You Can Own a Vintage “Tintype” of Edgar Allan Poe for $150,000

If you’re an avid collector of historic tintype images or simply interested in curious-looking, antique pieces, this ebay listing should get you intrigued at least.

Previously in our non-camera vintage finds, we’ve seen a number of interesting and historic prints come up, including a vintage Ansel Adams print, signed Henri Cartier-Bresson prints, and a rare Andy Warhol Polaroid self-portrait. Today, we’re adding another intriguing item to our list; a vintage tintype of American poet, editor, and literary critic Edgar Allan Poe. If that’s something you’d like to add to your collection of vintage curiosities, it’s going to cost you $150,000.

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Alchemy Tintype: A Response to Today’s Forgettable Images

If you loved our feature on how old school photography studios are standing out today, here’s our full interview with Alchemy Tintype’s Ashley Jennings for additional reading.

We’re confident that some of you are shocked that the film industry is still alive and kicking. If you fall into this camp, you’d be even more astonished to find out that even older, more ancient, antiquated photography processes — tintypes and ambrotypes — are still around. Best of all, you can book a sitting today with studios offering portrait sessions in these unique processes. We very recently got in touch with a bunch of these old school photography studios to find out how they are standing out from their modern counterparts. You’ve most likely read about that here. However, we also wanted to share with our readers our full interview with each of these studios to paint a clearer picture of their visions, how they work, and what it’s like running their unique spaces.

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Lumiere Tintype: Inspired by Traveling Photographers of Centuries Past

If you loved our feature on how old school photography studios are standing out today, here’s our full interview with Lumiere Tintype’s Adrian Whipp for additional reading.

We’re confident that some of you are shocked that the film industry is still alive and kicking, If you fall into this camp, you’d be even more astonished to find out that more ancient, antiquated photography processes — tintypes and ambrotypes — are still around. Best of all, you can book a sitting today with studios offering portrait sessions in these unique processes. We very recently got in touch with a bunch of these old school photography studios to find out how they are standing out from their modern counterparts. You’ve most likely read about that here. However, we also wanted to share with our readers our full interview with each of these studios to paint a clearer picture of their visions, how they work, and what it’s like running their unique spaces.

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Kari Orvik Runs a Thriving Appointment-Only Tintype Studio In San Fran

If you loved our feature on how old school photography studios are standing out today, here’s our full interview with Kari Orvik for additional reading.

We’re confident that some of you are shocked that the film industry is still alive and kicking, If you fall into this camp, you’d be even more astonished to find out that more ancient, antiquated photography processes — tintypes and ambrotypes — are still around. Best of all, you can book a sitting today with studios offering portrait sessions in these unique processes. We very recently got in touch with a bunch of these old school photography studios to find out how they are standing out from their modern counterparts. You’ve most likely read about that here. However, we also wanted to share with our readers our full interview with each of these studios to paint a clearer picture of their visions, how they work, and what it’s like running their unique spaces.

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The Tintype Studio: Revisiting a Chapter of Photography History

If you loved our feature on how old school photography studios are standing out today, here’s our full interview with The Tintype Studio for additional reading.

If you’re surprised that film is still alive and kicking, you’d definitely be even more astonished to find out that even more antiquated photography processes — tintypes and ambrotypes — are still around. Best of all, you can book a sitting today with studios offering portrait sessions in these unique processes. We very recently got in touch with a bunch of these old school photography studios to find out how they are standing out from their modern counterparts. You’ve most likely read about that here. However, we also wanted to share with our readers our full interview with each of these studios to paint a clearer picture of their visions, how they work, and what it’s like running their unique spaces. For today, the spotlight is on The Tintype Studio, which offers a fun and retro take on portrait sessions in their creative space in downtown Toronto.

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It’s Not Photoshop! How Old School Photography Studios are Standing Out in 2019

The next time you need a one-of-a-kind portrait, consider turning to one of these old school photography studios.

There’s no doubt that photography has gone a long way, from the equipment down to the techniques, and even the purpose of each shot. However, we haven’t really forgotten about the craft’s humble beginnings. If the fact that film is still very much alive surprises many today, imagine the astonishment once they learn that even more archaic photographic techniques are still being practiced. Wet collodion photography is as old school as it gets, and there are still a good number of studios out there that offer the unique experience and result it brings.

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“Big Red” Tells the Story of One Man’s Big Love for Tintype Photography

This collaboration is all about the inspiring story of Steven Glynn’s unique preference for tintype photography, and how it can also be an inspiration for anyone who grew up feeling out of place

Through a collaboration between photo-video accessories maker Vanguard and Taproot Pictures, we learn about yet another photographer’s big love for tintype photography at a time of digital perfection. Whether you’re looking for some inspiration to get you out of a creative slump, or you’re just simply passionate about traditional photographic processes, this story is definitely for you.

