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Model: Erica Lourde

Model: Erica Lourde

Portrait lenses are an interesting topic due to the balance that’s needed with them. They need to be sharp, but if they’re too sharp, they can make skin look too detailed and not soft. Sure, this can be fixed in post-production but it’s often long and arduous work, and needs to be very exacting so that the images don’t look overdone or unnatural.

For that reason, we aren’t at all saying that sharp lenses aren’t good. In fact, they’re great! Many of them have won our Editor’s Choice awards. Instead, we’re saying that these lenses find a good balance between being very detailed with great image quality but not so detailed to the point where you’ll see way too much of the pores. When used in conjunction with modern image sensors, these lenses will make portrait shooting much easier.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 16-55mm f2.8 WR review Graham's images (15 of 19)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 2.8

Food photography isn’t tough to do, but good quality food photography can be incredibly tough. It’s all about timing, composition, colors and lighting. Good food photography whets an appetite and elicits emotions connected to food. If you can make someone smell the Mac and Cheese that you just cooked, then you’re well on your way to making better food images.

Here’s how to go about shooting better food images by using one light and keeping it simple.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer DSLR Maintenance (5 of 5)ISO 2001-160 sec at f - 5.6

Lots of sites and folks have talked about the death of DSLRs, and to be honest it probably isn’t too far away until we as photographers experience a whole new revolution. First there was the advent of 35mm film, then color, then digital, and now it’s been proven that mirrorless cameras are quite capable of doing pretty much the same things that DSLRs can.

Tracking focus for sports? Check out the Olympus OMD EM5 MK II. Film-like look? Go to Fujifilm. All the connectivity you could want? Check out Samsung. Full frame? Sony has got it made here. Something more consumer oriented? Nikon’s 1 series pretty much has the market cornered.

Yes, folks like the “pro look” of a DSLR. But the initial complaints about mirrorless cameras are mostly gone. Shutter lag in the viewfinder? Not anymore. Lens selection that’s lacking? Nope. Systems have caught up, and what you can’t get first party, you can get from a third party.

We’d love to read your comments below and we’d also love it if you voted in the poll below.

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DrewEnglish_Portrait_013

All images by Drew English. Used with permission.

I’m not afraid of people. I’m not afraid of talking to total strangers. But for years I have had an aversion to approaching people on the street and getting them to participate in my creative process point blank. Living in New York City, you’re consistently surrounded by seemingly unlimited human diversity, which I find very artistically inspiring. My eye is often drawn to an interesting face, look or style and my knee-jerk reaction is a desire to capture their portrait. Unfortunately, my nerves always held me back and I have missed out on countless opportunities.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Langly Alpha Pro Camera Bag review photos (2 of 9)ISO 4001-1700 sec at f - 1.4

“Hold up guys, I need to change my lenses.”

Rewind to 2007 when I was still in college and my photojournalism teacher and mentor taught me to never be this guy. Fast forward to 2008 during my first internship at PC Mag (then PC Magazine) and the journalists that I interned under would say the same thing. Why? Well, that guy slows everyone else down in the group.

This is one of the primary reasons why I don’t use backpacks for my photo gear, but when it comes to packing loads and loads of stuff on you in a comfortable yet low profile and fashionable way, it’s very tough to beat the Langly Alpha Pro backpack. Sure, backpacks don’t give you the quick, on the go access that a messenger or tote bag do, but it makes up for it in being able to carry lots of stuff on a daily excursion.

Made of canvas and leather, Langly camera bags join ONA, zKin, Artisan and Artist  and others amongst the lineup of beautiful camera bags designed to also be very functional as a camera bag.

So how does it do? To be honest, Langly may have everyone else beat when it comes to the adventure photographer.

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Infographic-Chris-Gampat-The-Phoblographer-Sitting-Portrait-Infographic-(1-of-1)ISO-4001-250-sec-at-f---2.2

We’ve taught you a bit about shooting portrait subjects from the halfway point, but one of the biggest challenges is shooting a seated portrait subject. For starters, you should have them sit on their rear and not have their thighs on the seat at all. Why? It makes the thighs look thinner and squishes the stomach less.

What else? We strongly recommend working on the wardrobe with your subject and using well fitted clothing. Overall though, this infographic will teach you how to shoot a seated portrait subject.