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Sessøya

All images by Mark Roberts. Used with permission.

Photographer Mark Roberts is an English photographer based in Lapland–more precisely right on the arctic circle in Rovaniemi, Finland. Mark got into backpacking due to his love of the wilderness which eventually turned into the creation of his blog, Backpacking North. This is how he combined his love of photography with hiking.

His photography work and knowledge eventually turned into him leading photo tours–which is a big leap from his humble beginnings of working in the darkroom in high school.

Mark’s knowledge of shooting landscapes is incredible and helped him overall become a better photography by not really chasing the light, but making it work for him.

Mark tells us “If I sat around waiting for golden hour on a backpacking trip I wouldn’t get very far. It’s far more important to exercise your skills and take photographs at all times of the day, and more importantly in all conditions.”

Our interview with Mark is after the jump.

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Screenshot taken from the video

Screenshot taken from the video

Digital Rev recently compared the Canon 70D against the Nikon D7200 and Canon 7D Mk II. Why two Canon cameras? Because the Nikon D7200 is pretty much designed to take on both of them with the 7D Mk II targeting the higher end and the 70D going a bit lower end in some ways.

The hosts play a ridiculous game to test the autofocus system and mention specifics when it comes to the intricacies of the focusing system. It involves playing with the cameras FPS or paintball style where headshots count. This is a creative and fun way of doing it; and eventually it seems like the 7D Mk II and Nikon D7200 are the top contenders.

Check out who wins in the Canon 70D vs Nikon D7200 vs Canon 7D Mk II comparison after the jump.

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The-Phoblographer-What-to-Pay-Attention-to-in-a-Portrait-Infographic

For the photographers looking to get into portraiture, consider this infographic with specifically marked areas and field notes for you to pay attention to when looking at a subject. This infographic emphasizes what you should be mindful of for an upper half portrait. When the other half of the subject is involved, then there is much more to worry about. In general, these are the areas that we always look at when shooting a portrait, but something there can be much more.

Enjoy!

Zachary Shenal Adventure (7 of 15)

All images by Zachary Shenal. Used with permission.

Photographer Zach Shenal has been shooting adventure work for around a year and a half, and his work is bound to make him one of the more up and coming adventure photographers that we’ve seen in a while. After buying a DSLR while in the US military, he got really into photography. He started out shooting landscapes until the photo bug bit him and he was reading every tutorial he could find.

“I never really got into portraits as passionately as landscapes, but there is just something pleasing about showing a person interact with his/her environment.” Zach tells the Phoblographer in his pitch email.

Zach has an interesting sense of composition and creates scenes that show drama and use photojournalistic elements to tell stories. All of these combined make him an excellent adventure photographer that we just had to talk to.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Olympus OMD EM5 Mk II first impressions product photos (4 of 10)ISO 1001-200 sec at f - 2.8

With the release of Adobe Lightroom CC, we’ve updated our Olympus OMD EM5 Mk II review. The verdict? This has to be the single best four thirds sensor that we’ve tested. It’s got it all: high ISO results, RAW file versatility that we’ve never seen before, and an autofocus system that puts most others to shame.

Check out our full and complete review now.

Pinhole coastline

Pinhole photography requires you to think about motion, careful composition, and at the same time be willing to experiment with your luck. You’re often shooting at a lower ISO setting and with an extremely narrow aperture to create the images that you get. Most of it is also quite wide, too. But to get better pinhole photos, what you need to do is think about your scenes and start seeing the world in a totally different way considering that your camera isn’t capturing a more conventional image.

And if you’re looking for cameras, then check out these modern and DIY cameras.

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