web analytics

Pro Tip: The larger the light modifier is, the softer the light will be on your subject in relation to distance from them.

Pro Tip: The larger the light modifier is, the softer the light will be on your subject in relation to distance from them.

Want more Useful Photography Tips? Click here.

Your camera is at the lowest ISO setting it could possibly organically be at, your shutter speed has hit the maximum setting, and you still want to shoot an image with the lens wide open. The challenge: the sun is way too bright and giving off too much light to let you get anything near a correct exposure.

So how do you shoot the photo? There are three different ways.

The first one is the simplest and least expensive. Try to backlight the subject. Of course, this is tougher if your subject is a flower or your children running around because it means you need to get very low to the ground. But otherwise it’s a solid option.

The second option: use a shoot through umbrella or a translucent reflector to diffuse the sunlight. This will usually kill enough of it to let you get a more balanced exposure. In the case of the umbrella, it can also be used as a fun prop.

The final option: try a variable ND filter–which is what film photographers used to use. These filters let you cut out a specific amount of like that you set them to just by turning them. The quality of these filters has improved so much that it’s bound to not ruin the quality of your image.

eat sleep shoot-2 copy

All images by Lester Cannon. Used with permission; also be sure to check out our previous interview with Lester.

This was a Facebook comment left by a very passionate film photographer I was chatting with in a group a few months ago. I thought to myself, “That sounds pretty harsh”. As I thought more about what he wrote, the words ring true. Here’s why…

[click to continue…]

Fabio-Final-2-16x24

Image by photographer James Douglas.

Editor’s Note: This is a syndicated blog post from Photographer James Douglas. It is being used with permission, as are all images in this post.

Here at TJDS, we have some pretty strict guidelines for utilizing and sharing the images that we create; the literature to explain our guidelines looks pretty daunting attached to an email, but we hope it isn’t taken that way. Our goal at the studio as well as around town is to educate everyone from artists just getting started to our clients (since one can be just as misinformed as the other on many issues) on the proper ways to credit and distribute creative work.

One of the most important, yet frequently overlooked aspects of the creative process is providing appropriate credit to the artist(s) who create. Another overlooked aspect is the need to respect artistic vision and not altering the art from it’s original form. Hopefully this post will mitigate a lot of unpleasant conversations about why an individual, company, celebrity, organization, etc. would need to give credit to the artist they are working with when utilizing original artwork. Why so much emphasis on artistic credit? Because there are so many ways proper credit can benefit our business and literally no way it could negatively impact a client’s. As a photographer the following points will largely apply to my chosen medium but what I’ll attempt to explain(without pissing too many people off) is fairly universal across the artistic spectrum.

So here goes.

[click to continue…]

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

When you take a photo, do you remember the moments as they were happening at all? According to a study called “Point-and-Shoot Memories: The Influence of Taking Photos on Memory for a Museum Tour” done by Fairfield University, the answer is no. The study shows that taking images actually causes what the New York Times cites as “photo-taking-impairment effect.”

According to the study, groups were given digital cameras when taking a tour around an art museum, they were instructed to take photos of certain objects and observe others without taking photos. The study concluded that taking photos impaired their memory of the objects because their mind was too busy taking a photo–however their memory wasn’t affected if they were told to zoom in on a specific area.

Further conclusions stated that memories were totally intact if they didn’t take photos of the object.

Though this is only one study, it makes a lot of sense considering that our society is spending so much time taking photo after photo and many times doesn’t get the shot right to begin with.

On a personal level though, we can relate. We test lots of cameras here and sometimes have cameras with us at events that we go to. When you’re too busy taking photos, you tend to only concentrate on getting the shot as best as you can. Otherwise, everything else gets filtered out.

Via On Taking Pictures

Fine_Art_1st_Place_Amateur_Adam_Jurgilewicz_Mono_Awards_2014

Fine_Art_1st_Place_Amateur_Adam_Jurgilewicz_Mono_Awards_2014

All images used with permission of the Monochrome awards.

Photographs in black and white are without a double inspirational and pull at certain strings in the human soul. So when we were told about the winners of the 2014 Monochrome awards and shown the images, we were stunned. The committee received over 7,000 submissions and photographer Neil Carver won the grand prize of $2,000.

The images from him and other photographers are after the jump.

[click to continue…]

IMG_9623edited

All images by Jillian Powers. Used with permission.

“I chose this time of day because it is the moment we begin to criticize and shame our bodies. It all started by photographing my roommate, Aliya, moments after she woke up. It was the day before her boudoir session and I wanted to test the lighting on her skin at a specific time in the morning.” says Jillian Powers on her series “I Woke Up Like This.”

Photographer Jillian Powers is a 21-year old wedding photographer located in Chicago, Illinois. She’s a hustler that spends all of her time building her business, helping others, and adventuring around the world when she can. So when she pitched us the idea of “I Woke Up Like This” we were quite intrigued due to it being a departure from the rest of her work.

“I Woke Up Like This” began in October of 2014 as a personal project but quickly grew into something larger than she expected. Jill now dedicates half of her time to building the project and traveling all over the world to do so. We talked to her about what the project is about and the portrait sessions.

Editor’s Note: Because we know lots of you read our site at work, we’ve chosen a couple of photos that your workplace may find a bit less offensive. However, we truly feel that “I Woke Up Like This” is a project that needs to be shared. And for that reason, we think that you should check out the full project.

[click to continue…]