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All images by Jason Arber. Used with permission.

Photographer Jason Arber spent a number of years as a print designer mostly creating record sleeves, including a limited edition boxset of Oasis singles in the shape of a cigarette box (and an even rarer version in the shape of a Vox amplifier), and a limited edition metal box version of Janet Jackson’s Design of a Decade. As the internet era arrived, he migrated into web design, creating sites for the BBC and MTV, and co-founding the hugely popular online design and culture magazine, Pixelsurgeon, with my illustrator and photographer buddy Richie May, who is a frequent collaborator to this day.

He now heads up Phantom Limb–specialising in moving image and photography. He is now represented in the UK as a photographer by Werewolf.

During our recent call for strobist style portraits, Jason reached out to us showcasing a specific project for a fashion label called Persons Unknown. But we also discovered lots more of his excellent and unorthodox portraiture.

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Today, Lomography is announcing something that, well, we’re not totally sure what the heck it does. At least technically speaking or how it works seems to be a mystery to us.

It’s called the Lomo’Instant Splitzer and it designed to work with the Lomo’Instant. According to their email description, you can “mix two of your friends’ faces in one shot, combine different scenes in a picture, or pair unlikely objects in one photo!…The new Lomo’Instant Splitzer allows you to “call the shots” by slicing-and-dicing your images, making them more unique and experimental.”

What it sort of seems to be doing is cutting each photo into a half frame and only exposing one half at a time to mess with the shutters. Olympus did something like this years ago in the film world with their Pen cameras by taking 35mm film and shooting it one half frame at a time.

That technically means that you can get 20 shots from a single 10 pack of film. We have yet to see this used very creatively, but it’s kind of a cool concept for $16.90.

More sample images are after the jump.

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“DSLRs got big, bloated and fat.” says Kai from DigitalRev in the company’s latest video explaining why you don’t need a DSLR camera. For the most part, it seems like they’re also drinking the mirrorless camera Kool-Aid. Then they go into the technical stuff.

Admittedly, you may want to work with a DSLR because of their bigger versatility and support for using accessories like flashes and lenses–or if you want to work with an optical viewfinder. For what it’s worth though, electronic viewfinders have improved a lot and give you a preview of what you’re going to shoot. Kai also states that DSLRs are loud and uncool. He makes a great point and them not being innovative anymore and reaching their peak.

In fact, most of us use mirrorless cameras.

The video is after the jump.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sigma 24mm f1.4 first impressions (2 of 5)ISO 1001-25 sec at f - 1.4

Very recently, we had the chance to play with the Sigma 24mm f1.4 lens that was recently announced. As the latest addition to the Art series of lenses, this is Sigma’s third full frame prime lens that is part of their Global Vision initiative. The lens has a minimum focusing distance of 9.8 inches. Additionally, the 24mm incorporates both “F” Low Dispersion (FLD) glass and Special Low Dispersion (SLD) glass, has an optical formula 15 elements in 11 groups which the company claims to help to minimize chromatic aberration of magnification especially in the edge of the image field, and has aspherical elements placed near the rear of the lens. Finally, the lens has manual focus override even when the autofocus is activated.

We played with a pre-production copy, and what we saw got us more excited than any other lens that we’ve seen so far.

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julius motal the phoblographer street photographers getting over fear eric kim image 05 Suits-8

In this episode of ISO 400, we talk with Eric Kim. While he may need no introduction for some, he is an international street photographer and educator. He’s known for the Eric Kim Street Photography Blog, which has been a tremendous resource for anyone looking to get their start in street photography. Kim started the blog when he realized that there were hardly any resources for street photography.

The blog has been somewhat of a journey for him. As he learns things about the craft, he turns them into blog posts. He interviews and features the work of other photographers, and he teaches workshops all over the world.

Here, he tells us more about what got him into the craft, what it means to be a street photographers, thoughts on his own work, and much more.

For more of Eric’s work, head on over to his website, check out his Facebook page, and visit the blog. Some examples of his work are down below.

As always, our music is provided by Yuki Futami, a New York-based jazz musician.

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Kevin-Lee The Phoblographer Nikon 20mm f1.8G ED Product Images (1 of 12)

In this edition of Cheap Photo, lots of the previous discounts are still available; so you’d better act on them while you can. But Amazon seems to be clearing out lots of stock with deals on DSLRs, mirrorless cameras, point and shoots, camera bundlesaccessories, and even lenses.

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