First Impressions: Fujifilm 80mm f2.8 R LM OIS WR Macro (Sample Images Included)

The Fujifilm 80mm f2.8 R LM OIS WR Macro is a lens that seems to be a really interesting one. It’s one of Fujifilm’s largest prime lenses and though it doesn’t sport as wide of an aperture as the 90mm f2, it has lots of features like close focusing abilities. Due to this feature alone, it may be an attractive option not only for shooting macro photos but also as a portrait focal length. When used with the latest camera options from Fujifilm, it’s a lens that offers pretty fast focusing abilities in addition to a fully weather sealed package.

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Stop Asking for Other Photographers’ Camera Settings

Let’s get the facts straight: You’re not going to learn how to take compelling photographs by asking for other people’s camera settings. Or their EXIF data. Sure, you can get away with it for the first few times when you’re still a complete beginner fiddling with your camera’s controls. But you will never truly learn how to be a photographer with your own style and vision if you keep doing this bad practice.

This the frustration of author and photographer Tony Northrup, but I’m sure many others are also shaking their heads in annoyance whenever they’re asked for their camera settings. For one, it’s a common practice for photographers today to use both auto and manual modes for their photos to get the results that they want. Second, there’s more to a truly outstanding photograph than getting someone else’s camera settings and using them on your photos. Third, the post-process now allows photographers to fix whatever issues they had while taking the shot.

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Mitja Kobal Documents the Japanese Way of the Blade Today

All images by Mitja Kobal. Used with Creative Commons Permission

Whether you’re a practicing photojournalist or simply interested in real-world photo narratives, today’s fascinating set will certainly inspire you. Many centuries after the samurai rose to power in medieval and early-modern Japan, the excellent craftsmanship of their blades still persist to this day. This is what Vienna-based photographer Mitja Kobal has found and chronicled for an interesting photo documentary project.

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How to Get Sharply Focused Photos with a Wide Aperture

Shooting with a wide aperture allows you to drastically isolate your subject from the background and play around with bokeh, making it a neat technique for portrait photography. However, it also comes with a cost: the focus tends to be sharp only towards the center of your frame. Irene Rudnyk shows us how to get our subject sharp throughout your frame even with apertures as wide as f1.2.

Irene Rudnyk has been shooting dreamy portraits in natural light and the wide aperture of her 85mm f1.2 helps her make her subjects stand out. One of the questions she gets often is how she gets sharply focused portraits with such a wide aperture. Her answer? Using her camera’s auto focus (activated by half-pressing the shutter) to focus around the eyes in the center of her frame, and when that’s locked, recompose to how she wants it. She demonstrates how easy this technique is in the video below.

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Sonia Szóstak’s “Magic Hours” Depict Vivid and Gorgeous Landscapes

All images by Sonia Szóstak. Used with Creative Commons Permission

Nature has been mankind’s biggest sources of inspiration and ideas for all kinds of creative pursuits. Nothing compares to being inspired while immersing in the hues, textures, lines, shapes, and formations that we can find in the great outdoors. Such was the experience of photographer Sonia Szóstak and her team while travelling across the beautiful landscapes of Bolivia and Peru.

For Paris-based Sonia Szóstak, Bolivia and Peru are among the best places to study color composition, and her series of travel photos entitled Magic Hours bear testament to this claim. Indeed, her beautiful snaps show jagged mountains, sloping hillsides, snowy hiking trails, and sprawling grasslands painted in different eye-catching colors. This set definitely shows what makes the two destinations among the most sought after in South America.

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Review: Sony 12-24mm f4 G FE (Sony E Mount, Full Frame)

The Sony 12-24mm f4 G FE was announced earlier this year hot on the heels of Sigma’s own lens–and for the photographer who loves to shoot wide this lens could be the only lens you’ll care to travel with. The Sony 12-24mm f4 G FE was designed with weather resistance and is being touted as a G lens, not to be mistaken with the company’s G Master offerings. Like many of Sony’s higher end lenses, it’s a pretty pricy offering but we need to expect that from a wide angle lens. Lenses like the Sony 12-24mm f4 G FE are most suited for travel photography, landscapes, astrophotography, architecture and to some degree extreme sports. It’s also fun at parties if you’re looking to get a unique perspective. But photographers may have a tough choice between the Sony 12-24mm f4 G FE and the 16-35mm f2.8.

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“Broken” is an Emotional Depiction of the Golden Years of Togetherness

All images by Kremer Johnson Photography and Jeff Whitlock. Used with Creative Commons Permission.

When couples are photographed, we usually see them in their ecstatic, soon-to-tie-the-knot mode in engagement shoots, or in the euphoria of their wedding day. What usually happens in the golden years of marriage, however, is something that we don’t really see documented in photos or snapshots. This is most likely the idea behind a recent collaborative work between Neil Kremer and Cory Johnson of Kremer Johnson Photography and digital artist Jeff Whitlock.

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Review: Canon 6D Mk II

I want to get something straight that not a lot of reviews are putting out there: the Canon 6D Mk II isn’t a bad camera, in fact for most people, it will be a pretty darned good one. But for the rest of us that are at a point where we are demanding more from our cameras and image quality, we shouldn’t even be looking at this one. In many ways, the Canon 6D Mk II is the modern Canon full frame Rebel. What do I mean by that? Canon has squarely given the camera enough features to please the folks who just want to move up to full frame and their current lineup of users. There’s nothing incredibly revolutionary about it and the folks at the NYTimes aren’t bound to write praises all about it; but at the same time it isn’t a terrible camera at all.

But in every single way, it isn’t something that I’d recommend to any sort of working pro or semi-professional except for perhaps portrait photographers.

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