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Kevin Lee The Phoblographer Breakthrough Photography X-Series Filters Product Images-09

With the many advances in technology that have happened over the years, lenses have become better and better at reducing flare from sun and light overall. This has to do with how glass has become better and how the chemistry involved in the coatings has improved.

Many, many years ago back in the film days, photographers needed to use UV filters with their lenses. One of the biggest reasons for this had to do with glare from the sun and extraneous light that caused flaring that didn’t look so great. Indeed though, lens flare can sometimes look great but it is very situational.

Then the digital photography revolution happened, and the UV filters started to degrade the image quality that you’d see. The reason for this had to do with the glass involved.

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Chris Gampat The Phoblographer Sony NEX 7 product images (2 of 6)ISO 400

A new Sony A7000 seems ever more likely as another source has told Sony Alpha Rumors we will see a new high-end APS-C E-mount camera in 2015. There wasn’t any definite word on specs, but the camera will purportedly be step up from the current Sony A6000. Similarly an exact release date for this camera is still up in the air, however, the source claims the camera was practically finalized when they saw it.

A few months ago we heard the A7000 would be the end all, be all of Sony’s APS-C camera line equipped with a 1/8000 second shutter, weather sealing, and capable of 4K video. Essentially this will be a high-end compact mirrorless camera in every way the Sony A7 Mk II and Sony A7s are except with a smaller sensor. This could also mean that the new focusing improvements added to the a7 Mk II could come to this camera.

It was also rumored to come with a new 16-50mm f3.5-5.6 power-zoom lens. Supposedly this revised lens will be big step up in image quality from the current kit lens, which we’ve previously used much to our chagrin because of its softness and tendency to fringe at the mere sight of a high-contrast scene.

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SLRLounge recently released a snippet from a premium tutorial video of theirs that details a bunch of really simple landscape photography tips. The video talks about a couple of things that many people, even more experienced shooters don’t do. They start out by encouraging you to set up your framing for the scene first and being very careful and meticulous about it. But the real meat of the video has to do with your exposures. They state that you should slow down the shutter speed and lower the ISO–which is fine if you want to create a dreamy scene with exaggerated motion. But if you don’t want to do that, then shoot at a faster shutter speed.

They also talk a bit about apertures, but we feel that they should have spent more time on them–they’re really important when it comes to shooting landscapes.

The video on landscape photography tips is after the jump.

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zeiss touit 32mm sony nex 6

Interviewing a number of photographers this year has made me realize that one of the best ways to actually become a better photographer isn’t to necessarily shoot more like many photographers will tell you to, but to instead shoot less and think more critically and carefully about every single photo that you take. Indeed, a photographer who thinks carefully about each photo that they shoot (in terms of exposure, composition, elements, and overall look) will overall shoot less than someone simply just spraying and praying machine gun style, hoping that each image will yield something better than the last one.

A model that we often shoot for the site recently told me that I’m unlike many other photographers. I know exactly what I want, I shoot it, and I’m done. Others tend to just shoot and shoot and shoot. Folks that have joined me me during my photo walks also say the same thing.

The photographer that sprays and prays will overall come away with more work, but chances are highly against them that they will want to display every single image in their portfolio. To be specific, I’m talking about a photographer presenting their portfolio in an attempt to actually gain better photography work–not someone simply just uploading to their Flickr or 500px.

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Want more Useful Photography Tips? Click here.

The question of whether one should use TTL vs manual flash output is one that many photographers will experience at one point or another in their careers. Both methods have their advantages and disadvantages. The majority of flashes can shoot in manual mode (thought there are some that indeed can’t and there are also flashes that can do both). But not every flash can fire in TTL mode.

TTL communication requires specific pins on the camera hot shoe and flash to communicate and relay information about the exposure to make the two work together.

In general, TTL has been the king when it comes to photojournalism, weddings, events, and sports. But in situations where you are trying to mix ambient lighting with natural lighting, TTL can be a godsend and eliminate the need for specific metering that will need to be done. In my apartment, I sometimes like shooting a subject in front of a window. Evenly illuminating the subject while properly exposing the outside can be tough, but it is a challenge very easily done by using TTL metering.

Manual light output is typically used on editorial, portrait, headshot, commercial, and fine art photo situations where someone can take their time and set a scene up. It gives the photographer specific control over the light to make it look brighter or darker or exactly the way that they want it. In contrast, a TTL system will read your camera meter and adapt itself to deliver a result that you may not necessarily want.

Manual lighting also works best when working with large light modifiers as a TTL light can sometimes not work so effectively based on various parameters like how large a light modifier is and how far it is positioned from a subject.

Keep this in mind when you’re shooting, and be sure to also check out our massive lighting tutorial roundup.

Leica-Submit-images

Hi everyone,

This is just a note to tell everyone that we’re going to announce the winners of our Leica and Fujifilm contests on Saturday. There are lots and lots of entries in both sections and it’s taking a while to make a decision.

We’re sorry for the inconvenience.

And just to let you know: the most popular image for each contest is not the winner.

Stay tuned!