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Hi everyone,

This is just a note to tell everyone that we’re going to announce the winners of our Leica and Fujifilm contests on Saturday. There are lots and lots of entries in both sections and it’s taking a while to make a decision.

We’re sorry for the inconvenience.

And just to let you know: the most popular image for each contest is not the winner.

Stay tuned!

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer CES 2014 MeFOTO phone adapter (10 of 10)ISO 8001-60 sec at f - 6.3

Since RAW DNG access was unlocked on the Nexus 5 via Camera FV-5, we’ve been playing a bit with it. What we didn’t expect were some incredibly versatile RAW DNG files with very good highlight recovery and pretty good shadow/black level recovery. After bringing the DNG files into Adobe Lightroom 5, we were able to see what the camera’s small sensor is capable of doing.

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Yesterday, Instagram announced the addition of five new filters to their app. It’s been a while since they introduced new ones, but these are a bit more contemporary than others. The new filters: slumber, crema, ludwig, aden and perpetua are available in the latest update to the app.

Instagram stated in their blog post that these filters were inspired by fashion and design–which probably means that you’re not going to be applying them to your coffee or kitten photos. Of course, you could always be Men’s Wear Dog.

The company also added a new manage button that lets you arrange the filters.

At the moment of publishing this article, they haven’t hit my Nexus 5 yet. But we’re sure that it will roll out to everyone soon.

Kevin Lee The Phoblographer Phase One A-series Product Images-8

Phase One has introduced an all-new line of A-series cameras working together with camera and lens maker, Alpa technology. The new A-series consists of three new camera bodies including the A250, A260, and A280.

The new cameras are based on ALPA’s 12TC mirrorless body. However, each camera is noticeably different from the other. The A280 for instance is a full-frame 645 resolution monster with an 80MP sensor. Meanwhile, the Phase One A260 is equipped with a still admirable 60MP full sensor and capable of hour-long exposures. Lastly, the A250 has a (you guessed it) 50MP medium format sensor plus the ability to stream Live View wireless to an iOS device.

Otherwise the three camera bodies come kitted with a 35mm Rodenstock Alpar lens. Users can also pick up two other available Alpa HR Alpagon lenses including an ultra-side 23 mm or the all around 70mm.

The cameras are available now with the Phase One A250 starting at $47,000, the A260 for $48,000, while the A280 rings up for whopping $55,000. Pricing for the optional Alpa HR Alpagon lenses comes to $9,070 for the 23mm f5.6 and $4,520 for the 70mm f5.6 lens.

See more product specs and images after the break

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Metz flash product photos (1 of 10)ISO 6401-50 sec at f - 4.0

Editor’s Correction: In an earlier version of this article, we called the flash the 54 AF-1. It is indeed the 64 AF-1. We apologize for this mistake.

Metz believes that the future of the flash is very…touchy. To be specific, we’re talking about a touch screen. So when the 64 AF-1 was shown to us around Photokina 2014, we were quite intrigued. The flashes are available for Canon, Nikon, Fujifilm, Sony and the Micro Four Thirds world. It tries to be futuristic with its massive touch LCD screen. Metz has been long known in the industry for having a more affordable alternative to the camera manufacturers, but in recent years they’ve stepped back to Phottix, Lumopro and Yongnuo.

The Metz 64 AF-1 otherwise is like many flashes on the market: it can rotate around and tilt its head. Unlike Sony’s flashes, the 64 AF-1 isn’t a cobra head design. But like many of Sony’s flashes, some of the settings can be controlled via the camera thanks to its interactions from the multi-interface shoe. This means that it will work with the NEX 6, A7, A7s, A7r, A7 Mk II, A99, A77, A77 Mk II and a couple of others.

The flash is also one of the first designed for the new Sony shoe since the company introduced it a couple of years ago. While it’s a good first attempt, it fails in certain aspects.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Olympus OMD EM10 product photos (3 of 7)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 4.5

Sony and Olympus entered a gentleman’s agreement years ago to start collaborating in closer ways. With the latest announcement of the Sony A7 Mk II, it’s easy to believe that they have the same stabilization process. For many years now, Olympus has held the honor of having the best in-body image stabilization that we’ve seen. Indeed, whenever I need to shoot in impossibly low light, the camera that I reach for is my OMD EM5 paired with a Voigtlander 17.5mm f0.95 lens to shoot at very slow shutter speeds and with the lens wide open. Due to the depth of field and size of the sensor, shooting at f0.95 gives me the full frame equivalent of f2 in focus.

In a situation like that, technology like this could be very advantageous. But that isn’t a reason to discount what Sony is doing with its new 5 Axis Stabilization.

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