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Canon EOS 6D

Canon, Nikon and so many more are offering discounts right now on lenses, cameras and more.

In the edition of Cheap Photo, we show you some of our favorite deals and those that are about to expire. All the best camera deals, lens deals, and discounts are right here.

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Screenshot taken from the video

Screenshot taken from the video

Photographer Peter Hurley needs no introduction as a headshot and portrait photographer; and it’s always interesting to listen to his stories. For example, why does he say SHABANG during portrait sessions? Peter talks about it in the video after the jump and explains that it’s in reaction to a feeling that you get when you capture the perfect headshot from someone.

On a deeper level, he talks about not settling for mediocre images and instead getting the ones that elicit an emotion out of someone and creating images that move people. That’s what we should aspire to create.

“My inner artist wants to look at my screen and see a killer picture.” says Hurley.

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Screenshot taken from the video

Screenshot taken from the video

Effective compositions can overcome pretty much any technique that you use to make your image beautiful, with the exception of content. Photographer Tony Northrup tries to explain this and also includes things depth, planes, etc. In fact, he tries to talk about a balance of content in the image and the composition itself. And while he doesn’t spend much time doing so, we get an idea that composition and content need to be balanced in some way or another to create more effective and interesting images.

Tony’s video on more effective composition is after the jump.

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Pro Tip: The larger the light modifier is, the softer the light will be on your subject in relation to distance from them.

Pro Tip: The larger the light modifier is, the softer the light will be on your subject in relation to distance from them.

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Click here.

Your camera is at the lowest ISO setting it could possibly organically be at, your shutter speed has hit the maximum setting, and you still want to shoot an image with the lens wide open. The challenge: the sun is way too bright and giving off too much light to let you get anything near a correct exposure.

So how do you shoot the photo? There are three different ways.

The first one is the simplest and least expensive. Try to backlight the subject. Of course, this is tougher if your subject is a flower or your children running around because it means you need to get very low to the ground. But otherwise it’s a solid option.

The second option: use a shoot through umbrella or a translucent reflector to diffuse the sunlight. This will usually kill enough of it to let you get a more balanced exposure. In the case of the umbrella, it can also be used as a fun prop.

The final option: try a variable ND filter–which is what film photographers used to use. These filters let you cut out a specific amount of like that you set them to just by turning them. The quality of these filters has improved so much that it’s bound to not ruin the quality of your image.

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All images by Lester Cannon. Used with permission; also be sure to check out our previous interview with Lester.

This was a Facebook comment left by a very passionate film photographer I was chatting with in a group a few months ago. I thought to myself, “That sounds pretty harsh”. As I thought more about what he wrote, the words ring true. Here’s why…

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Image by photographer James Douglas.

Editor’s Note: This is a syndicated blog post from Photographer James Douglas. It is being used with permission, as are all images in this post.

Here at TJDS, we have some pretty strict guidelines for utilizing and sharing the images that we create; the literature to explain our guidelines looks pretty daunting attached to an email, but we hope it isn’t taken that way. Our goal at the studio as well as around town is to educate everyone from artists just getting started to our clients (since one can be just as misinformed as the other on many issues) on the proper ways to credit and distribute creative work.

One of the most important, yet frequently overlooked aspects of the creative process is providing appropriate credit to the artist(s) who create. Another overlooked aspect is the need to respect artistic vision and not altering the art from it’s original form. Hopefully this post will mitigate a lot of unpleasant conversations about why an individual, company, celebrity, organization, etc. would need to give credit to the artist they are working with when utilizing original artwork. Why so much emphasis on artistic credit? Because there are so many ways proper credit can benefit our business and literally no way it could negatively impact a client’s. As a photographer the following points will largely apply to my chosen medium but what I’ll attempt to explain(without pissing too many people off) is fairly universal across the artistic spectrum.

So here goes.

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