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Leading lines in photography are some of the best ways to naturally tell the viewer where to look–besides using depth of field, rule of thirds and more. But they’re very important in regards to portraits because of the way that it can make a body specifically look. The folks over at Weekly Imogen talk about specifics like using corners and other lines based on the specifics of the portraiture (such as posing.)

Essentially what they’re saying is to use natural areas but don’t look at your scene in terms of simple emphasis on your subject. Instead, they’re trying to teach you to look at the entire scene. Don’t think that’s important? Consider the fact that simple things that are out of focus can end up bothering viewers because of the way that it looks like they’re coming out of a person’s body.

One of the absolute best ways to teach yourself to look at leading lines is to shoot an image and render it in black and white. Then after this, print the image out and draw the lines out on another sheet of paper. Look at the shape and decide whether it’s interesting or not. This exercise will teach you to see the world in a different way.

The video on using leading lines is after the jump.

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julius motal the phoblographer honest magazine interview image 06

It isn’t often that you hear about a new photography magazine starting up. It’s much rarer than that to hear about a new photography magazine dedicated solely to film photography, but that is the case with Honest. Born of a shared passion between three friends, Honest. is a quarterly magazine dedicated to all things film. It’s another sign that the medium isn’t dead, and it had a successful launch earlier this year. Here, we talk with the three folks behind the magazine: Kaveh Tabatabaie, Luca Mercedes and Stefanie Neunteufl.

For more about Honest., you can check out the website, and you can order the inaugural issue here. They had their launch on January 22 in Gowanus, and will start an Indiegogo campaign soon. Their Vienna launch will be at Heurer/Kunsthallencafe on June 17.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony 35mm f1.4 Full Frame E Mount lens first impressions product images (1 of 6)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 2.5

Dear photography mentors,

I hate the 50mm focal length.

No really; I really, really hate it.

The lens is a Jack of all trades but master of none–and it tries to do many things well but ultimately fails are doing them as well as other focal lengths. I am writing this post on May 2nd 2015 and it marks the 10th year that I’ve been a photographer; not a guy with a camera, a photographer. And through the years I used to believe what everyone said about using the 50mm focal length and how it will be the only lens that you ever need. But man, was that wrong.

Why did you tell me to use it?

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Model: Erica Lourde

Model: Erica Lourde

Portrait lenses are an interesting topic due to the balance that’s needed with them. They need to be sharp, but if they’re too sharp, they can make skin look too detailed and not soft. Sure, this can be fixed in post-production but it’s often long and arduous work, and needs to be very exacting so that the images don’t look overdone or unnatural.

For that reason, we aren’t at all saying that sharp lenses aren’t good. In fact, they’re great! Many of them have won our Editor’s Choice awards. Instead, we’re saying that these lenses find a good balance between being very detailed with great image quality but not so detailed to the point where you’ll see way too much of the pores. When used in conjunction with modern image sensors, these lenses will make portrait shooting much easier.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Fujifilm 16-55mm f2.8 WR review Graham's images (15 of 19)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 2.8

Food photography isn’t tough to do, but good quality food photography can be incredibly tough. It’s all about timing, composition, colors and lighting. Good food photography whets an appetite and elicits emotions connected to food. If you can make someone smell the Mac and Cheese that you just cooked, then you’re well on your way to making better food images.

Here’s how to go about shooting better food images by using one light and keeping it simple.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer DSLR Maintenance (5 of 5)ISO 2001-160 sec at f - 5.6

Lots of sites and folks have talked about the death of DSLRs, and to be honest it probably isn’t too far away until we as photographers experience a whole new revolution. First there was the advent of 35mm film, then color, then digital, and now it’s been proven that mirrorless cameras are quite capable of doing pretty much the same things that DSLRs can.

Tracking focus for sports? Check out the Olympus OMD EM5 MK II. Film-like look? Go to Fujifilm. All the connectivity you could want? Check out Samsung. Full frame? Sony has got it made here. Something more consumer oriented? Nikon’s 1 series pretty much has the market cornered.

Yes, folks like the “pro look” of a DSLR. But the initial complaints about mirrorless cameras are mostly gone. Shutter lag in the viewfinder? Not anymore. Lens selection that’s lacking? Nope. Systems have caught up, and what you can’t get first party, you can get from a third party.

We’d love to read your comments below and we’d also love it if you voted in the poll below.

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