web analytics

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Western Digital My Passport Wireless review images (2 of 7)ISO 4001-40 sec at f - 6.3

Mylio. Dropbox. Google Photos. EyeFi Cloud. Adobe Cloud. If you’re a more modern photographer, then all of these sound familiar to you. But if you also take a look in your desk drawers you’ll find solutions from Western Digital, LaCie, etc. For the most part they’ll work, but what about years from now when those hard drives start to fail? And what about years from now if these photo services fail?

What photographers used to do is take their negatives in for development, then print them and then someone in the family was responsible for archiving the family history in album after album. The hardcover photo album is still a wonderful relic of the past, but its simple nature is very archaic and not fast enough for today’s world. Seriously, who has time to sit there and put photos into an album?

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat Julianne Margiotta's Edits (54 of 56)ISO 4001-60 sec at f - 3.2

Almost everyone dreams of getting their hands on a full frame 35mm digital camera, and while people want it, they don’t need it necessarily. So why would you need a full frame camera? Two reasons are high ISO image quality and more megapixels, particularly if your job demands these things. Additionally, if you need a shallower depth of field than what you’re capable of getting (though wide aperture lenses are always available) then you may need a full frame camera. But again, this isn’t entirely necessary.

Not many people really NEED a full frame camera–and if you do then why not shoot with 120 film or 645 medium format digital?

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Asus ux501 laptop (3 of 9)ISO 4001-100 sec at f - 2.8

Don’t put every image that you shoot into your portfolio.

That’s the very first thing that I find myself telling photographers who pitch their work to the site and unfortunately don’t get featured. Figuring out which photos should go into your portfolio can be tough to do unless you know how to think and emotionally remove yourself from the photo itself.

To build a better portfolio, you have to keep shooting and then become a slave to the camera and your own creative ideas. It’s how you’ll get better and continue to evolve and change your work. But there are loads of things to think about when actually putting the photo portfolio together to show off to the world.

Here’s what you should consider, though it surely isn’t the end all be all list.

[click to continue…]

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Film–it’s something that tugs at the hearts of many a photographer. It has a beautiful nostalgic look to it and one that reminds us in a world that is primarily digital that there are still things that are tangible and one of a kind. So when the Impossible Project updated their black and white film to version 2.0, we joined other photographers in pure excitement. The company promised that the images would fade and turn to sepia much slower–additionally they promised better image quality.

Indeed, when you go for the impossible task of reverse engineering some of the world’s most popular films, you’re going to run into mistakes. For this, it’s excusable as it’s a tough task after all. But it’s also the only black and white instant film available on the market since the discontinuation of Fujifilm 3000-B.

[click to continue…]

Model: Asta Peredes

Model: Asta Peredes

One of the things that every portrait photographer is taught when starting out is that you should never photograph a person from below. For the most part, this stands true–but if done correctly, photographing a subject from below can make them look heroic or visually put that person on a pedestal. The way to do this involves partially some work on your end and work on your subject’s end. With every portrait tutorial, it starts with a good wardrobe that makes the person feel confident about themselves and some instructions from you.

[click to continue…]

Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sigma dp and 50mm f1.4 product images first impressions (6 of 12)ISO 64001-40 sec at f - 4.0

We’re going to start this post off by saying that at this point in the year 2015 and this stage in digital photography, image noise isn’t a major problem unless you’re printing. But for most folks who shoot and upload to the web, image noise isn’t a major issue. It can easily be fixed in post-production with the push or a slider, you can get back incredible amounts of image details, preserve your colors, and you can also choose to shoot at a lower ISO and push the files because shadow detail recovery is that damned good.

If you’re a pixel peeper that lives and dies by looking at your images at 100%, you’re living in an archaic age that doesn’t really exist anymore. For Pete’s sake, folks are shooting ad campaigns with an iPhone.

[click to continue…]