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Photographer Joel Crane Wants to Create a Multi-Format Tintype Camera

Australia based photographer and woodsmaker, Joel Crane, has launched a Kickstarter campaign for his unique custom-built multi-format tintype camera. A fan of many different photography mediums including 35mm, medium, and large format, Crane is using his passion for older methods of photography to create a modern version of the classic tintype camera. Unique to crane’s model is a multi-format design with swappable backs allowing different size images to be created from 5 x 7 and up.  Continue reading…

Photographer Giles Clement Created The Most Ridiculously Cool Image Ever

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Image by Giles Clement. Used with permission.

Photographer Giles Clement is no stranger to our site. We interviewed him a while back about his tintype work, and many people are smitten with his Instagram account. When he originally shared the post in the post in the Collodion Bastards: Wet Plate Work of Questionable Parentage Facebook group, he did so with the caption:

“Give me an aluminum carousel horse and I shall find you a naked man to sit upon it.” – Ansel Adams

But when asked if the image was created in an ode to the great photographer’s quote, he tells us “It’s definitely not an Adams quote, just my lack of a suitable caption.”

Giles tells us that the concept for the shoot was very much on the spot and fairly half assed–but he tells us that these are amongst his favorites. “I was shooting at a borrowed studio in Richmond Virginia, when I went in in the morning I saw the horse and told my friend there that I wanted to get a naked Viking on it, and if she knew anybody please let them know.” says Giles. “She tried a few people with no luck but later in the day Nick walked through the door I took one look at him and knew he was my guy. He kindly agreed to get naked and sit on a rather cold metal horse for me and the image was born.”

The photo is a tintype, photographed using an orbit 8×10 camera and a 185mm f/4.5 Tessar lens. Giles is known for this type of work, and he’s even been featured in Vanity Fair.

“I do not have a series in mind for this.” says Giles about whether or not he would turn this into a viral internet series. “But if you’re asking whether I will photograph more naked people doing absurd things the answer is yes.”

Shooting Tintype Portraits at the Sundance Film Festival

Screenshot taken from the video

Screenshot taken from the video

Photographer Victoria Will shot Tintype portraits at this year’s Sundance Film Festival; and Profoto was able to capture what was going on behind the scenes. Victoria starts out by talking about how tough Tintype shooting is and how the images need to be prepped shot and developed within a couple of minutes while everything is still wet. A photographic emulsion layer is put onto a piece of tin, photographically exposed and then brought back to the darkroom for development.

Victoria talks about how actors love the collaborative experience with the photographer more than just taking directions and so when Victoria shows the celebrities some of her favorite images, they begin to get new ideas and the creative freedom just flows.

The process is also shown in the video in addition to lots of the absolutely beautiful images. The video is after the jump.

Via Profoto Blog

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Watch Mythbusters’ Jamie Hyneman Get His Tintype Portrait Taken

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Tintypes may not be as common as they once were, but the art form certainly isn’t dead. It’s a very precise process that needs either a lot of light all at once or a long exposure time to get it right. The folks at Tested took Mythbusters’ Jamie Hyneman to get his tintype portrait taken by Michael Shindler, a San Francisco-based tintype photographer and one of the best-known in the field.

The video’s a great look at the process involved in creating a tintype. Given the nature of the medium, the plate has an ISO rating of less than 1, typically around .5, which is a little crazy to think about given some of the ISO ranges of recent cameras.

Making a tintype is a highly technical process that necessitates a great deal of patience from both the subject and the photographer, and the result is worth the wait. Taking on such a technically complex art form is a commitment that not everyone can make. Those that do are creating something great for the rest of us.

For more about the process, you can check out wartime tintypes from Afghanistan, our interview with Adrian Whipp and our interview with Giles Clement.

The video’s below after the break.

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Giles Clement: In the Mind of a Professional Tintype Photographer

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All images by Giles Clement. Used with permission.

Being a photographer is tough to make profitable, but we can only imagine how much tougher the analog world has it. Photographer Giles Clement is one of the modern photographers that chooses to use the tintype look and format over film, digital, and other forms of the art. But Giles hasn’t let the complications that come with the format hold him back. Indeed, Mr. Clement has mastered his craft and as figured out ways to make it profitable for him.

In fact, Giles seems to have it all down to a simple science.

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Ed Drew Captures the Reflections of War in His Tintype Photographs

PJ Team Helo

All images taken by and used with permission from Ed Drew.

