web analytics
Image Courtesy of Leo Catricala and Hyunsung Cho/Hartford University

Image Courtesy of Leo Catricala and Hyunsung Cho/University of Hartford

Today nearly every person in the world has a camera whether it be a cellphone camera, point-and-shoot, mirrorless camera, DSLRs, Go Pros, aerial drones—you get the idea. While photography is well and alive now, that wasn’t always the case. The Smithsonian Magazine has put together an excellent article looking back over a century detailing the photography first went mainstream.

The thing about early cameras is they used chemically treated plates and paper that took ages to capture an exposure and required subjects to stay still for a half-minute or more. It’s the reason why early portraitures looked so stoic and serious. But enter 1888 and George Eastman introduced the first compact, film-based Kodak camera. The new camera was not only much smaller measuring 2.5-inches in diameter, it was also affordable at $25 and held a roll of film for 100 exposures.

The much more accessible camera allowed many more people to carry cameras outdoors and the public was entranced by the ability to capture the world. Even if they were the most mundane of everyday events, new Kodak photographers would take pictures of bicycles, pets, or themselves. Taking snapshots became a fad and with the introduction of the $1 Brownie camera in 1900 a third of American households owned a camera of some sort by 1905.

While it might seem like photography was universally liked, professional photographers were actually against seeing their art becoming popularized by amateurs. Supposedly paid photographers did not appreciate these “Kodak fiends” who became completely engrossed with taking weird and often out of focus shots.

Now photography has become much more mundane and commonplace, but the controversy has spun out to taking advantage of people’s privacy. With the advent of wearable cameras like Google Glass and aerial drones, photographers now face a new wave of criticism accusing them of sneaky forms of voyeurism to creep shots from above.

Via Smithsonian Magazine

 

Video thumbnail for youtube video Lindsay Adler on TTL vs Manual Lighting - The Phoblographer

Photographer Lindsay Adler has to be one of the better lighting instructors of our time. And in this recent video from creativeLive, she demonstrates the main differences between TTL metering and manual exposure metering when it comes to lighting.

While many folks seem to absolutely love and completely rely on TTL metering, Lindsay shows you that it can only do so much. Modern TTL flash systems deliver the exposure that it thinks that you want whereas manual exposures are set by you. So when working with TTL lights, you’ll need to usually find some way to compensate for their shortcomings–which can sometimes be frustrating in real life.

Check out the video after the jump.

[click to continue…]

IMG_2820

All images and part of the research by Ken Toda. Used with permission.

Leica cameras have more or less always been considered the kings of street photography and documentary work. It has been argued that adding a flash can take away from the stealth approach–but this flash that we found really takes the cake on that claim. Photographer John Oliver got a hold of the camera and showed it off on Reddit. When we asked us about it. He directed us to Ken Toda.

Ken tells us that he got his hands on a book that told the history of Leica and the Leitz company. Apparently, this is a special flash on the III-c model camera above dating back to around 1940. The 35mm cameras and flashes were sold to the US Signal Corp and Navy right before Dec 1941–which is essentially pre WWII.

Ken continues to say, “I did not open the bottom plate unit, but as you can see, on its back there is a slide adjustment (black lines including one red). The main shutter drum is coupled to this bottom trigger devise that has quite complex-precise ‘TIMING’ contact as later applied into III-f model dial on top (numbers around top shutter dial. This IIIc trigger is pre IIIf…”

More images of the flash, camera and pages from the book are after the jump.

[click to continue…]

K-S1_black_001

Leave it to Ricoh/Pentax to create one of the flashies DSLRs around–and we’re not talking about something strobists would particularly love. The company recently announced the new KS-1 DSLR that stands to be their entry level model. Before we even get to the major tech specs though, we think that it’s totally worth it to note the LED lights along the side of the camera and also bring your attention to the fact that the back has even more LEDs. It’s a pretty cool design concept, but we’re not sure that everyone would want the attention brought to their digicam.

Moving to what really matters, the camera houses a 20MP APS-C CMOS sensor capable of producing images at up to ISO 51,200. The camera also has in-body camera shake reduction on the sensor, an AA filter simulator, 100% viewfinder, 5.4fps shooting capabilities, 1/6000th shutter speed shooting, and a 3 inch 921K dot LCD screen on the back.

By modern day standards, the screen is a bit antiquated. However, with different colors and coming in at a price of $749.99 body only, you can’t complain very much.

More images are after the jump.

[click to continue…]

Kevin-Lee The Phoblographer Sigma dp2 Quattro Product Images (1 of 8)

The Sigma Quattro is quite the odd duck in the photography world. It has the body of a body of a smartphone, a fat lens like the Sony QX-10, and lastly Sigma stuck on a DSLR grip—except backwards.

Underneath this peculiar exterior lies an equally unique Foveon sensor that you don’t see in many other cameras. Sigma claims its sensor can resolve images with brilliant colors and enough eye-popping detail to make regular 36MP Bayer sensors weep. Now lets see if the Foveon sensor is everything its cracked up to be, or is the dp2 Quattro just a weirdly shaped for the sake of it?

[click to continue…]

Kevin Lee The Phoblographer Olympus PEN E-PL7 Product Images-9

Olympus has announced the PEN E-PL7, the company’s latest Micro Four Thirds camera since unveiling the OMD EM10 way back in January. The new compact system camera not only follows the OMD EM10 it also borrows much of its internals including a 16.1MP Live MOS sensor, TruePic VII image processor, and three-axis VCM image stabilization system. It’s not the most original camera from Olympus, but if the E-PL7’s image quality is on par with the OMD EM10, users will be very happy with camera indeed.

The Olympus PEN E-PL7 also features a new 3-inch, 104K dot touchscreen LCD that flips down a full 180-degrees. When fully flipped the screen sits below the camera body much like the Sony A77 Mark II and faces user for (what else, but) selfies. The new PEN also boasts 8fps sequential shooting without autofocus or 3.5fps with Continuous Auto Focus with tracking modes turned on.

On the software side, Olympus has improved its OI.Share smartphone software allowing users to control even more features of the E-PL7 though a Wi-Fi connected device. New features include a new custom self-timer for setting up a timelapse and “selfie interval shooting.” Olympus has also has added Live Bulb mode to OI.Share allowing users to control and monitor and control bulb photography from a mobile device.

The Olympus PEN E-PL7 will be available in late September in black and silver colors for $599.99 body only or $699.99 when kitted with the M.Zuiko 14-42 mm f3.5-5.6 II R lens.

Lastly Olympus is introducing a black version of its M.Zuiko digital 12mm f2.0 lens, which should pair nicely with Olympus’ all black OMD and PEN cameras. As with the silver version the blacked out 12mm f2.0 lens will retail for $799.99. Check past the break for more images and specs. [click to continue…]