week’s episode of Tony and Chelsea Live, I joined them to critique a few portraits from their readers. The portraits ranged greatly with some photographers being very experienced and refined while others were still just getting into it. But the important thing is to never give up.

Anyway, when you’ve got a few minutes, I strongly recommend watching the video, which is after the jump and a little bit over an hour long.

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Review: Kodak TMax 400 (35mm and 120)

Kodak T-Max 400 doesn’t get all the love, love letters, and overall adoration that Kodak Tri-X 400 does simply because of the fact that a ton of the most iconic photos in the world were shot on Tri-X 400 vs T-Max 400. However, part of that has to do with the fact that Tri-X has been around for a longer period of time and T-Max 400 is designed to do something much different. While Tri-X 400 is known for its characteristic midtones and grain, T-Max 400 is instead known for its fairly high contrast (in the highlights and shadows), its incredibly fine grain and its overall sharpness. It’s touted to be the sharpest black and white 400 speed film in the world. Indeed, there has been a movement in the black and white photography world towards the high contrast, crispy, sharp look. And that’s essentially what Kodak T-Max 400 can do while still retaining a fair amount of details in the midtones. It does it in a much different way from a film like Japan Camera Hunter Street Pan 400–which is a near infrared film. Yet it also differs from many of the Ilford emulsions.Before you go on, more of the specific technical details of using Kodak T-Max 400 can be found in this Kodak PDF file.

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