At least one other soldier stationed in Afghanistan has been documenting a different side of war. Like Wisconsin National Guard Communications Section Chief Sean Huolihan, whose Afghanistan series was recently featured here at the Phoblographer, aerial gunner and photographer Ed Drew of the California Air National Guard also used his skills in photography to document a side of warfare that those not directly involved in it rarely see.

Unlike Huolihan, however, who’s artistic photographs, captured with his trusty Nikon D90, often contained the juxtaposing elements of serenity and combat, Drew kept his focus on his fellow soldiers, his brothers and sisters in arms, and chose to capture them with nothing less than the meticulous process of tintype.

Taking images of war is already hard enough with a DSLR, but Drew took war photography into a whole new level with his large format camera, metal plates, and portable darkbox, which he took with him during his deployment. His photographs are the first tintypes taken in a combat zone since the Civil War.

We do think, however, that it’s more than this actual process that makes his images even more fascinating. True, the classic look of the tintype process makes these images far more interesting than the usual modern war photos; but that look is almost overshadowed by what are actually in the photos – in the mostly pensive, grave, and combat-worn faces of his subjects are true reflections of war and the effect it has on those involved, good and bad.

Drew himself talks about this,

“My work isn’t to make a statement on the war, it’s a family album, where I have taken the portraits of people close to me. I purposely chose to photograph them only, to show my experience through their faces. This series was a reflection of my time in war. I think every Soldier, Airman, Marine and Sailor could agree that its not about the various opinions of what the war is and isn’t, its about our brothers and sister we stand next to. When you think of it like that, you can understand I admired them and respected them.”

This couldn’t be any truer.

See the stirring images from his tintype series in Afghanistan after the jump. For more photos from this series, please visit Drew’s website at www.eddrew.com.

 

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The Resurgence of Tintype Photography: An Interview with Adrian Whipp

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On the road in Austin, Texas, you may come across what looks like a small house attached to the back of a pickup truck. A banner affixed to the side of it will tell you that what exists inside is a tintype photobooth that goes by “Lumiere.” Tintype is a mid 19th-century photographic process by which an image is exposed on a sheet of metal dipped in collodion and a nitrate solution. There’s more chemistry to it than I’m letting on, but it is an old process that Adrian Whipp and Loren Doyen use to create portraits in Austin. We had a chance to speak with Adrian about this vintage endeavor.

All images are courtesy of Adrian Whipp and Loren Doyen.

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“Lumiere” is a Tintype Photobooth on Wheels

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Image courtesy of Adrian Whipp & Loren Doyen.

Tintype photography is a lost art. The term “tintype” is a bit of a misnomer as no actual tin is used. The process, which originated in the mid 1800s, entails coating a metal plate, usually iron, in collodion to prepare it for light sensitivity. The coated plated is then dipped in a silver nitrate solution which makes it light-sensitive. The plate is then loaded into the camera, exposed, and taken into the darkroom for processing. The rest of it entails a bit of chemistry, but this is the process by which many photographs were made way back in the day. And it is the process by which Adrian Whipp and Loren Doyen create their portraits in Lumiere, their tintype studio-on-wheels in Austin, Texas.

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Tintype App for iOS Devices Will Hopefully Make Your Instagrams Suck Less

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Ready to make that Instagram image of your chicken sandwich you had for dinner last night look like a tintype?

The other day we reported on a brand new app called Koloid–which is supposed to mimic the look of Wet Plate Collodian photos. But just recently, a similar app called Tintype has hit the iTunes store as well. Mike Newton, the creator, states that they worked with a Tintype photographer to get the images as close as possible to the real thing. He also wants to help educate people more about the process through the app. And to do that, him and his team plan on adding a national directory of tintype photographers in a future update.

The app is free with a $0.99 upgrade option. You can also visit their website for more and hit the jump for a video explaining the wet plate collodian tintype process.

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Digital Tintypes Will Make Your Grandmother Jealous

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One of these days I will get one of these done, I almost stopped at Photobooth in San Francisco to get my mug on a tintype. For those of us without a hipster wet plate photo booth there’s always Digital Tintypes. The company announced on the first of the month that they will be taking orders for people to send in their images to get processed early 1900s style. Now this isn’t some cheap Instagram filtered image slapped on some metal, they are actually practicing the original practice so your image will be as authentic as possible.

The company is offering three sizes from the 2.5″x2.5″ square tintype for $35, 1″x1″ necklace pendant for $85 or a 5″x7″ for $115. More information on the process and the company can be found on their website. This is the companies newest ecommerce venture after being in the restoration process for almost 15 years. A big thanks to BelieveInFilm for finding and publishing the news. News like this is always welcome after a swell of bad film news the last few days.