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diybunting10

I find few things as satisfying as putting together wall art that has a truly personal touch. Why buy a random print from Target when you can easily make something that really says something about you? The crafting world has fallen hard for bunting in recent years, and although I’ve seen dozens of bunting kits sold online, I’m more given over to handmade bunting. It not only has a more authentic touch – it’s cheaper, too!

I’ve made polaroid photo bunting throughout my apartment with a few cheap supplies I had already stocked and some polaroid photos of my friends and my favorite vacation spots. The beauty of this project is that you can buy really cute clothespins or paper clips to hang your items with, or go super simple with whatever you have at hand for a shabby chic touch. Check it out:

Editor’s Note: this is a guest blog post by Jessica Michelle Fregni. It was originally published on Bee’s Beautiful World.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Tamron 70-200mm f2.8 VC image samples (22 of 36)ISO 2001-100 sec at f - 2.8

Many folks have heard of them. A long time ago, we wrote an introduction to the rule of thirds, but it’s been in serious need to a revamp. The Rule of Thirds is one of the biggest rules in the photography world that every instructor and other photographers tell you to follow. But it is very easy to get too caught up in that and not focusing on subject matter.

And in the end, subject matter and content are king. To that end, the rule of thirds can sometimes be thrown right out the window.

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Photo by Alex Pines

Photo by Alex Pines

With the recent stirrings that have been happening in regards to concert photography first with Red Jumpsuit Apparatus and then with Three Days Grace, we decided that it’s important to take a look at the legalities and ask about how to deal with situations like this. So we decided to ask our good buddy Nicole Fara Silver. Nicole is no stranger to the Phoblographer, we interviewed her a while back about shooting better concert photos. She is a freelance photographer for Rolling Stone and has years of experience under her belt.

Given what’s going on right now in the photo world in regards to bands, here’s what Nicole had to say.

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Here’s a big dose of adrenaline for you today: a remarkable BASE jump off the World’s Tallest Building.

World Champion BASE jumpers Vince Reffet and Fred Fugen just set a new world record on Monday, April 21, for jumping off of Burj Khalifa’s pinnacle and the video that recorded their jump is nothing short of exhilarating.

At 2,722 feet, Burj Khalifa in Dubai holds the title for the world’s tallest building. People have, in the past, BASE jumped off this towering structure before. In fact, Nasir Al Niyadi and Omar Al Hegelan set the world record back in 2010 for doing the exact same thing, only at 2,716 feet.

This time however, Reffet and Fugen broke that previous world record by launching off 6 feet higher. BASE jumping is no easy undertaking but this one is even tougher than usual. Not only did these two go through three years worth of intensive BASE jump training in Switzerland and Dubai, jumping off helicopters and the Lauterbeunnen Mountain, before their record-breaking jump; but they also had to, with the help of several people, set up and attach a special 3×9-feet rigging to the pinnacle so they could use it as their launching platform.

Of course, they made it look like a piece of cake in the video, as terrifying as it was to watch, let alone experience first hand. To us spectators, the whole jump was an adrenaline-pumping, mind-blowing experience. To Reffet and Fugen, it was so much more. It was a dream coming true.

Watch their insane jump after, well, the jump.

Via Gizmodo

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lenscap-FB-AdLooking to give its customers a bit more protection LensRentals has revamped its damage waiver program to help customers from having to pay the full bill for stolen and broken equipment. LensRentals announced it has added two optional protection plans called Lenscap and Lenscap+.

The standard Lenscap plan adds protection from drops, spills, and most importantly, bear attacks—all basic things photographers have to contend with on a daily basis. It will also limit your liability to the lesser of the cost to repair the equipment or 10% of the replacement cost. The underlying note of all of this you’ll never have to fork over more than 10% of the replacement cost of the damaged equipment, no matter how expensive the repair actually is. Of course that does not give you license to be a jerk throw your camera at a bear.

Additionally Lenscap+ add coverage for even more scenarios including fire, lightening, being sucked into a tornado, and in case it falls from an aircraft. Most importantly Lenscap+ is a more robust plan that photographers some insurance in case of theft and other situations where it’s impossible to return the rented equipment.

Prior to the Lenscap and Lenscap+ plans, LensRentals offered a flat $10 protection waiver. However, with the new plans pricing is variable with the standard Lenscap plan adding a fee that hovers around 15% of the rental cost of each equipment piece. Lenscap+, meanwhile, adds an average additional 25% cost to the rental. But it’s always better to pay out a few bucks upfront rather than pay for a bear mauled Zeiss lens in full.

Check past the break for a detailed breakdown of the Lenscap+ plan

Via Canon Rumors

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Yesterday, we reported about the éclat caused by American alternative band Red Jumpsuit Apparatus, after they had used a photograph taken during one of their gigs without the photographer’s permission. Not only wasn’t the photographer properly credited when the band uploaded the picture to its Facebook page, the image was also cropped so as not to show the photographer’s watermark, and it was heavily edited. All of this combines to one grave case of copyright infringement.

However, instead of acknowledging their wrongdoing, the band instead publicly shamed the photographer for asking them to either pay a licensing fee, or take the image down. In the end, their attempt at bullying a photographer out of his legal rights failed miserably, and the band was forced to publicly apologize to the photographer. But instead of realizing what they had done wrong, they went on to state that they believe “most forms of DIGITAL art should be FREE!”

Photographers’ copyrights not being respected, and their work not being valued, is an old story and sadly a recurring theme, and Red Jumpsuit Apparatus weren’t the first to display such an arrogant and neglectful behaviour. Unfortunately, they also weren’t (and won’t be) the last. In what seems to be a direct reaction to the RJA incident, the tour manager of the rock band Three Days Grace, Shawn Hamm, now also weighed in on the matter, again downplaying the role of the photographer in concert photography.

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