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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Panasonic 42.5mm f1.2 review product images (7 of 7)ISO 2001-500 sec at f - 1.7

Behold: the Panasonic 42.5mm f1.2. Yes, an f1.2 autofocusing lens is here for the Micro Four Thirds system. Customers have ben dreaming about a lens like this for many years and as the system has grown up, so too have its optics offerings.

We’re very much inclined to say that this portrait lens is something that you’ll never want to let go of. In collaboration with Leica, Panasonic has created something that is sharp, delivers great colors with skin tones, and isn’t too heavy.

And if anything is holding you back, it will really only be the price.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 60mm f2.4 review product photos (4 of 8)ISO 4001-50 sec at f - 4.0

We’ve found even more deals to add onto yesterday’s, and you Fujifilm owners are in for a treat. Check out what we found after the jump.

Oh yeah, and the Nikon D810 is in stock at B&H Photo.

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Photo by Raúl González on Flickr

Photo by Raúl González on Flickr

These are hard times for photographers, even in a country where freedom and liberty are our basic human rights. Amateur photographers are getting beat up for taking photos in public spaces, and even professional photographers who work for big publications are getting arrested for doing their jobs.

As with everybody else, we are governed by laws, regulations, and considerations for others that we must respect and abide by, especially if we expect the same courtesy from others. But we absolutely should know our rights as photographers in the United States, so that we know, or have at least an idea of, where we stand during delicate and tricky encounters.

While it seems that police officers (and at times, the public) are cracking down on photographers, the fact of the matter is taking pictures of things in plain sight in a public space is our constitutional right.

In an attempt to squelch the “widespread, continuing pattern of law enforcement officers ordering people to stop taking photographs or video in public places, and harassing, detaining and arresting those who fail to comply,” the American Civil Liberties Union has released a detailed list of photographer rights that will hopefully define that fine line between what we can and cannot do in complicated situations like taking photos of “federal buildings, transportation facilities, and police and other government officials carrying out their duties.”

Here are some of the important ones from the list:

  • When in public spaces where you are lawfully present you have the right to photograph anything that is in plain view.
  • When you are on private property, the property owner may set rules about the taking of photographs.
  • Police officers may not confiscate or demand to view your digital photographs or video without a warrant.
  • Police may not delete your photographs or video under any circumstances.
  • Police officers may legitimately order citizens to cease activities that are truly interfering with legitimate law enforcement operations.

Via ACLU

Nikon 6mm f2.8 Image 1

One of the world’s rarest and most exotic Nikon 6mm f2.8 fisheye lenses is now on sale on eBay for an eye-popping $96,187.50. The lens is the stuff of legend in the 35mm film camera days. Originally released in 1970, the lens boasts a field of view of 220-degrees, allowing it to literally see behind itself.

Supposedly the lens was originally developed for special scientific and industrial use according to the seller’s description. This “special wider-than-180-degreee picture coverage [was] required for surveillance work, photographing the interiors of pipes, boilers, conduits, cylinder bores, and other constricted areas.”

Despite the lens’ relatively short barrel length, it’s made up of 12 elements in 9 groups. On the front end there’s a front dome-shaped end piece of glass that’s actually five built-in filters.

Weighing in at a hefty 5.2 kilograms (11-pounds) and measuring 236mm (9.2-inches) in diameter, this is a lens that will be a pain to move around and it’ll almost always need a tripod. The seller also notes that the Nikon 6mm f2.8 is a more of a status lens than something you’ll ever take out. However, photographers who need to shoot tight interiors or want a completely unique look to their landscape images can’t ask (quite literally) for a wider lens.

While many of you won’t be able to buy this incredibly expensive lens, you can check out more images of it after the break.

Via eBay

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

ONA has always created beautiful and simplistic camera bags. And today’s announcement of the Leather Price Street is no exception to their award winning lineup. Designed for street photographers and those with a more mobile/guerilla oriented shooting style, we’re sure that any shooter would wear this bag with pride.

With a full leather exterior, superb interior padding, and a suggested retail price of $389 we’d like to remind you at this point in the article to please ensure that the drool from your mouth doesn’t hit the keyboard–that’s just unattractive and embarrassing when you take it in for repair and tell the techs.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Samsung 85mm f1.4 portraits extra (1 of 1)ISO 1001-125 sec at f - 2.8

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Check them out here.

In the photo world, there are loads and loads of tricks that you can use to make viewers of your images believe that you’ve shot something with either all natural light or with one primary light. And if you have only a single light to begin with, there are ways that you can make your image appear as if two lights were added to the scene. All it requires is a bit a strategic placement of your lights or some extra knowledge of exposures.

For starters, keep in mind that when working with an artificial light (strobe or flash) that your aperture will control your flash exposure while your shutter speed manipulates the ambient lighting in the scene. Somehow or another, you’re going to have to figure out a way to balance the two out.

So how do you do this?:

- A very large light modifier in relation to your subject: Usually a six or seven foot umbrella being placed in front of and slightly above your subject can make your scene look like it was lit with two lights when the according shutter speed is dialed in.

- One Light and a Reflector: When your light is on one side of the subject, either set the light to its widest zoom setting or put it into a large softbox.. Next, place a reflector on the other side of your subject–we recommend using either white or silver. Then use the shutter speed to mix in enough ambient lighting to fill in the shadows while balancing out the flash output.

One light and the shadows for evenness control: To make this one work, you’ll need to work outside and in a shadowed area of some sort. Bounce the light off of a surface or once again make the flash zoom out to its widest setting. After this, you’ll just need to mix the ambient lighting from the shutter speed accordingly. We recommend underexposing your shutter just a bit then raising the shadows in post.

Now get out there and go experiment.